Non-Formal Education
54 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Balkrishna Bokil from Teaching in the XXI Century
onto Non-Formal Education
Scoop.it!

Learning World looks at how IT is boosting education worldwide - learning world

"In the modern world education is increasingly technological. From sophisticated robotics...

euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe
Subscribe for your daily dose of international news, curated and explained:http://eurone.ws/10ZCK4a
Euronews is available in 13 other languages:http://eurone.ws/17moBCU

http://www.euronews.com/2013/06/07/le...
In the modern world education is increasingly technological. From sophisticated robotics engineering to tablets in schools, all around the world teachers are upgrading their educational tools in order to give students the skills they will need later on. So how does this change things in the classroom?

Chalkboards and notebooks are increasingly giving way to PCs and tablets - even in developing countries. But how early do children need to start using IT? What if a child wants to become a robotics engineer? We look at how education is adapting to the latest technology in order to prepare students for the world of work.

*Taking the tablets in Kenya*

In some parts of Kenya education is still very basic and drop-out rates are high. But one project has found that investing in tablets and apps can be a way to re-engage students in their lessons, so they have started introducing them to schools. This has affected student attendance and performance.

E-limu is the Swahili word for education - and it is also the name of an app for schoolchildren. It was invented by a group of software developers who want to bring high-tech learning to one of Kenya's poorest communities. This app is supposed to grab students' attention and encourage them to learn.

In Kenya, almost half of school students drop out at the age of 14, with a very basic education. But Nivi Mukherjee, the founder of this pilot project, says that if learning is made more interactive and engaging. It might motivate children to stay longer in school. 

"Now instead of just boring text books we have added animation, games, songs, videos and quizzes to make the entire learning process really fun, interactive and engaging for children," she says.

The pilot project was launched in Kawangware, one of the poorest parts of Nairobi which is notorious for drugs, prostitution and crime. Most of the students here are lucky to be in school at all. Marceline Keyanda, who is 13 years old, is preparing to sit her final primary exams. She says that apps are more exciting and easier to understand than reading textbooks.

"Now instead of teachers coming with a lot of text books they just come with tablets. When you have a question, when the teacher is not around, you just click on the tablet and you get the question which you have asked," she says.

There are many reasons why Kenyan students drop out of school early. The country's education system needs 80,000 more teachers at the moment and students are crammed into tiny classrooms all competing for the attention of one teacher. Many students have short attention spans. E-limu hopes that by using interactive apps the children's ability to concentrate will improve. 

The pilot project is in its early stages. One teacher who has been using it in the classroom thinks the tablet is a success. He has seen students get better results and a significant improvement in attendance records.

"The tablets have given our pupils the courage and confidence to come to school. And that has enhanced performance and attendance, and the total marks of the pupils. In education as a whole they have helped the pupils score better," says Philson Madegwa.

Nivi Mukherjee believes that the app has a wider relevance for society as a whole. It is not only to improve the school curriculum and the desire to learn: she would like to teach children about the environment, social justice, human rights and finance to make them better citizens. 

"We want to teach children to grow up to be participants of the 21st century economy, we want them to be better leaders, to be smarter voters and hopefully in the future we would like to see children all over Africa and maybe other parts of the world using this kind of device," she says.

Mukherjee hopes that this new app will revolutionise learning in Africa and bridge the gap between the continent and other countries' standards.

*Early coding*

So clearly technology has an important place in education. But how early do children have to start in order to learn programming? In Estonia it is very young indeed. The government has recently launched a nationwide code-writing scheme, aiming to encourage a whole new generation to get smart when it comes to using technology."


Via João Greno Brogueira
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

Using Information Technology is definitely effective. But our system and teachers must be ready to accept the change.

more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Balkrishna Bokil from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

20 World-Class Presentation Experts Share Their Top Tips

20 World-Class Presentation Experts Share Their Top Tips | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it
Have you ever sat through a presentation that seemed to slog on and on? Presenters that are disorganized, dwell on trivial information and give long winded explanations that lead nowhere? Too many presentations are afflicted by poor planning and poor visuals. The audience who come to see these presentations, pay attention [...]

Via Baiba Svenca
more...
johanna krijnsen's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:15 AM

presentations - getting it right

Gary Harwell's curator insight, August 18, 2014 3:29 PM

What type of presentations are we using?

Tim Brook's curator insight, August 22, 2014 6:18 AM

There's loads of this kind of stuff out there but this one actually has some good advice!

Rescooped by Balkrishna Bokil from Teaching in the XXI Century
Scoop.it!

