Non-Equilibrium Social Science
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Non-Equilibrium Social Science
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Chartbook of Economic Inequality – The long-run Perspective on Economic Inequality

This Chartbook presents the empirical evidence about long-run changes in economic inequality. The chartbook covers 25 countries – often over the course of more than one hundred years. For each country a chart shows how different dimensions of economic inequality have changed over time. A detailed description of the data sources is given for each country.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 12, 2014 4:07 PM

Interesting that poverty fell overall during the middle of the 20th century, even though wages weren't tracking with profits, while only the rich have gotten richer since the 1970's and 80's. 

 

These are the facts.

 

Call them Communistic, call them Socialistic; they're still facts, regardless of what you do or think or feel.

 

The economy is progressive territory.  The society is progressive territory.  The international sphere is progressive territory.

 

And the conservatives?  They have nothing but their own hallucinations and opinions.  They don't match the real world or reflect how things actually work.

I charge that they are not functionally capable of leading, and t think, they're not even really capable of coping with the conditions that exist in this world and are so antithetical to their outlook, hopes and wishes.

 

Conservatives haven't a leg to stand on in the policy argument for the sake of society, other than their nonsensical babblings that justify their own greed.  They ought to have the spittle wiped off their chins and put into mental health wards where they belong.  Judging from their behavior, they are crazy and/or ignorant.  If they're not crazy and/or ignorant, then their malevolent, which is just as good as being deemed "crazy" in my book, chiefly because malevolence only yields net negativities for everyone, including the malevolent one.

 

It's time that society started treating conservatism and general political extremism as mental health problems, not as opinions equal in the light of common reality. 


They're not equal.  And, while the people who espouse these views are equal under the law (which allows people who are dangers to themselves and others to be committed against their wills), the fact of the matter is they're not equal in light of common reality and common humanity.  They ought to be treated and enabled to lead the fullest of lives possible, without causing harm onto everyone else in society through government, politics and policy making.

 

Think about it.

 

Because I'm sick of the back and forth between conservatives and the rest of the citizenry.  It's time that we get these people settled and safely esconced where they belong, for their own sakes and benefits, as well as for all of our sakes and benefits.

 

Otherwise, we'll die under their influence.

 

And, quite frankly, I don't want to die yet or so soon.

 

Do you?

Think about it.

 

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Joseph E. Stiglitz argues that the impact of technological change on living standards has become increasingly unclear

Joseph E. Stiglitz argues that the impact of technological change on living standards has become increasingly unclear | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Around the world, there is enormous enthusiasm for the type of technological innovation symbolized by Silicon Valley, with many attempting to replicate the ingenuity that they regard as America’s true comparative advantage. But there is a puzzle: it is difficult to detect the benefits of this innovation in GDP statistics.

Via Willy De Backer
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rafaeldiazarias's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:32 AM

A menudo se ignoran los costes sociales de las innovaciones, tanto en términos económicos como de progreso social

Artur Alves's curator insight, March 11, 2014 5:38 AM

"Still, one cannot avoid the uneasy feeling that, when all is said and done, the contribution of recent technological innovations to long-term growth in living standards may be substantially less than the enthusiasts claim. A lot of intellectual effort has been devoted to devising better ways of maximizing advertising and marketing budgets – targeting customers, especially the affluent, who might actually buy the product. But standards of living might have been raised even more if all of this innovative talent had been allocated to more fundamental research – or even to more applied research that could have led to new products."

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 11, 2014 9:34 AM

The valueless economy at work.  At least, the way that we measure it is valueless.

What good is monetary gain if it does not produce a better quality of life for everyone?

How does it help the elite if they destroy everything for the sake of personal monetary "gain"? 

 

Why do we sacrifice so much of our actual well being for the sake of GDP "growth" (if that "growth" manifests itself in the first place

 

Think about it.

 

Because, apparently, some very important people, are not.

 

Think about it.

