Non-Equilibrium S...
Follow
17.6K views | +18 today
Non-Equilibrium Social Science
This is the Scoop.it! for NESS - Non-Equilibrium Social Sciences. For more about the NESS community please go to our website http://www.nessnet.eu
Curated by NESS
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by NESS from Papers
Scoop.it!

Twitter Trends Help Researchers Forecast Viral Memes

Twitter Trends Help Researchers Forecast Viral Memes | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

What makes a meme— an idea, a phrase, an image—go viral? For starters, the meme must have broad appeal, so it can spread not just within communities of like-minded individuals but can leap from one community to the next. Researchers, by mining public Twitter data, have found that a meme's “virality” is often evident from the start. After only a few dozen tweets, a typical viral meme (as defined by tweets using a given hashtag) will already have caught on in numerous communities of Twitter users. In contrast, a meme destined to peter out will resonate in fewer groups.

 


Via Claudia Mihai, Complexity Digest
more...
june holley's curator insight, January 23, 8:31 AM

Some important ideas here for people interested in change.

Premsankar Chakkingal's curator insight, January 30, 8:58 AM

Forecasting the Future Twitter Trends in hashtags

Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 4:48 AM

Twitter, what happens when things go viral?

Rescooped by NESS from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

From Animals to Animats: Simulation of Adaptive Behavior 2014

FROM ANIMALS TO ANIMATS 13

The 13th International Conference on the SIMULATION OF ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR (SAB2014)
22-26 July 2014, Castellon, Spain

http://www.sab2014.org/


The objective of this interdisciplinary conference is to bring together researchers in computer science, artificial intelligence, alife, control, robotics, neurosciences, ethology, evolutionary biology, and related fields so as to further our understanding of the behaviors and underlying mechanisms that allow natural and artificial animals to adapt and survive in uncertain environments. The conference will focus on experiments with well-defined models --- robot models, computer simulation models, mathematical models --- designed to help characterize and compare various organizational principles or architectures underlying adaptive behavior in real animals and in synthetic agents, the animats.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Threshold Model for Triggered Avalanches on Networks

Based on a theoretical model for opinion spreading on a network, through avalanches, the effect of external field is now considered, by using methods from non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. The original part contains the implementation that the avalanche is only triggered when a local variable (a so called awareness) reaches and goes above a threshold. The dynamical rules are constrained to be as simple as possible, in order to sort out the basic features, though more elaborated variants are proposed. Several results are obtained for a Erd\"os-R\'enyi network and interpreted through simple analytical laws, scale free or logistic map-like, i.e., (i) the sizes, durations, and number of avalanches, including the respective distributions, (ii) the number of times the external field is applied to one possible node before all nodes are found to be above the threshold, (iii) the number of nodes still below the threshold and the number of hot nodes (close to threshold) at each time step.


Via Bernard Ryefield
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Papers
Scoop.it!

Computer science: The learning machines

Three years ago, researchers at the secretive Google X lab in Mountain View, California, extracted some 10 million still images from YouTube videos and fed them into Google Brain — a network of 1,000 computers programmed to soak up the world much as a human toddler does. After three days looking for recurring patterns, Google Brain decided, all on its own, that there were certain repeating categories it could identify: human faces, human bodies and … cats.

Google Brain's discovery that the Internet is full of cat videos provoked a flurry of jokes from journalists. But it was also a landmark in the resurgence of deep learning: a three-decade-old technique in which massive amounts of data and processing power help computers to crack messy problems that humans solve almost intuitively, from recognizing faces to understanding language.


http://www.nature.com/news/computer-science-the-learning-machines-1.14481


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

ESRC Conference 2014 - Diversity in macroeconomics: new perspectives from agent-based computational, complexity and behavioural economics

ESRC Conference 2014 - Diversity in macroeconomics: new perspectives from agent-based computational, complexity and behavioural economics | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
24-25 February 2014The 2014 conference is co-hosted with the Economic and Social Research Council and organised by Sheri Markose from the Department of Economics. It will critically examine established thinking and bring together a range of new perspectives on identifying future directions for macroeconomics and policy.

Developments from at least three new branches of economics, agent-based computational, complexity and behavioural economics, arising from highly interdisciplinary studies of computational and digital technologies, complexity sciences and neuro-physiology of the brain, will be addressed.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Talks
Scoop.it!

