Non-Equilibrium Social Science
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Non-Equilibrium Social Science
This is the Scoop.it! for NESS - Non-Equilibrium Social Sciences. For more about the NESS community please go to our website http://www.nessnet.eu
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Urban Emergencies : Emergent Urbanism

Urban Emergencies : Emergent Urbanism | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Urban Emergencies : Emergent Urbanism (UE:EU) is an independent research group exploring international and interdisciplinary perspectives on the implications of emergent risks on the built environment and its inhabitants.


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New Insights on How To Verify Social Media

New Insights on How To Verify Social Media | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The "field" of information forensics has seen some interesting developments in recent weeks. Take the Verification Handbook or Twitter Lie-Detector project, for example. The Social Sensor project i...
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Thinking City

Thinking City | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Inspired by Don’s active involvement as a tutor in the successful Zurich Summer School ‘From Suburb To City’, we – Don Murphy and Zef Hemel – have the ambition to initiate an equally interesting event about city planning and city making, in and about Amsterdam. By organizing an event with an international audience, we wish to promote the Dutch position in the field of architecture, planning and innovative city making in a global scene. The Netherlands has always had a strong tradition in these fields, which is widely acknowledged internationally. Besides, we wish to initiate a dialogue about the current state of planning and future planning tasks in the city of Amsterdam. With an extensive public program that will be organized in relation to the Summer School studios, we wish to not only invite the Summer School participants, but also a wide local audience to engage in the thinking about the future of the city.

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Fractal Geometry

Fractal Geometry | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

This is a collection of pages meant to support a first course in fractal geometry for students without especially strong mathematical preparation, or any particular interest in science.
Each of the topics contains examples of fractals in the arts, humanities, or social sciences; these and other examples are collected in the panorama.
Fractal geometry is a new way of looking at the world; we have been surrounded by natural patterns, unsuspected but easily recognized after only an hour's training.


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German revival exposes deep fissure within Europe’s economies | Paul Ormerod

German revival exposes deep fissure within Europe’s economies | Paul Ormerod | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

In the 1990s and early 2000s, Germany was seen by many as the new ‘Sick Man of Europe’. Between 1991 and 2005, GDP growth averaged only 1.2 per cent a year, compared to 3.3 per cent in the UK. Since then, the German economy has revived dramatically. The recovery in the German cluster of economies from the financial crisis has been as strong as in the United States, with the previous peak level of output being regained in 2011. Germany itself experienced virtually no increase in unemployment in 2008 and 2009, its exports are at record levels, and even the crisis in the Euro area has not prevented expansion in both output and employment.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 22, 2014 1:57 PM

See.

 

An economy where profits are shared out leads to improved productivity, along with a negligence of "free trade" for the sake of free trade if it comes at the country's expense economically vis a vis jobs.  Combine that with an outstanding educational system that prepares people to a) be people and b) be productive and creative workers in the new economy, and you'll improve the value of your economy and your society, not through an uber-bearing system and logic of government, but through a collaborative and proactive government that protects the public's interests over those of the private elite who simply want to suck the wealth out of our society in this culture and society.

 

Unless we get the private businesses under the auspices of public security, the United States will continue to have mediocre job growth and productivity.  This will, in turn, effect our national security by making us more economically dependent upon the system than self-reliant in our own rights.

 

Can't believe we work things otherwise in this country!  So anti-social.

 

Think about it.

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How the Humanities changed the world

How the Humanities changed the world | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
By Rens Bod

Have insights from the humanities ever led to breakthroughs, or is any interpretation of a text, painting, musical piece, or historical event as good as any other? I have long been fascinated with this question. To be sure, insights from the humanities have had an impact on society.

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After 400 Years, Mathematicians Find A New Class Of Shapes

After 400 Years, Mathematicians Find A New Class Of Shapes | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The work of the Greek polymath Plato has kept millions of people busy for millennia. A few among them have been mathematicians who have obsessed about Platonic solids, a class of geometric forms that are highly regular and are commonly found in nature.

Since Plato’s work, two other classes of equilateral convex polyhedra, as the collective of these shapes are called, have been found:...
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Review of Net Smart: How to Thrive Online

Review of Net Smart: How to Thrive Online | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Rheingold, H. (2012). Net smart: How to thrive online. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Critics of modern social media and our emerging hyperlinked culture are abundant. So are cheerleaders and utopia...
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Study uncovers six basic types of Twitter conversations

Study uncovers six basic types of Twitter conversations | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Researchers say there are six structures for most conversations on Twitter, ranging from polarized debates to community clusters.
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 23, 2014 1:05 PM

This is just plain interesting.