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How PowerPoint Is Ruining Higher Ed, Explained in One PowerPoint

How PowerPoint Is Ruining Higher Ed, Explained in One PowerPoint | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Via Jorge Louçã
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Origin of Peer Influence in Social Networks

Social networks pervade our everyday lives: we interact, influence, and are influenced by our friends and acquaintances. With the advent of the World Wide Web, large amounts of data on social networks have become available, allowing the quantitative analysis of the distribution of information on them, including behavioral traits and fads. Recent studies of correlations among members of a social network, who exhibit the same trait, have shown that individuals influence not only their direct contacts but also friends’ friends, up to a network distance extending beyond their closest peers. Here, we show how such patterns of correlations between peers emerge in networked populations. We use standard models (yet reflecting intrinsically different mechanisms) of information spreading to argue that empirically observed patterns of correlation among peers emerge naturally from a wide range of dynamics, being essentially independent of the type of information, on how it spreads, and even on the class of underlying network that interconnects individuals. Finally, we show that the sparser and clustered the network, the more far reaching the influence of each individual will be.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098702

Origin of Peer Influence in Social Networks
Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098702 – Published 6 March 2014
Flávio L. Pinheiro, Marta D. Santos, Francisco C. Santos, and Jorge M. Pacheco


Via Complexity Digest, Shaolin Tan
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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 10, 2014 5:16 PM

Indeed, we are all interconnected in very profound and subtle ways, whether we accept it or not.


This one's for the Libertarians and conservatives out there, who don't seem to think that their actions effect the other, or that the other can effect them, or that the actions done onto the other will effect the actions that are done onto them by the other.

 

Kind of like how they blame the poor for being angry at the rich, after the poor produced the wealth that engorges the rich.

 

Silly people....

 

Think about it.

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Mining Concurrent Topical Activity in Microblog Streams

Streams of user-generated content in social media exhibit patterns of collective attention across diverse topics, with temporal structures determined both by exogenous factors and endogenous factors. Teasing apart different topics and resolving their individual, concurrent, activity timelines is a key challenge in extracting knowledge from microblog streams. Facing this challenge requires the use of methods that expose latent signals by using term correlations across posts and over time. Here we focus on content posted to Twitter during the London 2012 Olympics, for which a detailed schedule of events is independently available and can be used for reference. We mine the temporal structure of topical activity by using two methods based on non-negative matrix factorization. We show that for events in the Olympics schedule that can be semantically matched to Twitter topics, the extracted Twitter activity timeline closely matches the known timeline from the schedule. Our results show that, given appropriate techniques to detect latent signals, Twitter can be used as a social sensor to extract topical-temporal information on real-world events at high temporal resolution.

by A. Panisson, L. Gauvin, M. Quaggiotto, C. Cattuto

in Proceedings of the 4th workshop on 'Making Sense of Microposts', World Wide Web Conference 2014

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Drowning in Light - technology has fed our addiction to light, and might help us end it

Drowning in Light - technology has fed our addiction to light, and might help us end it | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

In 1996, Yale economist William D. Nordhaus calculated that the average citizen of Babylon would have had to work a total of 41 hours to buy enough lamp oil to equal a 75-watt light bulb burning for one hour. At the time of the American Revolution, a colonial would have been able to purchase the same amount of light, in the form of candles, for about five hour’s worth of work. And by 1992, the average American, using compact fluorescents, could earn the same amount of light in less than one second. That sounds like a great deal.

 

Except for one thing: We treat light like a drug whose price is spiraling toward zero.

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Survey of schools: ICT in Education

This study collected and benchmarked information from 31 European countries (27 EU Member States, Croatia, Iceland, Norway and Turkey) on the access, use, competence and attitudes of students and teachers regarding ICT in schools.


Via Jorge Louçã
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Obama Wants New $5 Billion For Science, But Will It Happen?

Obama Wants New $5 Billion For Science, But Will It Happen? | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Today’s budget request to Congress appears to contain some very good news for scientists: A proposed $5 billion in new money for an array of research-related programs, including hundreds of new grants for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a new biosafety research laboratory, and a new high-risk, high-reward funding program for biomedical science modeled on the military’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). But don’t get your hopes up.

