Non-Equilibrium Social Science
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Non-Equilibrium Social Science
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Why Nudge?

Renowned public thinker Cass Sunstein defends his groundbreaking nudge theory. When the state seeks to influence our choices in “our best interests” is this liberty-infringing meddling, or simply good government?

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What can be done to prevent the proliferation of errors in academic publications?

What can be done to prevent the proliferation of errors in academic publications? | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Every now and again a paper is published on the number of errors made in academic articles.  These papers document the frequency of conceptual errors, factual errors, errors in abstracts, errors in quotations, and errors in reference lists. James Hartley reports that the data are alarming, but suggests a possible way of reducing them. Perhaps in future there might be a single computer program that matches references in the text with correct (pre-stored) references as one writes the text.


Via Jorge Louçã
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On the Complexity and Behaviour of Cryptocurrencies Compared to Other Markets

We show that the behaviour of Bitcoin has interesting similarities to stock and precious metal markets, such as gold and silver. We report that whilst Litecoin, the second largest cryptocurrency, closely follows Bitcoin's behaviour, it does not show all the reported properties of Bitcoin. Agreements between apparently disparate complexity measures have been found, and it is shown that statistical, information-theoretic, algorithmic and fractal measures have different but interesting capabilities of clustering families of markets by type. The report is particularly interesting because of the range and novel use of some measures of complexity to characterize price behaviour, because of the IRS designation of Bitcoin as an investment property and not a currency, and the announcement of the Canadian government's own electronic currency MintChip.

Via Ashish Umre, Complejidady Economía
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When data gets creepy: the secrets we don’t realise we’re giving away

When data gets creepy: the secrets we don’t realise we’re giving away | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

We all worry about digital spies stealing our data – but now even the things we thought we were happy to share are being used in ways we don’t like. Why aren’t we making more of a fuss?

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Inequality Hurts Economic Growth, for All of Us

Inequality Hurts Economic Growth, for All of Us | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

It’s official, at least according to the OECD.
Rising inequality is estimated to have knocked more than 10 percentage points off growth in Mexico, New Zealand, Sweden, Finland and Norway over the past two decades. In Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States, the cumulative growth rate would have been six to nine percentage points higher had income disparities not widened. On the other hand, greater equality helped increase GDP per capita in Spain, France and Ireland prior to the crisis.

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H2020: finding calls that fit your ideas

H2020: finding calls that fit your ideas | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

All Horizon 2020 calls for proposals are published on the  Horizon 2020 Participant Portal, a one-stop-shop website that is available since January 2014. The Participant Portal provides all information needed for responding to a call: its opening and closing dates, its overall budget, the relevant Work Programme and all other documents related to the call. Calls can be searched and filtered using various parameters, such as open, closed or forthcoming calls as well as keywords. Another way to learn about open or forthcoming calls is to consult the Work Programme of a specific domain.

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Making the most out of big data

Since Social Media sites such as “Facebook” burst onto the scene 10 years ago, researchers and market analysts have been looking for a way to tap into the content on these sites. In recent years, there have been several attempts to do this with some being more successful than others (Lewis, Zamith & Hermida, 2013), particularly with regards to the scale of the medium in question. For those uninitiated (apologies to those that are) the term “Big Data” is the catch-all for the enormous trails of information generated by consumers going about their day in an increasingly digitized world (Manyika et al., 2011). It is this sheer volume of information that poses the first hurdle to be overcome when conducting research online. For example, earlier this year I was collecting data on the European Parliamentary Election and generated over 16,000 tweets in about three weeks. Bearing in mind that on average a tweet contains approximately 12 words in 1.5 sentences (Twitter, 2013), for those three weeks I had 196,500 words or 24,500 sentences to come to terms with. That is a lot of data for one person to deal with alone, especially if only applying manual techniques such as content analysis.  

So ultimately you have to ask two questions (...)

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Dynamics of Multi-Level Systems (DYMULT15)

Dynamics of Multi-Level Systems
Seminar/School — 01 - 12 June 2015
Workshop — 15 - 19 June 2015

Scientific Coordinators:
Fatihcan Atay (Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften, Leipzig, Germany)
Kristian Lindgren (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden)
Eckehard Olbrich (Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften, Leipzig, Germany)

 

http://www.pks.mpg.de/~dymult15/


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World Changing Ideas 2014

World Changing Ideas 2014 | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Predicting which scientific discoveries will change the world is, arguably, a fool's game. Who knows what the future will bring? Yet every year a handful of developments—say, the arrival of the quickest, cheapest genome-editing tool yet—get us so excited that we cannot help ourselves. This year those breakthroughs include tools for reprogramming living cells and rendering lab animals transparent; ways of powering electronics with sound waves and saliva; smartphone screens that correct for the flaws in your vision; Lego-like atomic structures that could produce major advances in superconductivity research; and others. Read about them now, then pay attention in the coming years to see what they do.


