Non-Equilibrium S...
Follow
15.9K views | +17 today
Non-Equilibrium Social Science
This is the Scoop.it! for NESS - Non-Equilibrium Social Sciences. For more about the NESS community please go to our website http://www.nessnet.eu
Curated by NESS
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Inequality Has Been Going On Forever ... but That Doesn’t Mean It’s Inevitable

Inequality Has Been Going On Forever ... but That Doesn’t Mean It’s Inevitable | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
We have been living with rising income inequality for so long that it has come to seem inevitable. It doesn’t have to be.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

The greater market integration of the European Higher Education Area may have unequal benefits across countries and disciplines

The greater market integration of the European Higher Education Area may have unequal benefits across countries and disciplines | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Since the late 1990s, European higher education has moved towards greater integration, increasing student mobility and more comparable national systems. The past two decades have also seen a gradual rise in the role of market elements in higher education. Pedro Teixeira finds that this greater integration may be leading to a greater concentration of funding across certain countries and academic disciplines. He writes that an EU that is increasingly concerned with global relevance may now be more willing to concentrate resources in a smaller number of elite institutions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

POSITIVE LINKING: How Networks and Incentives Can Revolutionise the World

POSITIVE LINKING: How Networks and Incentives Can Revolutionise the World | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Talk by Paul Ormerod, from the EU project "NESS - Non-Equilibrium Social Science", at OECD, April 2014.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Global land cover change from 8000 BP to -50 BP

This animation shows the global pattern of human land use over the last eight thousand years, a time when human populations began expanding following the origins of agriculture. The earliest areas of human land use are in Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent areas of southwest Asia, followed by increasing areas of land use in China, India, and Europe. Watch for the areas of intensive land use developing in India, especially along the Ganges River plane, and in Northern China along the lower Yellow and Yangtze rivers. As time goes on, you will see areas of land use developing in South America, along the Andes, and in Africa, especially in the Sahel region. By classical times, land use in Europe is very intense with up to 60% of the land under human uses, but we start to see fluctuations around this time too, with some areas abandoned corresponding with wars, famine, and other historical events that affected human populations. As time continues through the Middle Ages and Renaissance, land use in Europe and Chine increase greatly following the development of cities and towns. Now pay careful attention to South America. Following the first contact with Europeans around 1500, nearly 90% of the indigenous people of the Americas were killed, mainly by disease. This collapse in populations led to massive regrowth of natural vegetation, especially forests in the Amazon, Andes, and Mesoamerica. As we race towards modern times we see the settlement of the Americas and Australia by Europeans spreading across the continents, and the development of the human-dominated world we have today.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

In Defense of Google Flu Trends

In Defense of Google Flu Trends | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

In 2008, Google released an experiment called Flu Trends, which attempted to predict the prevalence of the flu from searches that users made for about 40 flu-related queries.

Based on the data up to that point in time, Flu Trends worked really well. The Centers for Disease Control, which had been involved in shaping how it functioned, liked the data that it produced. 

(...)

If the system failed, it did so only in the outsize dreams of Big Data acolytes.

(...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Big Data: Are we making a big mistake?

Big data: are we making a big mistake? Big data is a vague term for a massive phenomenon that has rapidly become an obsession with entrepreneurs, scientists, governments and the media Five years ag...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Narrative Psychotherapy: the use of traditional fairy tales to enhance psychological well-being and growth

Oral narrative strategies have rarely been applied in the positive psychology domain. Traditional folk and fairy tales are concerned with several concepts that are now scientifically investigated by research on positive psychology, such as resilience, self-realization, personal growth and meaning in life. The aim of this pilot study was to apply a new narrative approach based on fairy tales (Märchen, tales of magic, rise tales) told, discussed, and written in a group context for the purpose of promoting psychological well-being and growth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution

Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

This paper describes the deployment of a large-scale study designed to measure human interactions across a variety of communication channels, with high temporal resolution and spanning multiple years—the Copenhagen Networks Study. Specifically, we collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, location, and background information (personality, demographics, health, politics) for a densely connected population of 1 000 individuals, using state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. Here we provide an overview of the related work and describe the motivation and research agenda driving the study. Additionally, the paper details the data-types measured, and the technical infrastructure in terms of both backend and phone software, as well as an outline of the deployment procedures. We document the participant privacy procedures and their underlying principles. The paper is concluded with early results from data analysis, illustrating the importance of multi-channel high-resolution approach to data collection.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

5 big EU tech projects you should follow

5 big EU tech projects you should follow | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Robots, brains, the EU’s got it all.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Dynamics of Information Spreading in Online Social Networks