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Podcast : Future role of users in ICT-related innovation

Podcast : Future role of users in ICT-related innovation | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

In this interview, Valerie Frissen summarizes the future challenges and developments in the role of users in ICT-related innovation. In particular, she highlights the need to keep trust and transparency in the Internet, so as to maintain interactions between society and technology.

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Urban #Observatory Compare Cities

Urban #Observatory Compare Cities | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The focus of the Urban Observatory is on the people who live in cities, the work they do there, the movement made possible through transportation networks, the public facilities needed to run the city, and the natural systems which are impacted by the city's footprint. If you are a city with mappable data in any of these categories, we urge you to contribute maps to the project.


Via bart rosseau, luiy, @backbook
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bart rosseau's curator insight, July 15, 2013 4:14 AM

great concept, great layout and design. Curious to see if this will last!

luiy's comment, March 1, 2014 11:36 AM
I can see the interesting application in the are of #eDemocracy
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What Fuels the Most Influential Tweets?

What Fuels the Most Influential Tweets? | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The number of followers you have and the exact wording matter less than you think. What makes a difference is having the right message for the right people.

Via luiy
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luiy's curator insight, February 22, 2014 7:58 AM

"Influence" doesn't necessarily mean what you think it does. In the age of the social-media celebrity, a glut of Twitter followers or particularly pugnacious sampling of pithy updates are often the hallmarks of an influencer. But new research suggests that influence is situational at best: as people compete for the attention of the broader online ecosystem, the relevance of your message to the existing conversation of those around you trumps any innate "power" a person may have.

 

.... According to co-author Vespignani, having millions of followers does not denote an important message. Rather, the messages with the most immediate relevance tend to have a higher probability of resonating within a certain network than others. Think of it as "survival of the fittest" for information: those tweets that capture the most attention, whether related to a major geopolitical or news event or a particular interest, are likely to persist longer. This competition sounds bad, but it's generally good for messages in general: thousands of tweets about Japan's 2011 earthquake or the ongoing conflict in Syria don't cancel each other out, but help refocus the attention of the wider Twitter audience on those issues, which in turn provides an added lift to individual messages over other off-topic ones.

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Asimov’s Predictions from 1964: A Brief Report Card

Asimov’s Predictions from 1964: A Brief Report Card | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Predictions about technology's future are almost always doomed. According to 2001: A Space Odyssey, for example, humans should be making flights to the outer reaches of our solar system. Per 1984, by now we should have become a society of brainwashed drones, toiling under constant surveillance for faceless overlords. Clearly, that would never—hey, wait a second!

Nevertheless, Isaac Asimov, the revered science-fiction author, made a stab at describing our lives today—back in 1964. In a New York Times article 50 years ago, Asimov called his vision “Visit to the World's Fair of 2014.” Now it is, in fact, 2014. Shall we dust off his little time capsule and see how well his predictions fared?

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Autonomous drones flock like birds

Autonomous drones flock like birds | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

A Hungarian team has created the first drones that can fly as a coordinated flock. The researchers watched as the ten autonomous robots took to the air in a field outside Budapest, zipping through the open sky, flying in formation or even following a leader, all without any central control.

 

Autonomous drones flock like birds
Ed Yong

Nature doi:10.1038/nature.2014.14776

http://www.nature.com/news/autonomous-drones-flock-like-birds-1.14776


Via Complexity Digest
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Keith Hamon's curator insight, February 28, 2014 12:49 PM

I think flocking as an educational strategy deserves more study. Can a flock of birds find their way home better than a single bird? I'll bet they can, but how do they do it? How do they coordinate their knowledge and behavior?