Marco Annunziata: Welcome to the age of the industrial internet

Everyone's talking about the "Internet of Things," but what exactly does that mean for our future? In this thoughtful talk, economist Marco Annunziata looks at how technology is transforming the industrial sector, creating machines that can see, feel, sense and react -- so they can be operated far more efficiently. Think: airplane parts that send an alert when they need to be serviced, or wind turbines that communicate with one another to generate more electricity. It's a future with exciting implications for us all.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/marco_annunziata_welcome_to_the_age_of_the_industrial_internet.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

PLOS Text Mining Collection

PLOS Text Mining Collection | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Text Mining is an interdisciplinary field combining techniques from linguistics, computer science and statistics to build tools that can efficiently retrieve and extract information from digital text. Over the last few decades, there has been increasing interest in text mining research because of the potential commercial and academic benefits this technology might enable. However, as with the promises of many new technologies, the benefits of text mining are still not clear to most academic researchers.
This situation is now poised to change for several reasons. First, the rate of growth of the scientific literature has now outstripped the ability of individuals to keep pace with new publications, even in a restricted field of study. Second, text-mining tools have steadily increased in accuracy and sophistication to the point where they are now suitable for widespread application. Finally, the rapid increase in availability of digital text in an Open Access format now permits text-mining tools to be applied more freely than ever before.
To acknowledge these changes and the growing body of work in the area of text mining research, today PLOS launches the Text Mining Collection, a compendium of major reviews and recent highlights published in the PLOS family of journals on the topic of text mining.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Talks
Scoop.it!

Enrique Peñalosa: Why buses represent democracy in action

"An advanced city is not one where even the poor use cars, but rather one where even the rich use public transport," argues Enrique Peñalosa. In this spirited talk, the former mayor of Bogotá shares some of the tactics he used to change the transportation dynamic in the Colombian capital... and suggests ways to think about building smart cities of the future.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/enrique_penalosa_why_buses_represent_democracy_in_action.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Papers
Scoop.it!

Rebalancing the Global Economy

Rebalancing the Global Economy | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

This special report includes 23 articles on topics ranging from technology, innovation and brand building to infrastructure, entrepreneurship and social impact. Current trends and recent developments shaping today’s global marketplace are covered, as are specific companies, industries and countries.
http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/special-report/rebalancing-global-economy/


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Are Opinions Based on Science: Modelling Social Response to Scientific Facts

Are Opinions Based on Science: Modelling Social Response to Scientific Facts | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

As scientists we like to think that modern societies and their members base their views, opinions and behaviour on scientific facts. This is not necessarily the case, even though we are all (over-) exposed to information flow through various channels of media, i.e. newspapers, television, radio, internet, and web. It is thought that this is mainly due to the conflicting information on the mass media and to the individual attitude (formed by cultural, educational and environmental factors), that is, one external factor and another personal factor. In this paper we will investigate the dynamical development of opinion in a small population of agents by means of a computational model of opinion formation in a co-evolving network of socially linked agents. The personal and external factors are taken into account by assigning an individual attitude parameter to each agent, and by subjecting all to an external but homogeneous field to simulate the effect of the media. We then adjust the field strength in the model by using actual data on scientific perception surveys carried out in two different populations, which allow us to compare two different societies. We interpret the model findings with the aid of simple mean field calculations. Our results suggest that scientifically sound concepts are more difficult to acquire than concepts not validated by science, since opposing individuals organize themselves in close communities that prevent opinion consensus.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Correlations and Scaling Laws in Human Mobility

Correlations and Scaling Laws in Human Mobility | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

In this paper, we empirically analyze the real-world human movements which are based on GPS records, and observe rich scaling properties in the temporal-spatial patterns as well as an abnormal transition in the speed-displacement patterns together with an evidence to the real-world traffic jams. In addition, we notice that the displacements at the population level show a significant positive correlation, indicating a cascading-like nature in human movements. Furthermore, our analysis at the individual level finds that the displacement distributions of users with stronger correlations usually are closer to the power law, suggesting a correlation between the positive correlation of the displacement series and the form of an individual's displacement distribution.


Via Bernard Ryefield
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

4th Student Conference on Complexity Science

4th Student Conference on Complexity Science | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The Student Conference on Complexity Science (SCCS) is the largest UK conference for early-career researchers working under the interdisciplinary framework of Complex Systems, with a particular focus on computational modelling, simulation and network analysis. Since 2010, this conference series has brought together PhD students and early career researchers from both the UK and overseas, whose interests span areas as diverse as quantum physics, ecological food webs or the economics of happiness. This interdisciplinary nature of the conference is reflected by the diversity of keynote speakers as well as practical, hands-on workshops.


