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Non-Fiction Prose
A Basic Application of Narrative
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Narrative Genre I

Narrative Genre  I | Non-Fiction Prose | Scoop.it

The Narrative Genre embodies many forms.  They are the Autobiographical Essay, The Literacy Narrative, The Historical Narrative, and the Biographical Narrative. 

 

Narrative Nonfiction is information based on fact that is presented in a format which tells a story.

 

Essays are a short literary composition that reflects the author’s outlook or point. A short literary composition on a particular theme or subject, usually in prose and generally analytic, speculative, or interpretative.

 

A Biography is a written account of another person’s life.

 

 

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Narrative where does it come from: III

Narrative where does it come from:  III | Non-Fiction Prose | Scoop.it

A narrative is a constructive format (as a work of speech, writing, song, film, television, video games, photography or theatre) that describes a sequence of non-fictional or fictional events. The word derives from the Latin verb narrare, "to recount", and is related to the adjective gnarus, "knowing" or "skilled".[1]

The word "story" may be used as a synonym of "narrative". It can also be used to refer to the sequence of events described in a narrative. A narrative can also be told by a character within a larger narrative. An important part of narration is the narrative mode, the set of methods used to communicate the narrative through a process narration (see also "Narrative Aesthetics" below).

Along with exposition, argumentation and description, narration, broadly defined, is one of four rhetorical modes of discourse. More narrowly defined, it is the fiction-writing mode whereby the narrator communicates directly to the reader.

Stories are an important aspect of culture. Many works of art and most works of literature tell stories; indeed, most of the humanities involve stories. Owen Flanagan of Duke University, a leading consciousness researcher, writes that "Evidence strongly suggests that humans in all cultures come to cast their own identity in some sort of narrative form. We are inveterate storytellers."[2]

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The Holy Bible as an Historical Narrative

The Holy Bible as an Historical Narrative | Non-Fiction Prose | Scoop.it

The seven dispensational periodsDispensationalism seeks to address what many see as opposing theologies between the Old Testament and New Testament. Its name comes from the fact that it sees biblical history as best understood in light of a series of dispensations in the Bible. Most dispensationalists cite seven dispensations although this is not a critical or foundational factor to the theology:

the dispensation of innocence (Gen 1:1–3:7), prior to Adam's fall,of conscience (Gen 3:8–8:22), Adam to Noah,of government (Gen 9:1–11:32), Noah to Abraham,of patriarchal rule (Gen 12:1–Exod 19:25), Abraham to Moses,of the Mosaic Law (Exod 20:1–Acts 2:4), Moses to Christ,of grace (Acts 2:4–Rev 20:3—except for Hyperdispensationalists and Ultradispensationalists), the current church age, andof a literal, earthly 1,000-year Millennial Kingdom that has yet to come but soon will (Rev 20:4–20:6).

John Nelson Darby did not consider the Garden of Eden to represent a dispensation, and listed only six.

Each one of these dispensations is said to represent a different way in which God deals with man, specifically a different test for man. "These periods are marked off in Scripture by some change in God's method of dealing with mankind, in respect to two questions: of sin, and of man's responsibility," explained C. I. Scofield. "Each of the dispensations may be regarded as a new test of the natural man, and each ends in judgment—marking his utter failure in every dispensation."

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Narrative Film V

Narrative film

 

 <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3UC4Km8pWmo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

 

 

 

 <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/31476392?title=0&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;byline=0&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/31476392">LILEA NARRATIVE // 7eme SOUFFLE // Official Movie Clip</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/lileanarrative">LILEA NARRATIVE</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

 

Movies are the most distinctly modern art form. They began in the 1890s, and by 1910 had become a major industry, a new form of commercial leisure. Movies had also developed, by 1910, a distinctly "American" style. This assignment explores the development of movies.

The very first movies, developed in America by Thomas Edison, were intended as aids to industrial training. Viewers saw them by looking into a machine, the "kinetoscope," and turning a handle. A continuous loop of flexible film would pass across the shutter. Edison believed that all inventions should have some practical, money making application. He expected movies would be most useful in industrial training, teaching workers to do repetitious factory jobs.

Though he and his team fooled around with the first films they made, shooting scenes of kissing, sneezing, and prizefighting, it took Edison a surprisingly long time to figure out that moving pictures would be best as an entertainment medium. The kinetoscope never caught on with manufacturers. It flourished as a novelty in the 1890s, with a slightly seamy reputation.

By 1900 a number of separate inventors had realized that projecting kinetoscope images on a screen would make the medium far more attractive

Still, movie makers had a hard time figuring out what the new medium was best suited for. The very early projected movies—like this simple film on the left, of a train moving upriver towards Niagara Falls—often showed audiences things they had read or heard about but never seen. Film producers called them "actualities." These clips had a surprisingly powerful effect on audiences because moving images were so novel. When shown images of a train rushing towards the camera, for example, moviegoers jumped out of the way.