 

How often we talk, and how little we actually have to say.

 

Think about it.

António F Fonseca's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 PM

I've already study this.

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Opinion Formation in the Digital Divide

Opinion Formation in the Digital Divide | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
NESS's insight:

The Internet is a public environment where people increasingly share information and exchange opinions. Not everyone can afford the costs of using the Internet, causing online opinions to be distorted in favor of certain social groups. This study examines the effect of the digital divide on opinion formation using the agent-based modeling (ABM) method. It extends the bounded confidence model to incorporate an online context and introduces accessibility and connectivity as new parameters. The simulation results indicate that connected agents are quicker to converge on a certain opinion than disconnected agents. Connected agents form an opinion cluster while disconnected agents are scattered over a broad range of opinions. The results also show that social harmony is harder to achieve as an individual's ability to communicate their own opinion improves. Both connected and disconnected agents are more likely to become a minority with higher accessibility. Disconnected agents are 11 to 14 times more likely to become a minority than connected agents, which suggests that the digital divide may be associated with discrimination. This study provides additional insights for academia as well as practitioners on opinion formation in the digital divide. Research limitations are addressed along with suggested future research directions.

by Dongwon Lim, Hwansoo Lee, Hangjung Zo and Andrew Ciganek (2014)

Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 17 (1) 13

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 20, 2014 12:12 PM

Indeed, you see the same phenomenon with the success or failure of resistance or insurgent movements.  Interconnectivity seems to give things more power and influence to act while disconnectivity weakens it (of course, in human relations, legitimacy, authority, universal/culturally specific appropriateness and connectivity condition are important as well). 


Part of what makes a group like al-Qaeda successful, for example, is its interconnectivity and apparently broad appeal to many people in the Islamic world.  Even if the actual fighters are a minority within the overall society, we can see that there can be significant tacit support from people living in the common society.  It is from this group that they're able to get intelligence, material support and even prospective personnel to join their cause.

 

It's the social and political war that's going to be an insurgency like al-Qaeda, not the military one.  You do this by getting the al-Qaeda groups alienated from their own people, such that their connectivity with the public is lessened (which means their material, personnel and moral capital is lessened) which then could, if you're actually doing things correctly, be able to bring people from that society over to your moral side in the conflict and, thus, turn those social connections hostile against the militants who continue to fight.  This takes a significant change in perspective, attitude and action vis a vis the whole of the Islamic world and all the issues that are relevant to their socieites.

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Is the Universe a Simulation?

Is the Universe a Simulation? | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
If so, that would help explain some mysterious things about math.

Via Jorge Louçã
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luiy's curator insight, February 17, 2014 7:29 AM


....... but there is one area of human endeavor that comes close to exemplifying the maxim “manuscripts don’t burn.” That area is mathematics. If Pythagoras had not lived, or if his work had been destroyed, someone else eventually would have discovered the same Pythagorean theorem. Moreover, this theorem means the same thing to everyone today as it meant 2,500 years ago, and will mean the same thing to everyone a thousand years from now — no matter what advances occur in technology or what new evidence emerges. Mathematical knowledge is unlike any other knowledge. Its truths are objective, necessary and timeless.

 

What kinds of things are mathematical entities and theorems, that they are knowable in this way? Do they exist somewhere, a set of immaterial objects in the enchanted gardens of the Platonic world, waiting to be discovered? Or are they mere creations of the human mind?

 

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Indeed, there may be. In a recent paper, “Constraints on the Universe as a Numerical Simulation,” the physicists Silas R. Beane, Zohreh Davoudi and Martin J. Savage outline a possible method for detecting that our world is actually a computer simulation. Physicists have been creating their own computer simulations of the forces of nature for years — on a tiny scale, the size of an atomic nucleus. They use a three-dimensional grid to model a little chunk of the universe; then they run the program to see what happens. This way, they have been able to simulate the motion and collisions of elementary particles.

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:31 PM

Bizarre, isn't it?

 

And, at the crux of it, is a mixture of how our brains interpret this reality and receive it, in addition to what's actually out there.

 

Perhaps we are a simulation of a universe, that is trying to understand and make sense of itself?

 

A vast computer program trying to uncover information about itself and other possibilities?

 

Think about it.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0eXvwmxPds

 

 

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The Bitcoin Economy [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Bitcoin Economy [INFOGRAPHIC] | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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The wolves of the web

The wolves of the web | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The barons of high-tech like to think of themselves as very different creatures from the barons of Wall Street. They create cool devices that let us carry the world in our pockets. They wear hoodies, not suits. And they owe their success to their native genius rather than to social connections—they are “the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in square holes”, in Steve Jobs’s famous formulation.