The 4th Student Conference on Complexity Science will be held 19-22 August 2014 at the University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

http://sccs2014.soton.ac.uk


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Francis Heylighen: Return to Eden? (...) on the Road to an Omnipotent Global Intelligence

The concept of Singularity envisages a technology-driven explosion in intelligence. I argue that the resulting suprahuman intelligence will not be centralized in a single AI system, but distributed across all people and artifacts, as connected via the Internet. This global brain will function to tackle all challenges confronting the "global superorganism". Its capabilities will extend so far beyond our present abilities that they may be best conveyed as a pragmatic version of the "divine" attributes: omniscience (knowing everything needed to solve our problems), omnipresence (being available anywhere anytime), omnipotence (being able to provide any product or service at negligible cost) and omnibenevolence (aiming at the greatest happiness for the greatest number). By extrapolating present trends, technologies and evolutionary mechanisms, I argue that these abilities are likely to be realized within the next few decades. The resulting solution to all our individual and societal problems can be seen as a return to "Eden", the idyllic state of abundance and peace that supposedly existed before civilization. In this utopian society, individuals would be supported and challenged by the global brain to maximally develop their abilities, and to continuously create new knowledge. However, side effects of technological innovation are likely to create serious disturbances on the road to this utopia. The most important dangers are cascading failures facilitated by hyperconnectivity, the spread of psychological parasites that make people lose touch with reality, the loss of human abilities caused by an unnatural, passive lifestyle, and a conservative backlash triggered by too rapid changes. Because of the non-linearity of the system, the precise impact of such disturbances cannot be predicted. However, a range of precautionary measures, including a "global immune system", may pre-empt the greatest risks.

 

Return to Eden?
Promises and Perils on the Road to an Omnipotent Global Intelligence
Prof. Dr. Francis Heylighen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWJA_i-cY30


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

The effect of today’s technology on tomorrow’s jobs will be immense—and no country is ready for it

The effect of today’s technology on tomorrow’s jobs will be immense—and no country is ready for it | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

INNOVATION, the elixir of progress, has always cost people their jobs. In the Industrial Revolution artisan weavers were swept aside by the mechanical loom. Over the past 30 years the digital revolution has displaced many of the mid-skill jobs that underpinned 20th-century middle-class life. Typists, ticket agents, bank tellers and many production-line jobs have been dispensed with, just as the weavers were.

For those, including this newspaper, who believe that technological progress has made the world a better place, such churn is a natural part of rising prosperity. Although innovation kills some jobs, it creates new and better ones, as a more productive society becomes richer and its wealthier inhabitants demand more goods and services. A hundred years ago one in three American workers was employed on a farm. Today less than 2% of them produce far more food. The millions freed from the land were not consigned to joblessness, but found better-paid work as the economy grew more sophisticated. Today the pool of secretaries has shrunk, but there are ever more computer programmers and web designers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Meet the Man Google Hired to Make AI a Reality

Meet the Man Google Hired to Make AI a Reality | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

(...) Where will this next generation of researchers take the deep learning movement? The big potential lies in deciphering the words we post to the web — the status updates and the tweets and instant messages and the comments — and there’s enough of that to keep companies like Facebook, Google, and Yahoo busy for an awfully long time. The aim to give these services the power to actually understand what their users are saying — without help from other humans. “We want to take AI and CIFAR to wonderful new places,” Hinton says, “where no person, no student, no program has gone before.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Étoile Platform
Scoop.it!

Complexity Studies in Economics, a new course on the éToile Platform

Complexity Studies in Economics, a new course on the éToile Platform | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

This course is anchored on the seven main sections associated with the key Economics areas where the complex systems studies approach to economy has been known to have important influence. These sections are: Section I: A Philosophical and Methodological approach to Economy using Complexity Sciences; Section II: The structure of interaction; Section III: Macroeconomics and Growth; Section IV: Financial Markets; Section V: International and Monetary Economy Dynamics; Section VI: Regional Economic Systems; Section VII: Evolutionary Economic Dynamics. Other than discussing the literature, the students will be invited to model, implement and discuss some of the underlying mentioned models using social simulation programming libraries.


Via Jorge Louçã
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Philosophy and Complexity
Scoop.it!