Online social networks (OSNs) are changing the way information spreads throughout the Internet. A deep understanding of information spreading in OSNs leads to both social and commercial benefits. In this paper, dynamics of information spreading (e.g., how fast and widely the information spreads against time) in OSNs are characterized, and a general and accurate model based on Interactive Markov Chains (IMCs) and mean-field theory is established. This model shows tight relations between network topology and information spreading in OSNs, e.g., the information spreading ability is positively related to the heterogeneity of degree distributions whereas negatively related to the degree-degree correlations in general. Further, the model is extended to feature the time-varying user behavior and the ever-changing information popularity. By leveraging the mean-field theory, the model is able to characterize the complicated information spreading process (e.g., the dynamic patterns of information spreading) with six parameters. Extensive evaluations based on Renren's data set illustrate the accuracy of the model, e.g., it can characterize dynamic patterns of video sharing in Renren precisely and predict future spreading dynamics successfully.


Via Bernard Ryefield
more...
Rescooped by NESS from Aggregate Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Information: A Personal Synthesis

This article is an attempt to capture, in a reasonable space, some of the major developments and currents of thought in information theory and the relations between them. I have particularly tried to include changes in the views of key authors in the field. The domains addressed range from mathematical-categorial, philosophical and computational approaches to systems, causal-compositional, biological and religious approaches and messaging theory. I have related key concepts in each domain to my non-standard extension of logic to real processes that I call Logic in Reality (LIR). The result is not another attempt at a General Theory of Information such as that of Burgin, or a Unified Theory of Information like that of Hofkirchner. It is not a compendium of papers presented at a conference, more or less unified around a particular theme. It is rather a highly personal, limited synthesis which nonetheless may facilitate comparison of insights, including contradictory ones, from different lines of inquiry. As such, it may be an example of the concept proposed by Marijuan, still little developed, of the recombination of knowledge. Like the best of the work to which it refers, the finality of this synthesis is the possible contribution that an improved understanding of the nature and dynamics of information may make to the ethical development of the information society.

 

Information: A Personal Synthesis
by Joseph Brenner
Information 2014, 5(1), 134-170; doi:10.3390/info5010134
http://www.mdpi.com/2078-2489/5/1/134/ ;


Via Complexity Digest, António F Fonseca
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 10:57 AM

All information that we receive from the universe that is around us is second hand.  It is possible to alter and shift them out of our own volition or of the volition of someone else, provided that we're either caught unawares or allowing it to happen just as it is theoretically possible to shift the universe around us, so that we experience something different than what would ordinarily happen (again, only theoretically, not necessarily in actuality).  The universe is out there, I think, just as we're most certainly apart of it.  There are laws to this place as well which influence and effect our abilities to act, our perception of the choices that we have and the choices that we actually are left with at the end of the day, when all's said and told.  We are just receptors, analyzers and synthesizers of information with our biological bodies.  We are all slaves, ultimately, to our biology, our circumstances and the consequences of our actions.

 

Just my two cents on information.

 

Think about it.

António F Fonseca's curator insight, April 12, 2:46 AM

Brenner and Daniel Cohnitz have a very good book about the subject "Information and Information Flow" that covers almost all aspects of Information Theory. Unfortunatelly the 'Matecmatical Information Theory' of Jan Kahre didn't have yet the same attention.

Rescooped by NESS from 'Next Economy and Wealth'
Scoop.it!

The Future of Money Infographic | Visual.ly

The Future of Money Infographic | Visual.ly | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
How social and mobile technologies are changing the way people earn,
manage and spend money.

Via Ferananda
more...
Ferananda's curator insight, April 14, 6:58 PM

Nice #infographic about #futureofmoney you can get a glance of how much is happening in the field.  Still money and #cashless means just that -no cash- yet...its movement towards changing rules. 

Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

ECCS'14 - submissions for contributed talks/posters

ECCS'14 - submissions for contributed talks/posters | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Submissions for contributed talks/posters will be open until April 15 2014. Acceptance will be communicated on April 30 2014 at the latest. Contributions must be submitted through EasyChair.org at the page https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=eccs14

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Étoile Platform
Scoop.it!