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Netconomics: Novel Forecasting Techniques from the Combination of Big Data, Network Science and Economics

The combination of the network theoretic approach with recently available abundant economic data leads to the development of novel analytic and computational tools for modelling and forecasting key economic indicators. The main idea is to introduce a topological component into the analysis, taking into account consistently all higher-order interactions. We present three basic methodologies to demonstrate different approaches to harness the resulting network gain. First, a multiple linear regression optimisation algorithm is used to generate a relational network between individual components of national balance of payment accounts. This model describes annual statistics with a high accuracy and delivers good forecasts for the majority of indicators. Second, an early-warning mechanism for global financial crises is presented, which combines network measures with standard economic indicators. From the analysis of the cross-border portfolio investment network of long-term debt securities, the proliferation of a wide range of over-the-counter-traded financial derivative products, such as credit default swaps, can be described in terms of gross-market values and notional outstanding amounts, which are associated with increased levels of market interdependence and systemic risk. Third, considering the flow-network of goods traded between G-20 economies, network statistics provide better proxies for key economic measures than conventional indicators. For example, it is shown that a country's gate-keeping potential, as a measure for local power, projects its annual change of GDP generally far better than the volume of its imports or exports.

 

Netconomics: Novel Forecasting Techniques from the Combination of Big Data, Network Science and Economics
Andreas Joseph, Irena Vodenska, Eugene Stanley, Guanrong Chen

http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.0848


Via Complexity Digest, Complejidady Economía
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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 12, 2014 10:25 AM

In other words, the more interconnected, bound of and valuable a bank is, the more likely that its failure will result in a global financial crisis.  These banks probably should be broken up, such that there are more nodes and less valuable interconnectivity amongst the banks.

 

The second part, in plain English, basically stated that a country's relative interconnectivity as a node in international trade and the strength of that interconnected trade are greater predictions of economic success than of simple net import/export data.

 

It seems to me that many political leaders and policy makers are not up to date with these latest insights.  This is probably how it is that we're getting the same unevolved, unadapted and negatively effective policies that are driving this country, and the world, into the ground.  On top of that, it's still not addressing our chief problem of being addicted to something that we don't really use and shouldn't really want in excess quantities (money), especially when it's purchased with the opportunity to be well, healthy and survivable as an individual and collective species.

 

It's sad that such a species with such potential should go to waste at this moment over a little ignorance and a very powerful attachment to something that has no bearing on our well being and actual quality of life.

 

Think about it.

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The Languages of Twitter Users

The Languages of Twitter Users | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

To measure Twitter’s global impact, Gnip, a social data firm, studied the firehose of posts over the years. The above chart tracks tweets from users who selected a primary language in their profiles since the service went live in 2006. Last year, among people who told Twitter they had a preferred language, almost 49 percent of tweets were from users who chose Japanese, Spanish, Portuguese and other languages other than English.

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A Survey of Big Data Definitions

The term big data has become ubiquitous. Owing to a shared origin between academia, industry and the media there is no single unified definition, and various stakeholders provide diverse and often contradictory definitions. The lack of a consistent definition introduces ambiguity and hampers discourse relating to big data. This short paper attempts to collate the various definitions which have gained some degree of traction and to furnish a clear and concise definition of an otherwise ambiguous term.

By Jonathan Stuart Ward, Adam Barker


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NetSci'14 Symposia: Temporal Networks, Human Dynamics and Social Physics

NetSci'14 Symposia: Temporal Networks, Human Dynamics and Social Physics | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Temporal Networks, Human Dynamics and Social Physics
NetSci'14 Symposium, Berkeley California, June 2-6 2014 


A clear understanding of human interactions and more generally social dynamics has a wide range of applications, ranging from social sciences to information technology, and more fundamentally it is crucial for the design and modeling of social organizations, companies, and governments that are more efficient, responsive, and creative. In this context, however, little is known about the temporal properties of social dynamics and their effects on relevant diffusion processes such as epidemics, and ideas spreading. The aim of the symposium is to bring together researchers interested in the use of network science and human behavioral data to improve our understanding of the physics of human social behavior.

The Symposia will be hosted by NetSci'14 and located Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California. 