What Kind of Science is Computational Science? - Wired

What Kind of Science is Computational Science? - Wired | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
What Kind of Science is Computational Science?
Wired
For a computational model, we look at Δt in the limit that Δt gets small enough so that the output of the code agrees with real life.

Via John Symons
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Economia y sistemas complejos
Scoop.it!

Minsky's Creators Talk Economic Modeling, Bitcoin, and Chaos Theory

Minsky's Creators Talk Economic Modeling, Bitcoin, and Chaos Theory | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The software's designers talked with SourceForge about the challenges of simulating economic models, especially in turbulent times.


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complejidady Economía
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Talks
Scoop.it!

Jared Diamond: How societies can grow old better

There's an irony behind the latest efforts to extend human life: It's no picnic to be an old person in a youth-oriented society. Older people can become isolated, lacking meaningful work and low on funds. In this intriguing talk, Jared Diamond looks at how many different societies treat their elders -- some better, some worse -- and suggests we all take advantage of experience.

 

Jared Diamond: How societies can grow old better

http://www.ted.com/talks/jared_diamond_how_societies_can_grow_old_better.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from Papers
Scoop.it!

Persistence of social signatures in human communication

We combine cell phone data with survey responses to show that a person’s social signature, as we call the pattern of their interactions with different friends and family members, is remarkably robust. People focus a high proportion of their communication efforts on a small number of individuals, and this behavior persists even when there are changes in the identity of the individuals involved. Although social signatures vary between individuals, a given individual appears to retain a specific social signature over time. Our results are likely to reflect limitations in the ability of humans to maintain many emotionally close relationships, both because of limited time and because the emotional “capital” that individuals can allocate between family members and friends is finite.

 

Persistence of social signatures in human communication

Jari Saramäki, E. A. Leicht, Eduardo López, Sam G. B. Roberts, Felix Reed-Tsochas, and Robin I. M. Dunbar

PNAS

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1308540110


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NESS from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

ECCS'14 European Conference on Complex Systems

ECCS'14 European Conference on Complex Systems | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

ECCS’14 will be a major international conference and event in the area of complex systems and interdisciplinary science in general. It will offer unique opportunities to study novel scientific approaches in a multitude of application areas. Two days of the conference, 24 and 25 of September, are reserved for satellite meetings, which will cover a broad range of subjects on all aspects of Complex Systems, as reflected by the conference tracks.

 

ECCS'14 European Conference on Complex Systems

Lucca, Italy

2014-09-22:26

http://www.eccs14.eu


Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 16, 12:02 PM

The major conference in Complex Systems this year will be held in Lucca.

Rescooped by NESS from 'Next Economy and Wealth'
Scoop.it!

How to Frame the Sharing Economy Narrative (and Move On)

How to Frame the Sharing Economy Narrative (and Move On) | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Is the sharing economy the first attempt to instill community perspectives in the traditional process of venture capital backed innovation? Or, on the contrary, is that an attempt of Venture Capita...

Via Ferananda
more...
Ferananda's curator insight, January 14, 6:29 PM

Best article I have read about 'Sharing economies' in a long time. @meedabyte is honest and direct. The article is also full of powerful resources and moves from sharing economies into innovation and venture capital.  He also shares ideas for the implementation of true cooperative capitals and crowdfunding.  Very good read. Its long. So, if  you don't have a lot of time you might want to check my diigo annotated link for some good gems. https://diigo.com/01hsiq

Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Data, Data Everywhere...

Data, Data Everywhere... | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

From the Tesco Clubcard to the Large Hadron Collider, from internet searches to genetic science, from social networks to government services - these days they all generate data, huge quantities of it.

The greatest intellectual challenge faced by many organisations today is how not to be overwhelmed by data, and instead how to select and analyse the data that matters.

Future intellectual history may well regard the period we're in now as the 'data decade'. Timandra Harkness explores the challenges and the opportunities through talking to those in a variety of fields who are seeking to tackle them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by NESS
Scoop.it!

Let's Bring The Polymath — and the Dabblers — Back

Let's Bring The Polymath — and the Dabblers — Back | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

It’s as if the Scientific Revolution — and the knowledge it spawned — killed the ability to Know Everything. Before then, it was not only possible to be a generalist or polymath (someone with a wide range of expertise) — but the weaving together of different disciplines was actually rather unexceptional. The Ancients discussed topics such as ethics, biology, and metaphysics alongside each other. The Babylonian Talmud discusses everything from astronomy and biology to morality and law, weaving them together into a single compendium.

So what changed?

more...
No comment yet.