"Actualities" showed real events, like street scenes or speeches. They frequently presented news footage—things like the sunken battleship Maine or scenes from the Spanish American War, as advertised in this 1898 poster. They look unremarkable to us, but for turn of the century audiences they brought distant times and spaces together in new ways. Now movie audiences could see places thousands of miles away. In the first era of the projected motion pictures (roughly 1897-1905) most films were either documentaries or "actualities." You can see many examples of these at the American Memory web site.

But not all the movies focus on "actualities." Many of the early films showed a more playful side of popular culture. As we will see, they also began telling more elaborate stories

The exercise here is about movie "narrative"—the ways movies tell stories. We will explore the development of modern movie narrative and you can try your hand at editing a silent film.

Begin Here

When you have completed the exercise, Consider the following questions in your web journal. You should describe the process of editing a film and refer to the films described in the exercise.

Which way of telling a story is more true to life? Why?

Which is the more "natural" way to tell a story?

What are the implications of modern movie narrative? What has it done to the way we see the world?

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The Historical Narrative II

The Historical Narrative interest me the most as it speaks about true events and I like the truth, but also history.  As, History in many ways simultaneously connects us to the present.

 

This semester in this class we read, two Narritve stories. 
They were Margets Atwoods, True North and Henry David Thoreau's Where I lived.  In both these text we come into contact with living in  nature.  That is , both living with nature to trying to find where it truly exist, is it an actual place or does it only exist in ones mine; do we embrace its habitat or run from it?

 

 

In True North by Margaret Atwood, Margaret takes us on a journey through her childhood by showing how it aligns to her adulthood and the geographical location of her upbringing. To her it is a True North. As the result of evolutionary change, she is forced to asked the question, Where is the North? Where does it begin? (p. 96) This question is one that resonates in the mind of the reader as we find our way through the story. As one begin to speculate where is the True North. Is it in the location being described by Atwood, or is there some other place not seen by the natural eye. In many ways this is what Atwood begins to allude to, leaving an ambigous question in the mind of the reader as to what she truly means. The story is of the narrative and descriptive genres' which in some ways takes on the elements of a travel log.

What becomes interesting as Atwood narrates the story, is how she layers the content with the past versus her current experiences and observations relative to cultural change in the north. Central to this theme is the idea is how she talks about the environmental structure due to the development of new technologies and acid rain (p. 99)

Another interesting part of the structure is how she speaks of the True North in relation to the landscape and its symbolism of life, death, survival and the over habitual culture. She emphasis an interestng paralel with the new and old. That while they are living in the new modern north, it is likened to living in the olden days because in the True North, there are things that remind them of the olden time and that are still uncivilized or modernized; although, they deal with moderns environmental interruptions such as state government officer invading the property and polluting it by killing the dear leaving the carcasses and mess behind that makes it feel like a common slum or ghetto (p. 103). One of the best analogies in the story is her analysis of the woods. She writes, "Don't get lost", as speaking indepth about the dangers of the woods, and forest the hardships to be faced by the inexperenced traveler through the woods. "Don't get lost" because you may not survive is what she is warning civilization of (p. 100).

Questions:

The roads-a no mans land in norhern canada-the roads are civilization-owned by the collective human (we) and off the road is the (other) (p. 100)What does everyone think of Atwoods comparison of the north with the unconcious mind and dreaming as opposed to the south?What do you make of Atwoods description of survival in the north woods, in comparsion to that of Thoreaus'. Should we fear nature as Atwood suggest or embrace it as Thoreau does. Is it dangerous or is the story a warning about getting too close to nature, as nature may "take you as her own".The sudsbury-Is it a metaphor? Sometimes went this way and the trees became smaller. It was a magical place. In those days it was wringer washers and clotheslines. What is the period or decade she speaks of when she says "back then".

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Story Telling IV

Storytelling was probably one of the earliest forms of entertainment. As noted by Owen Flanagan, narrative may also refer to psychological processes in self-identity, memory and meaning-making

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Hae27dm8Uqw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

Semiotics begins with the individual building blocks of meaning called signs; and semantics, the way in which signs are combined into codes to transmit messages. This is part of a general communication system using both verbal and non-verbal elements, and creating a discourse with different modalities and forms

 

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Writing is Freedom - Prose: Honey Bunches of oats

WritingIsFreedom.com is A Community for Writers and Readers of Poetry and Prose (#prose by Daniel91: Honey Bunches of oats http://t.co/GOZZlt53...)...
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Prose and protest | The St. Petersburg Times | The leading English-language newspaper in St. Petersburg

Prose and protest | The St. Petersburg Times | The leading English-language newspaper in St. Petersburg | Non-Fiction Prose | Scoop.it
Prose and protest | The St. Petersburg Times | The leading English-language newspaper in St.
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