Submission deadline is April 1, 2014. Please visit the Call for Abstracts page for information on how to submit your abstract

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Connecting Paradigms

The New Science of Cities presents a herculean attempt to bring together widely fragmented approaches to making sense of human social organization with the goal of eventually establishing a consolidated “science of cities” able to answer our questions. Michael Batty bases his argument on the interplay among space, dynamics, and relations. He holds that “to understand place, we must understand flows, and to understand flows we must understand networks.” Batty (a geographer at University College London) also stresses two other principles: an intrinsic order of scale determines a city's form and function, and a science of cities should not merely observe but also predict. The book draws on the work of urbanists, economists, mathematicians, and physicists as well as almost five decades of his own contributions to urban studies.

 

Connecting Paradigms
. Michael Szell


Science 28 February 2014: 

Vol. 343 no. 6174 pp. 970-971
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1249599

 

The New Science of Cities by Michael Batty MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2013. 518 pp. $45, £31.95. ISBN 9780262019521. http://tinyurl.com/kgqugb5


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éToile Platform for Complexity Sciences now available in iPad and Android tablets

éToile Platform for Complexity Sciences now available in iPad and Android tablets | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The éToile Platform is an open, interactive, new way of sharing educational resources for Master and PhD levels in Complexity Sciences domains.

The éToile Platform is available in specific versions for iPad and for Android tablets. These versions are complementary to the website, light, and particularly adapted and well formatted for tablet iOS and Android operating systems.

The éToile community is invited to freely download and use any of the éToile tablet versions.

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The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become ‘stronger’, after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

 

The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption
Paul A. C. Duijn, Victor Kashirin & Peter M. A. Sloot

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 4238 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep04238 ;

 

See also documentary at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhk9ciHlzzo 


Via Complexity Digest, Complejidady Economía
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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:34 PM

My only critique of this, is that even by successfully disrupting the social networks, you will ont get rid of the foundations of crime within a society.

 

Greed, lust, violence, all of these things come from the brain and can be seen as mental health problems, rather than necessarily just societal problems.  I think we've got to begin ori sorting th the convected and post conicted crowd, such tht we can understand how their brains work and then, how to help heal them, such that we eliminate criminality and crime inspited lifestyles.  I understand there are dozens of easy ways to be opposed to this and that there are dozes more ways th work (especially here, in america, where we are soc focused on our small "selves" to forget that there is a much much much much larger world out thre, and that of ourselves as well.  We are connected to everyone and everything.  That's science.  To deny that it is otherwise is to invite delusion and hallucinations about reality and to invite other problems into your life and the rest of ours for your deliberate ignorance and unwillingness to escape to where reality simply is unoffensive and not politically motivated other than to help other people.

 

Therefore, let's overcome this monkey need to punish people for crimes they really didn't have much say in (thankst o the primacy of the brain) and start doing some research on these people (even though they should be confined from the rest of the population until treatments and diagnoses have been developed and concluded upon).

 

Think about it.

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Big Data, Little Questions?

Big Data, Little Questions? | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Big data. Little data. Deep data. Surface data. Noisy, unstructured data. Big. The world of data has gone from being analogue and digital, qualitative and quantitative, transactional and a by-product, to, simply, BIG. It is as if we couldn’t quite deal with its omnipotence and just ran out of adjectives. BIG. With all the data power it is supposedly meant to entail, one might have thought that a slightly better descriptive term might have been latched onto. But, no. BIG. Just BIG.

For those who may have missed the data obsessed world, ‘big data’ is causing a bit of storm. To be fair, it is more a future storm, with organisations, public and private firms and governments preparing for all that it will bring. Some say big data is already here and always has been, since we have always had more data than we know what to do with. (...)

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Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest Maps of Imaginary Places

Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest Maps of Imaginary Places | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Celebrated Italian novelist, philosopher, essayist, literary critic, and list-lover Umberto Eco has had a long fascination with the symbolic and the metaphorical, extending all the way back to his vintage semiotic children’s books. Half a century later, he revisits the mesmerism of the metaphorical and the symbolic in The Book of Legendary Lands (public library) — an illustrated voyage into history’s greatest imaginary places, with all their fanciful inhabitants and odd customs, on scales as large as the mythic continent Atlantis and as small as the fictional location of Sherlock Holmes’s apartment. A dynamic tour guide for the human imagination, Eco sets out to illuminate the central mystery of why such utopias and dystopias appeal to us so powerfully and enduringly, what they reveal about our relationship with reality, and how they bespeak the quintessential human yearning to make sense of the world and find our place in it — after all, maps have always been one of our greatest sensemaking mechanisms for life, which we’ve applied to everything from the cosmos to time to emotional memory.