Learning World looks at how IT is boosting education worldwide - learning world

"In the modern world education is increasingly technological. From sophisticated robotics...

euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe
Subscribe for your daily dose of international news, curated and explained:http://eurone.ws/10ZCK4a
Euronews is available in 13 other languages:http://eurone.ws/17moBCU

http://www.euronews.com/2013/06/07/le...
In the modern world education is increasingly technological. From sophisticated robotics engineering to tablets in schools, all around the world teachers are upgrading their educational tools in order to give students the skills they will need later on. So how does this change things in the classroom?

Chalkboards and notebooks are increasingly giving way to PCs and tablets - even in developing countries. But how early do children need to start using IT? What if a child wants to become a robotics engineer? We look at how education is adapting to the latest technology in order to prepare students for the world of work.

*Taking the tablets in Kenya*

In some parts of Kenya education is still very basic and drop-out rates are high. But one project has found that investing in tablets and apps can be a way to re-engage students in their lessons, so they have started introducing them to schools. This has affected student attendance and performance.

E-limu is the Swahili word for education - and it is also the name of an app for schoolchildren. It was invented by a group of software developers who want to bring high-tech learning to one of Kenya's poorest communities. This app is supposed to grab students' attention and encourage them to learn.

In Kenya, almost half of school students drop out at the age of 14, with a very basic education. But Nivi Mukherjee, the founder of this pilot project, says that if learning is made more interactive and engaging. It might motivate children to stay longer in school. 

"Now instead of just boring text books we have added animation, games, songs, videos and quizzes to make the entire learning process really fun, interactive and engaging for children," she says.

The pilot project was launched in Kawangware, one of the poorest parts of Nairobi which is notorious for drugs, prostitution and crime. Most of the students here are lucky to be in school at all. Marceline Keyanda, who is 13 years old, is preparing to sit her final primary exams. She says that apps are more exciting and easier to understand than reading textbooks.

"Now instead of teachers coming with a lot of text books they just come with tablets. When you have a question, when the teacher is not around, you just click on the tablet and you get the question which you have asked," she says.

There are many reasons why Kenyan students drop out of school early. The country's education system needs 80,000 more teachers at the moment and students are crammed into tiny classrooms all competing for the attention of one teacher. Many students have short attention spans. E-limu hopes that by using interactive apps the children's ability to concentrate will improve. 

The pilot project is in its early stages. One teacher who has been using it in the classroom thinks the tablet is a success. He has seen students get better results and a significant improvement in attendance records.

"The tablets have given our pupils the courage and confidence to come to school. And that has enhanced performance and attendance, and the total marks of the pupils. In education as a whole they have helped the pupils score better," says Philson Madegwa.

Nivi Mukherjee believes that the app has a wider relevance for society as a whole. It is not only to improve the school curriculum and the desire to learn: she would like to teach children about the environment, social justice, human rights and finance to make them better citizens. 

"We want to teach children to grow up to be participants of the 21st century economy, we want them to be better leaders, to be smarter voters and hopefully in the future we would like to see children all over Africa and maybe other parts of the world using this kind of device," she says.

Mukherjee hopes that this new app will revolutionise learning in Africa and bridge the gap between the continent and other countries' standards.

*Early coding*

So clearly technology has an important place in education. But how early do children have to start in order to learn programming? In Estonia it is very young indeed. The government has recently launched a nationwide code-writing scheme, aiming to encourage a whole new generation to get smart when it comes to using technology."


Via João Greno Brogueira
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

Using Information Technology is definitely effective. But our system and teachers must be ready to accept the change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Balkrishna Bokil
Scoop.it!

School dropout rate high in slums: Study - The New Indian Express

School dropout rate high in slums: Study - The New Indian Express | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it
School dropout rate high in slums: Study
The New Indian Express
The sample survey covered 2,852 children from non-slum areas in Puducherry, 1,333 from non-slum areas in Karaikal and 679 children in various slums in the Union Territory.
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

We must think of providing open schooling to such needy students.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Balkrishna Bokil from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Are student apprenticeships education’s future?

Are student apprenticeships education’s future? | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it

"America’s current approach to academics is not only failing the students who drop out of high school. Almost half the students who graduate and enroll in a four-year college leave without a diploma, the report notes. For minority and low-income students, even fewer finish college. 

 

The recommended solution: Multiple pathways to adulthood, with employers playing a greater role in shaping those paths."

 


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

The education system must collaborate with corporate sector for.......

(1) Developing infrastructure.

(2) Developing industry- need-based curricula.

(3) Developing short duration courses suitable to students.

(4) Placement of students in various industries, and

(5) Mentorship programme for students.

 

The challenge is.....Are our educational institutions ready for this ? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Balkrishna Bokil
Scoop.it!