Checking in with Portugal's big projects to support technology use in education

Checking in with Portugal's big projects to support technology use in education | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

As part of my job at the World Bank helping to advise governments on what works, and what doesn't, related to the use of new technologies in education around the world, especially in middle- and low-income countries, I spend a fair amount of time trying to track down information about projects -- sometimes quite large in scale and invariably described as 'innovative' in some way -- that were announced with much fanfare which received a great deal of press attention, but about which very little information is subsequently made widely available. (...)

by MICHAEL TRUCANO


Via Jorge Louçã
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Using Friends as Sensors to Detect Global-Scale Contagious Outbreaks

Using Friends as Sensors to Detect Global-Scale Contagious Outbreaks | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Recent research has focused on the monitoring of global–scale online data for improved detection of epidemics, mood patterns, movements in the stock market political revolutions, box-office revenues, consumer behaviour and many other important phenomena. However, privacy considerations and the sheer scale of data available online are quickly making global monitoring infeasible, and existing methods do not take full advantage of local network structure to identify key nodes for monitoring. Here, we develop a model of the contagious spread of information in a global-scale, publicly-articulated social network and show that a simple method can yield not just early detection, but advance warning of contagious outbreaks. In this method, we randomly choose a small fraction of nodes in the network and then we randomly choose a friend of each node to include in a group for local monitoring. Using six months of data from most of the full Twittersphere, we show that this friend group is more central in the network and it helps us to detect viral outbreaks of the use of novel hashtags about 7 days earlier than we could with an equal-sized randomly chosen group. Moreover, the method actually works better than expected due to network structure alone because highly central actors are both more active and exhibit increased diversity in the information they transmit to others. These results suggest that local monitoring is not just more efficient, but also more effective, and it may be applied to monitor contagious processes in global–scale networks.


by  Manuel Garcia-Herranz, Esteban Moro, Manuel Cebrian, Nicholas A. Christakis, James H. Fowler

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Interview with Sony Kapour of Re-Define - at Fores Think Tank

Sony Kapoor and Re-Define are among the most fresh thinkers within economic reforms, with a strong focus on how Europe can get out of the crisis, how climate change can be halted and how banks can become more functional. Here, Sony presents his "carbon stress test" for banks, how green investments become lucrative and not least - how they happen.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

How big data is transforming public services – expert views

How big data is transforming public services – expert views | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

We asked our experts how government can handle big data better, and mitigate the risks of privacy breaches.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Social Evolution: New Horizons

Cooperation is a widespread natural phenomenon yet current evolutionary thinking is dominated by the paradigm of selfish competition. Recent advanced in many fronts of Biology and Non-linear Physics are helping to bring cooperation to its proper place. In this contribution, the most important controversies and open research avenues in the field of social evolution are reviewed. It is argued that a novel theory of social evolution must integrate the concepts of the science of Complex Systems with those of the Darwinian tradition. Current gene-centric approaches should be reviewed and com- plemented with evidence from multilevel phenomena (group selection), the constrains given by the non-linear nature of biological dynamical systems and the emergent nature of dissipative phenomena.


Chapter in forthcoming open access book "Frontiers in Ecology, Evolution and Complexity"

by Octavio Miramontes, Og DeSouza

arXiv:1404.6267 [q-bio.PE]

more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 28, 12:14 PM

Indeed, one example of this cooperative method in evolution that springs to mind is the coevolution of dogs and humans.  By being domesticated, dogs earned themselves protection from the elements and a reliable source of food, water and even medical care in case of injury.  Humans gained more sleep, due to the watchfulness of dogs at night, and thus, gained a greater degree of cognitive functionality that otherwise wouldn't have existed had dogs not been kept with us.

 

Sometimes, the cooperative option is the selfish option, and vice versa.

 

Imagine if political leaders, rather than competing with each other for relative power and pride within the society, worked together to solve actual common problems in our society?  What if nations worked together to solve common problems in humanity, amongst humanity, sucht that we're focused on survival and well being, rather than wealth or relative power?

 

What is so difficult and onerous about these changes?

 

I don't understand.

 

Think about it.

Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Science in a Complex World: A small group of Santa Fe researchers changed economic thinking

Science in a Complex World: A small group of Santa Fe researchers changed economic thinking | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Economics is a stately subject, prim and respectable, one that’s altered little since its modern foundations were laid in Victorian times. Now it is changing rapidly, thanks to the work of a small group of researchers over the last two decades in New Mexico. (...)

 

By W. Brian Arthur

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Advice for those who want to change the world

Advice for those who want to change the world | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The world needs changing in all sorts of urgent ways: the great question is how to do it. The most popular and appealing answer has long been that one should try to write a book, retreat to a mountain-top, lay down one’s thoughts with passion and cogency, try hard to sell as many copies as possible and wait for change to emerge.