Via carol s. (caravan café), @backbook
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Study maps Twitter’s information ecosystem

Study maps Twitter’s information ecosystem | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
New research outlines the six types of communities on the social network and what that means for communication

Via luiy
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, March 1, 2014 7:59 AM

What community do you belong to?

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 1, 2014 4:24 PM

Indeed, we each live in our own world, not in the real world per se.

 

Some, however, have a more accurate understanding of the real world and are willing to acknowledge their shortcomings.

 

The others, who are less inclined to explore and are more focused on their own self-production, just happen to be known as conservative in our culture.  Hence, they area always hindered from perceiving the real world in the strictest of senses, and are not likely to change in light of new information received from the outside world.

 

Non-adapting humans will equal a dead and dying species.  It's a shame, though, that we can be dragged down by them for our lack of effective effort and action.

 

Sad.

 

Think about it.

Fàtima Galan's curator insight, March 3, 2014 2:44 AM

"The topographical "maps" of these communities, generated by Pew using the data visualization tool NodeXL, aren’t just maps of relationships. They represent the channels of information in Twitter’s vast ecosystem, the roads and throughways, stoops and street corners in each topical neighborhood where users congregate and swap news and anecdotes."

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Competition among memes in a world with limited attention

Competition among memes in a world with limited attention | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The wide adoption of social media has increased the competition among ideas for our finite attention. We employ a parsimonious agent-based model to study whether such a competition may affect the popularity of different memes, the diversity of information we are exposed to, and the fading of our collective interests for specific topics. Agents share messages on a social network but can only pay attention to a portion of the information they receive. In the emerging dynamics of information diffusion, a few memes go viral while most do not. The predictions of our model are consistent with empirical data from Twitter, a popular microblogging platform. Surprisingly, we can explain the massive heterogeneity in the popularity and persistence of memes as deriving from a combination of the competition for our limited attention and the structure of the social network, without the need to assume different intrinsic values among ideas.

Via luiy
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luiy's curator insight, February 22, 2014 8:06 AM

Here we outline a number of empirical findings that motivate both our question and the main assumptions behind our model. We then describe the proposed agent-based toy model of meme diffusion and compare its predictions with the empirical data. Finally we show that the social network structure and our finite attention are both key ingredients of the diffusion model, as their removal leads to results inconsistent with the empirical data.

 

-----------------------------

Limited attention


We first explore the competition among memes. In particular, we test the hypothesis that the attention of a user is somewhat independent from the overall diversity of information discussed in a given period. Let us quantify the breadth of attention of a user through Shannon entropy S = −Σi f(i) log f(i) where f(i) is the proportion of tweets generated by the user about meme i. Given a user who has posted n messages, her entropy can be as small as 0, if all of her posts are about the same meme; or as large as log n if she has posted a message about each of n different memes. We can measure the diversity of the information available in the system analogously, defining f(i) as the proportion of tweets about meme i across all users. Note that these entropy-based measures are subject to the limits of our operational definition of a meme; finer or coarser definitions would yield different values.

 

John Caswell's curator insight, March 2, 2014 8:23 AM

Very intetesting! Attention spans!

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Today's Apps Are Turning Us Into Sociopaths

Today's Apps Are Turning Us Into Sociopaths | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
We’re observing the emergence of tech that doesn’t just augment our intellect and lives, but is now beginning to automate and outsource our humanity. I talked to the makers of BroApp, which sends automated daily text messages to your significant other (“seamless relationship outsourcing”). Shared here is their rationale, which I believe goes beyond just this one app -- and captures widely held convictions in the tech community we need to pay attention to.
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