Alastair Creelman: Open education - drop in rather than drop out

Alastair Creelman: Open education - drop in rather than drop out | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it

A common criticism of the current wave of more or less open courses is that there is a high drop-out rate with sometimes only 10-20% of students completing the course. In the traditional education system this is seen as a sign of abject failure but should we apply the same principles in judging the impact of open education? Does it really matter who completes the course or not since the motivation for studying via MOOCs and suchlike is not to gain academic credits but simply to learn. If only part of the MOOC is relevant to your current interests you will study that part and then move on. This is not a case of dropping out but more like dipping into a good book to read the parts that interest you.

Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

Good article which discusses the views held by followers of the formal educational system. These are the challenges on which we have to work. This is not easy but not impossible !

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Balkrishna Bokil
Scoop.it!

Reasons to Drop Out—and to Stay - Education Week News

Reasons to Drop Out—and to Stay - Education Week News | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it
Reasons to Drop Out—and to Stay
Education Week News
If students drop out of high school because they are bored and don't see what they are learning as relevant to their future, it can be tough to get them interested in more of the same.
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

The teachers should become educators. They must focus more on learning (of every student) than on teaching. They must see the world beyond the classroom and use their observations for teaching in interesting ways.

This article will help teachers to build that insight.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Balkrishna Bokil from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic

The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it

Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test. But assessments do have value, and an important place in our learning structure. By measuring what students are learning, we as teachers can look at how we are approaching different subjects, materials, and even different students. The handy infographic takes a look at different types of assessments and their attributes and questions. Keep reading to learn more.


Via Dennis T OConnor
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

Can be used in teacher training.

The teachers must use various types of assessment for evaluating the learning outcomes.

more...
Limitless Learning Limited's curator insight, July 31, 2013 5:47 AM

A useful summary of how assessement is used in education to inform and demonstrate learning.

Shea Stehm's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:41 PM

Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test. But assessments do have value, and an important place in our learning structure. By measuring what students are learning, we as teachers can look at how we are approaching different subjects, materials, and even different students.

Dee KC's curator insight, August 6, 2013 3:25 PM

following the DfE's assessing without levels guidance this looks like  god place to start when reviewing how you measure progress

Scooped by Balkrishna Bokil
Scoop.it!

State making progress with decrease in dropout rate - Exponent-telegram

State making progress with decrease in dropout rate - Exponent-telegram | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it
State making progress with decrease in dropout rate
Exponent-telegram
By offering such programs and alternatives to the students, the school systems are having great success in slashing the dropout rates.
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

Useful for brainstorming. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Balkrishna Bokil
Scoop.it!

Number of 'Drop Out' Students in Assam's Karbi Anglong District on ...

Number of 'Drop Out' Students in Assam's Karbi Anglong District on ... | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it
The rosy portrait painted by the district authority of the SSA was established to be erroneous by Miss Rita Kramsapi a scholar of Tata Institute of Social Science after conducting a thorough research in the western part of the ...
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

This is usual experience!  One can not depend on mere statistics. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Balkrishna Bokil
Scoop.it!

Engaging Students Before They Drop Out - Teach Amazing!

Engaging Students Before They Drop Out - Teach Amazing! | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it
Engaging Students Before They Drop Out - Check out Teach Amazing for educational technology, web 2.0, and great tips to teach amazing! (RT@markbrumley: How to use games, interactive tools and eBooks to gain student interest!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Balkrishna Bokil from SCUP Links
Scoop.it!

A Clear Path to Payment @ U. Illinois

A Clear Path to Payment @ U. Illinois | Non-Formal Education | Scoop.it

In 2008, our USFSCO leadership team—consisting of an assistant director, five associate directors, two directors, and the executive director—recognized the unique changes in the economic environment, families' decreased resources for paying college expenses, and the limited purchasing power of financial aid. We asked parents and students how we could minimize the impact of these issues on students, so they would not feel they had to drop out.

 

In their conversations with us, students and parents expressed their desire for additional payment options, more proactive outreach regarding services, and improved educational support systems for financial literacy on each of our three campuses, so that students could more easily address their financial obligations to the university. Over the course of the next two years, our leadership team developed six different strategies to address these concerns:


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Balkrishna Bokil's insight:

This experiment will show a path to many organisations which are facing the  problem of dropping out of students. Message----Go to the people and they will give you the innovative ideas. You must be ready to accept them and have a courage to implement them. People have problems and they have solutions too.

more...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 8, 2013 7:05 AM

"ANDREA PELLEGRINI is assistant director, Student Money Manage-ment Center, University of Illinois. JOSEPH SHROYER is associate director, University Student Financial Services and Cashier Operations. JUDITH FLINK, executive director, USFSCO, contributed to the article.