Via Jorge Louçã
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Economic complexity: A different way to look at the economy

Economic complexity: A different way to look at the economy - Foundations & Frontiers - Medium

By W. Brian Arthur; External Professor, Santa Fe Institute; Visiting Researcher, Palo Alto Research Center. 

Economics is a stately subject, one that has altered little since its modern foundations were laid in Victorian times. Now it is changing radically. Standard economics is suddenly being challenged by a number of new approaches: behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, new institutional economics. One of the new approaches came to life at the Santa Fe Institute: complexity economics.

Complexity economics got its start in 1987 when a now-famous conference of scientists and economists convened by physicist Philip Anderson and economist Kenneth Arrow met to discuss the economy as an evolving complex system. That conference gave birth a year later to the Institute’s first research program – the Economy as an Evolving Complex System – and I was asked to lead this. That program in turn has gone on to lay down a new and different way to look at the economy.


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Fàtima Galan's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:43 AM

"Where does complexity economics find itself now? Certainly, many commentators see it as steadily moving toward the center of economics. And there’s a recognition that it is more than a new set of methods or theories: it is a different way to see the economy. It views the economy not as machine-like, perfectly rational, and essentially static, but as organic, always exploring, and always evolving – always constructing itself."

Jason Leong's curator insight, January 2, 2015 11:34 PM

"Where does complexity economics find itself now? Certainly, many commentators see it as steadily moving toward the center of economics. And there’s a recognition that it is more than a new set of methods or theories: it is a different way to see the economy. It views the economy not as machine-like, perfectly rational, and essentially static, but as organic, always exploring, and always evolving – always constructing itself."

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Why social science should stop using the qualitative/quantitative dichotomy

Why social science should stop using the qualitative/quantitative dichotomy | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Qualitative and quantitative research methods have long been asserted as distinctly separate, but to what end? Howard Aldrich argues the simple dichotomy fails to account for the breadth of collection and analysis techniques currently in use. But institutional norms and practices keep alive the implicit message that non-statistical approaches are somehow less rigorous than statistical ones.

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Big Data and the attention economy

You want to reveal the hidden power of your Big Data, but the volumes are so large that people can’t find what they need, when they need it. 

Join Bernardo Huberman, HP Senior Fellow, as he describes HP Labs’ research into novel algorithms and easy-to-use interfaces designed to mitigate the attention deficit Big Data can create.

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How to escape the debt trap

How to escape the debt trap | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The only way to stimulate growth without generating more debt is to run increased fiscal deficits financed by central-bank money, writes Adair Turner.
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The retail market as a complex system

Aim of this paper is to introduce the complex system perspective into retail market analysis. Currently, to understand the retail market means to search for local patterns at the micro level, involving the segmentation, separation and profiling of diverse groups of consumers. In other contexts, however, markets are modelled as complex systems. Such strategy is able to uncover emerging regularities and patterns that make markets more predictable, e.g. enabling to predict how much a country’s GDP will grow. Rather than isolate actors in homogeneous groups, this strategy requires to consider the system as a whole, as the emerging pattern can be detected only as a result of the interaction between its self-organizing parts. This assumption holds also in the retail market: each customer can be seen as an independent unit maximizing its own utility function. As a consequence, the global behaviour of the retail market naturally emerges, enabling a novel description of its properties, complementary to the local pattern approach. Such task demands for a data-driven empirical framework. In this paper, we analyse a unique transaction database, recording the micro-purchases of a million customers observed for several years in the stores of a national supermarket chain. We show the emergence of the fundamental pattern of this complex system, connecting the products’ volumes of sales with the customers’ volumes of purchases. This pattern has a number of applications. We provide three of them. By enabling us to evaluate the sophistication of needs that a customer has and a product satisfies, this pattern has been applied to the task of uncovering the hierarchy of needs of the customers, providing a hint about what is the next product a customer could be interested in buying and predicting in which shop she is likely to go to buy it.

 

The retail market as a complex system
Pennacchioli D, Coscia M, Rinzivillo S, Giannotti F, Pedreschi D
EPJ Data Science 2014, 3 :33 (11 December 2014)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjds/s13688-014-0033-x ;


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Eli Levine's curator insight, December 13, 2014 10:43 PM

With this knowledge and insight into the world that's dawning.  One world must be destroyed in order for the new world to come forth; one segment of society must give way to the new in order to facilitate and ease this transition.

 

The top of society is where and what determines the ease or the possibility of this transition.  That is the point that needs to be altered in order to bring about this new dawn.  

 

Unfortunately, it is the point in society that is least willing, although most capable of change.  They'll cling to illusions and delusions of relative power over people and unsustainable material wealth than allow for everyone, including themselves, to realize something that could truly be wonderful for our lives, our well-being, and our health as living organisms.  This is before we talk about the bottom-up resistance that will be experienced as well, especially if the transition is done badly by the people who are at the top of the given social unit.  A shame that something so relatively simple can be so completely complicated and complex to carry out.

 

Silly world.