But for many people in San Francisco this is a distinction without a difference. For months now protesters have been blockading the fleets of private buses that Google and other technology giants use to ferry their employees to and from Silicon Valley 40 miles to the south. They are particularly incensed that the buses pay almost nothing to use public stops, often blocking city buses. Protesters are also angry that an influx of well-paid geeks has pushed up property prices and rents.

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Estonia: From Skype to scooters

Estonia: From Skype to scooters | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Estonia is where Skype originated and is a hi-tech haven for start-up companies. Could the tiny Baltic nation be one of the world's next Silicon Valleys?
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World Congress on Social Simulation 2014

World Congress on Social Simulation 2014 | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The 5th World Congress on Social Simulation

São Paolo, Brazil, November 4-7, 2014

http://www.wcss2014.pcs.usp.br

Computational Social Science (CSS) is a scientific discipline where computational methods and simulation models are employed to offer new insights into social phenomena beyond what is available with traditional social science methods. The WCSS is sponsored by the three regional scientific associations on social simulations: ESSA (the European Social Simulation Association), PAAA (Pacific Asian Association for Agent-based Approach in Social Systems Sciences) and CSSSA (Computational Social Science Society of the Americas). The goal of WCSS is to bring together researchers and practitioners from the social and computational sciences to share theoretical advances, practical applications, social media analyses, and novel methods in computational social science.

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ChASM 2014: Computational Approaches to Social Modeling

ChASM 2014:   Computational Approaches  to Social Modeling | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Modern life is infused with a myriad of gadgets and new technologies that are quickly becoming online extensions of our offline lives. How we interact with others, where we are and where we go are all facets that are increasingly captured with ever greater detail by our online tools and gadgets.The digital traces constantly produced by these tools create hitherto unseen possibilities for the study of human behavior, but also pose their own challenges. The avalanche of data we are witnessing demands new tools and concepts to be analyzed and the new problems that are within our reach demand new algorithms and models to be developed.
This workshop aims to bring together practitioners of both computer science and social science so that both may better understand the challenges faced by each other and how best they may collaborate to overcome them.

WebSci 2014, Bloomington, IN
June 24-26 2014.

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Writing about Math for the Perplexed and the Traumatized, by Steven Strogatz


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Applications to organize a satellite meeting at ECCS'14 are open

Applications to organize a satellite meeting at ECCS'14 are open | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Prospective organizers are invited to submit an informal proposal (less than 1000 words) by email to satellites@eccs14.eu with subject line 'Satellite proposal'. In the message header, please specify the satellite title, as well as the names and institutions of the members of the organizing committee.
The proposal should include detailed information regarding the subjects covered by the satellite meeting and their relevance to the conference main tracks, relation to previous such meetings, duration of the meeting (from 1/2 day to 2 days), a preliminary schedule
(including a list of invited speakers), paper selection standards, and a budget assessment*.
Also bear in mind that all the participants to a satellite meeting *must be* registered to the main conference.
The deadline for applications for satellite meetings has been now extended to *15 March 2014*.  Official notification of acceptance will be sent on *30 March 2014* at the latest.

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Carlo Ratti: why smart cities should focus our projects on people, rather then on technology

Carlo Ratti:  why smart cities should focus our projects on people, rather then on technology | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Carlo Ratti, Director of MIT's Senseable City Lab explains to us why smart cities should focus our projects on people, rather then on technology, and why we should think more about the society we want to create. He also gives some interesting insights on the Future Food District Pavillion he's curating for Milan Expo 2015. Food for thoughts!

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Laura Graziani's curator insight, June 8, 2015 6:53 AM

Intervista a CARLO RATTI, architetto e insegnante al MIT, a proposito di tecnologia e società. Ratti è curatore del padiglione Future Food District a Expo 2015

 

"The key mechanism behind ambient intelligence, then, is ‘sensing’ — the ability to measure what happens around us and to respond dynamically. New means of sensing are suffusing every aspect of urban space, revealing its visible and invisible dimensions: we are learning more about our cities so that they can learn about us."

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The Math That Predicted the Revolutions Sweeping the Globe Right Now

The Math That Predicted the Revolutions Sweeping the Globe Right Now | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The complex systems theorists who predicted the Arab Spring built a model that predicted the unrest in Ukraine, Venezuela, and Thailand too.
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 23, 2014 1:02 PM

I wonder if they're saying anything about the United States or Western Europe.

 

Something wicked this way comes.

 

And, when people are going to literally start to starve, it'll be very interesting to see what happens next.