Immense prestige has surrounded this activity for the last 200 years at least and it can seem, from a distance, that it has been deeply successful as well. Some books have undeniably made a splash (Das Capital, Thus Spake Zarathustra, Silent Spring, The God Delusion…) (...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Review by David Hales - Dynamics among Nations: The evolution of legitimacy and development in modern states

Review by David Hales - Dynamics among Nations: The evolution of legitimacy and development in modern states | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

A book by Hilton L. Root. The MIT Press. 2013, Hardcover, 332 pages. Reviewed by David Hales (University of Szeged, Hungary) 

 

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, prominent Western Liberal intellectuals declared the “end of history”. The West had won. Liberal democracy, driven by open markets and global capital, was inevitable and the historic destiny of all nations. The only question was how long it would take them to get there. Hence international development became a process, for the West, of helping all nations along the road towards the final utopia. A utopia the Western powers had already attained.

(...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

How Humans Evolved to Cope with City Crowds

How Humans Evolved to Cope with City Crowds | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
For over a hundred thousand years, humans evolved in small, roving bands of a few dozen people. But then, about ten thousand years ago, we started living in cities that were far bigger than any tribe or band. Our minds had to change to cope with the population overload.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Étoile Platform
Scoop.it!

ECCS14 - Submissions for contributed talks/posters will be open until April 30

ECCS14 - Submissions for contributed talks/posters will be open until April 30 | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Submissions for contributed talks/posters will be open until April 30 2014 (extended)

www.eccs14.eu

Acceptance will be communicated on May 10 2014 at the latest.

Contributions must be submitted through EasyChair.org at the page https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=eccs14.

Please upload one (1) page of extended abstracts (figures/ref included) in pdf. Longer contributions will not be considered.

Poster proposals in the same form can be also sent to abstracts@eccs14.eu.

We are currently exploring the possibility of a contributed volume of proceedings. Persons interested in the publication of proceedings, please send an email to submission@eccs14.eu.

ECCS’14 will be a major international conference and event in the area of complex systems and interdisciplinary science in general. It will offer unique opportunities to study novel scientific approaches in a multitude of application areas.
The conference will take place at the IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca campus; all IMT structures are located in the historical center of Lucca and make up an integrated campus for advanced studies and research.

The conference will cover a broad range of subjects on all aspects of Complex Systems, as reflected by the following conference tracks:
Foundations of Complex Systems
Information and Communication Technologies
Infrastructures, Planning and Environment
Biological Complexity
Language, Linguistics Cognition and Social Systems
Economics and Finance

To know more about ECCS14 conference, download the leaflet: http://www.eccs14.eu/images/IMT/eccs14leaflet.pdf


Via Jorge Louçã
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Massive Data Flow: Understanding the Complex Dynamics of the Web

The Web is perhaps the most complex system that we know. Its massive scale, complex dynamism, open richness, and social character mean that it may be more profitable to study it using tools and concepts appropriate for understanding nervous systems, organisms, ecosystems and society, rather than approaches more traditionally employed to engineer technology. Simultaneously, the scientists trying to understand this wide array of complex natural systems may have much to gain by considering the emergingstudy of the Web.

 

Massive Data Flow: Understanding the Complex Dynamics of the Web
Workshop at the ACM Web Science Conference 2014 (http://www.websci14.org )
10:00 - 18:00, June 23rd, 2014
Indiana University, Bloomington

http://sacral.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/event/MDF_WebSci/ ;


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Joseph E. Stiglitz asks what role government should play as economic restructuring proceeds

Joseph E. Stiglitz asks what role government should play as economic restructuring proceeds | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Many of China’s problems today stem from too much market and too little government. Or, to put it another way, while the government is clearly doing some things that it should not, it is also not doing some things that it should.
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 2, 2:03 PM

Unfortunately, the CCP quashed the Populists under Bo Xilai and put into power a conservative who only seems concerned with tightening things under him while neglecting to effectively tend to the problems within his society and geographical territory.  Lots of sword rattling against Japan, the Philippines, and Vietnam; lots of putting down dissidents and Tibetan/Uigher nationalists.  There are some high profile corruption cases being put out.  However, nothing systemic or far reaching or sustainable seems to be being done for the sake of the people of China.  One would wonder what would indeed happen to the reigns of the CCP if they let market liberalization allocate resources out of the hands of the CCP members, such that new factions take ownership.  China is not a country that has historically done well when a multitude of factions are competing for the centralized control of the government.  One can only shudder at the implications for the rest of the world's economy and geo-political/social-political orders as a result of that kind of collapse.