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Universal Power Law Governing Pedestrian Interactions

Universal Power Law Governing Pedestrian Interactions | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Human crowds often bear a striking resemblance to interacting particle systems, and this has prompted many researchers to describe pedestrian dynamics in terms of interaction forces and potential energies. The correct quantitative form of this interaction, however, has remained an open question. Here, we introduce a novel statistical-mechanical approach to directly measure the interaction energy between pedestrians. This analysis, when applied to a large collection of human motion data, reveals a simple power law interaction that is based not on the physical separation between pedestrians but on their projected time to a potential future collision, and is therefore fundamentally anticipatory in nature. Remarkably, this simple law is able to describe human interactions across a wide variety of situations, speeds and densities. We further show, through simulations, that the interaction law we identify is sufficient to reproduce many known crowd phenomena.

 

 

Universal Power Law Governing Pedestrian Interactions
Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 238701 – Published 2 December 2014
Ioannis Karamouzas, Brian Skinner, and Stephen J. Guy

http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.238701


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Liz Rykert's curator insight, December 13, 2014 9:19 PM

Love this kind of research describing the actual patterns of interaction, in this case the space between pedestrians described as the time to potential collision!

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Technological developments around the Internet of Things require more sustained engagement with public values.

Technological developments around the Internet of Things require more sustained engagement with public values. | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

How do we ensure that the ‘next big thing’ – the Internet of Things – be harnessed for the public good? Sonia Bussu of Involve argues that the involvement of the public is key to ensure that a common language is developed, and that societal values at put at the centre of technological developments.

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Inequality and the 1%

Inequality and the 1% | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Leading social geographer Danny Dorling unpacks the latest research into how the lives and ideas of the 1 percent impact the remaining 99%.
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In Latin America, Growth Trumps Climate

In countries like Brazil, where the economy has been slowing, government policy is prioritizing growth over plans to cut carbon emissions.
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Pattern formation in multiplex networks

The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation.


by Nikos E. Kouvaris, Shigefumi Hata, Albert Díaz-Guilera

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Parable of the Polygons - how harmless choices can make a harmful world

This is a story of how harmless choices can make a harmful world.

 

These little cuties are 50% Triangles, 50% Squares, and 100% slightly shapist. But only slightly! In fact, every polygon prefers being in a diverse crowd. (...)


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While we gain from digital connectivity, the accompanying invasion into our private lives makes our personal data ripe for abuse

While we gain from digital connectivity, the accompanying invasion into our private lives makes our personal data ripe for abuse | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

We use these apps and websites because of their benefits. We discover new music, restaurants and movies; we meet new friends and reconnect with old ones; we trade goods and services. The paradox of this situation is that while we gain from digital connectivity, the accompanying invasion into our private lives makes our personal data ripe for abuse — revealing things we thought we had not even disclosed.

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The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

How to sculpt an environment that optimizes creative flow and summons relevant knowledge from your long-term memory through the right retrieval cues.

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Social Choice and Social Welfare

Social Choice and Social Welfare | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Human beings have always lived in groups, and their individual lives have invariably depended on group decisions. But, given the daunting challenges of group choice, owing to the divergent interests and concerns of the group’s members, how should collective decision-making be carried out?
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A planet of suburbs

A planet of suburbs | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

THIRTY kilometres south of central Chennai, just out of earshot of the honking, hand-painted lorries roaring up Old Mahabalipuram Road, you seem to have reached rural India. The earth road buckles and heaves. Farmers dressed in Madras-checked dhotis rest outside huts roofed with palm leaves. Goats wander about. Then you turn a corner, go through a gate, and arrive in California.
Lakewood Enclave is a new development of 28 large two-storey houses, wedged tightly together. The houses are advertised as “Balinese-style”, although in truth they are hard to tell apart from any number of suburban homes around the world. Outside, the houses are painted a pale pinkish-brown; inside, the walls are white, the floors are stone and the design is open-plan. They each have three bedrooms (middle-class Tamil families are small these days) and a covered driveway to protect a car from the melting sun. Just one detail makes them distinctively Indian: a cupboard near the door for Hindu gods. (...)

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A Unifying Framework for Measuring Weighted Rich Clubs

A Unifying Framework for Measuring Weighted Rich Clubs | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Network analysis can help uncover meaningful regularities in the organization of complex systems. Among these, rich clubs are a functionally important property of a variety of social, technological and biological networks. Rich clubs emerge when nodes that are somehow prominent or ‘rich’ (e.g., highly connected) interact preferentially with one another. The identification of rich clubs is non-trivial, especially in weighted networks, and to this end multiple distinct metrics have been proposed. Here we describe a unifying framework for detecting rich clubs which intuitively generalizes various metrics into a single integrated method. This generalization rests upon the explicit incorporation of randomized control networks into the measurement process. We apply this framework to real-life examples, and show that, depending on the selection of randomized controls, different kinds of rich-club structures can be detected, such as topological and weighted rich clubs.
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