 

Think about it.

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Understanding big data leads to insights, efficiencies, and saved lives

Understanding big data leads to insights, efficiencies, and saved lives | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

DATA NOW STREAM from daily life: from phones and credit cards and televisions and computers; from the infrastructure of cities; from sensor-equipped buildings, trains, buses, planes, bridges, and factories. The data flow so fast that the total accumulation of the past two years—a zettabyte—dwarfs the prior record of human civilization. “There is a big data revolution,” saysWeatherhead University Professor Gary King. But it is not the quantity of data that is revolutionary. “The big data revolution is that now we can do something with the data.

The revolution lies in improved statistical and computational methods, not in the exponential growth of storage or even computational capacity, King explains. The doubling of computing power every 18 months (Moore’s Law) “is nothing compared to a big algorithm”—a set of rules that can be used to solve a problem a thousand times faster than conventional computational methods could. One colleague, faced with a mountain of data, figured out that he would need a $2-million computer to analyze it. Instead, King and his graduate students came up with an algorithm within two hours that would do the same thing in 20 minutes—on a laptop: a simple example, but illustrative.

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Mixing local and global information for community detection in large networks

The problem of clustering large complex networks plays a key role in several scientific fields ranging from Biology to Sociology and Computer Science. Many approaches to clustering complex networks are based on the idea of maximizing a network modularity function. Some of these approaches can be classified as global because they exploit knowledge about the whole network topology to find clusters. Other approaches, instead, can be interpreted as local because they require only a partial knowledge of the network topology, e.g., the neighbors of a vertex. Global approaches are able to achieve high values of modularity but they do not scale well on large networks and, therefore, they cannot be applied to analyze on-line social networks like Facebook or YouTube. In contrast, local approaches are fast and scale up to large, real-life networks, at the cost of poorer results than those achieved by local methods. In this article we propose a glocal method to maximizing modularity, i.e., our method uses information at the global level, yet its scalability on large networks is comparable to that of local methods. The proposed method is called COmplex Network CLUster DEtection (or, shortly, CONCLUDE.) It works in two stages: in the first stage it uses an information-propagation model, based on random and non-backtracking walks of finite length, to compute the importance of each edge in keeping the network connected (called edge centrality.) Then, edge centrality is used to map network vertices onto points of an Euclidean space and to compute distances between all pairs of connected vertices. In the second stage, CONCLUDE uses the distances computed in the first stage to partition the network into clusters. CONCLUDE is computationally efficient since in the average case its cost is roughly linear in the number of edges of the network.

by Pasquale De Meo, Emilio Ferrara, Giacomo Fiumara, Alessandro Provetti

Journal of Computer and System Sciences 80(1):72-87, 2014
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcss.2013.03.012
Cite as: arXiv:1303.1738 [cs.SI]


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This algorithm can predict a revolution

This algorithm can predict a revolution | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
For students of international conflict, 2013 provided plenty to examine. There was civil war in Syria, ethnic violence in China, and riots to the point of revolution in Ukraine. For those working...

Via Artur Alves
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Artur Alves's curator insight, February 18, 2014 5:17 AM

"For students of international conflict, 2013 provided plenty to examine. There was civil war in Syria, ethnic violence in China, and riots to the point of revolution in Ukraine. For those working at Duke University’s Ward Lab, all specialists in predicting conflict, the year looks like a betting sheet, full of predictions that worked and others that didn’t pan out.

 

When the lab put out their semiannual predictions in July, they gave Paraguay a 97 percent chance of insurgency, largely based on reports of Marxist rebels. The next month, guerrilla campaigns intensified, proving out the prediction. In the case of China's armed clashes between Uighurs and Hans, the models showed a 33 percent chance of violence, even as the cause of each individual flare-up was concealed by the country's state-run media. On the other hand, the unrest in Ukraine didn't start raising alarms until the action had already started, so the country was left off the report entirely."

 

 

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 18, 2014 4:47 PM

I wonder if they're checking the United States at all with this supposed "existential threat" talk.  You'd think you'd be able to get the same kind of data by simply talking with people in the streets and getting the "temperature" of people's sentiments.

 

Still, I bet we can make it better than 80% if we combine the endeavors of investigative journalism with this computer algorithm.  Would be incredibly helpful for us to know, as well as to share with others.

 

Think about it.

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Alessandro Vespignani on theoretical developments for complex networks and systems

Alessandro Vespignani on theoretical developments for complex networks and systems | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
This interview with Alessandro Vespignani is about the future of modelling and forecasting of epidemics and is part of the Futurium Talking Futures interview...
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