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Tim Berners-Lee: We need to re-decentralize the Web

Tim Berners-Lee: We need to re-decentralize the Web | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Chris Woods Twenty-five years after the Web's inception, its creator has urged the public to reengage with its original design: a decentralized Internet that remains open to all.

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Artur Alves's curator insight, February 6, 2:29 PM

"Speaking with Wired editor David Rowan at an event launching the magazine's March issue, Tim Berners-Lee said that although part of this is about keeping an eye on for-profit Internet monopolies such as search engines and social networks, the greatest danger is the emergence of a balkanized Web.

(...)

It's the role of governments, startups, and journalists to keep that conversation at the fore, he added, because the pace of change is not slowing—it's going faster than ever before. For his part, Berners-Lee drives the issue through his work at the Open Data Institute, World Wide Web Consortium, and World Wide Web Foundation, but also as an MIT professor whose students are "building new architectures for the Web where it's decentralized." On the issue of monopolies, Berners-Lee did say that it's concerning to be "reliant on big companies and one big server," something that stalls innovation, but that competition has historically resolved these issues and will continue to do so."

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Joseph E. Stiglitz argues that bad policies in rich countries, not economic inevitability, have caused most people's standard of living to decline

Joseph E. Stiglitz argues that bad policies in rich countries, not economic inevitability, have caused most people's standard of living to decline | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The difficulties that many rich countries now face are not the result of the inexorable laws of economics, to which people simply must adjust, as they would to a natural disaster. On the contrary, the decline in most households' income over the past three decades, particularly in the US, is the result of flawed policies.
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 6, 9:55 AM

The economy is just a system.  If we figure out how it actually works, we could, theoretically, figure out how to produce optimal results for people through policies, programs and legal structures.  This may invovle having the government step back and allowing the market agents to work things out on their own.  But the principle that the government does not have an active role in shaping economic outcomes for one way or another is preposterous and shouldn't be considered "based in reality" anymore or as acceptable solutions to our problems.

 

Period.

Jeremy Wernik's curator insight, February 6, 12:41 PM

Even the most powerful and wealthy countries are being uncovered for flawed policies. This should be a wake up call for all wealthy countries should not have this happen. With such massive amounts of wealth, they should invest in keeping close watches on what there laws are creating.

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The Connected Past

The Connected Past | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

A community led by a multi-disciplinary international steering committee dedicated to the study of network science and theory in archaeology and history.


The 2014 conference will take place alongside CAA2014 Paris

 

Held Saturday April 26th 2014 in Sciences Po, rooms Albert Sorel and Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu, 27 rue Saint-Guillaume, 75007 Paris

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Simulating the past to understand human history: satellite in 10th conference of the European Social Simulation Association (ESSA)

SIMULATING THE PAST TO UNDERSTAND HUMAN HISTORY


The conference is organized with the contribution of the SimulPast project(www.simulpast.es), a 5-year exploratory research project funded by the SpanishGovernment (MICINN CSD2010-00034) that aims at developing an innovative andinterdisciplinary methodological framework to model and simulate ancient societies andtheir relationship with environmental transformations. To achieve these aims, SimulPastintegrates knowledge from diverse fields covering humanities, social, computationaland ecological sciences within a national and international network.


The conference intention is to showcase the result of the SimulPast project together withcurrent international research on the methodological and theoretical aspects of computersimulation in archaeological and historical contexts. The conference will bring togetherscholars from different disciplinary backgrounds (history, ecology, archaeology,anthropology, sociology, computer science and complex systems) in order to promotedeeper understanding and collaboration in the study of past human behavior and history

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SocInfo 2014 | 6th international conference on Social Informatics

We are delighted to welcome the 6th International Conference on Social Informatics (SocInfo 2014) to Barcelona, Spain, from November 10th to November 13th.SocInfo is an interdisciplinary venue for researchers from Computer Science, Informatics, Social Sciences and Management Sciences to share ideas and opinions, and present original research work on studying the interplay between socially-centric platforms and social phenomena. The ultimate goal of Social Informatics is to create better understanding of socially-centric platforms not just as a technology, but also as a set of social phenomena. To that end, we are inviting interdisciplinary papers, on applying information technology in the study of social phenomena, on applying social concepts in the design of information systems, on applying methods from the social sciences in the study of social computing and information systems, on applying computational algorithms to facilitate the study of social systems and human social dynamics, and on designing information and communication technologies that consider social context.

 

http://socinfo2014.org


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Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems

2014 Interdisciplinary Symposium  on  Complex Systems (ISCS'14)


Center for the Study of Complex Systems (CSDC)
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Florence, Florence, Italy
September 15 - 18, 2014


The main aim of the 2014 Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems is to bring together researchers working on complex systems. We invite scientists, philosophers, researchers, engineers, and young students to submit their works, attend, or register for tutorials.The main theme of this year is "How Nature Works".


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John Symons's curator insight, January 29, 8:05 PM

Please consider sending a paper/poster

António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 31, 4:50 AM

Just before ECCS2014 in September and also in Italy.

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Ricardo Hausmann proposes an alternative approach to economic development based on how the human brain functions

Ricardo Hausmann proposes an alternative approach to economic development based on how the human brain functions | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
The human brain makes predictions by finding similarities between the patterns in recent sensory inputs and previous experiences stored in its vast memory. The same process is now perfectly feasible for those engaged in promoting economic development.
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How a New Science of Cities Is Emerging from Mobile Phone Data Analysis | MIT Technology Review

How a New Science of Cities Is Emerging from Mobile Phone Data Analysis | MIT Technology Review | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Study the way people make mobile phone calls in metropolitan areas and you can see a city breathe, say computer scientists.
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Is Complete Online Privacy Possible? Infographic

Is Complete Online Privacy Possible? Infographic | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Check out this Infographic to learn everything that is there about Cookies. Is it harmful? Is it helpful? Do Cookies actually track your activities and land you in trouble?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Artur Alves
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Linda Denty's curator insight, January 27, 7:35 PM

Thanks Ana for sharing this. 

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Online learning environments in higher education: Connectivism vs. dissociation

Online learning environments in higher education: Connectivism vs. dissociation | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Over the last decade online education has emerged as a way for students and faculty to collaborate more freely, attain greater flexibility, and utilize new media to learn. The burning debate lies in whether online educational options are harmful to traditional education or offer endless benefits necessary to accommodate a 21st century learner. Supporters of virtual learning environments suggest that 21st century learners require the construction and creation capabilities offered through Web 2.0 to succeed while critics suggest that asynchronous interactions are not engaging and rigorous enough for higher education. A balanced online environment should provide a blend of both asynchronous and synchronous opportunities, which promote communication and collaboration among classmates and instructors.


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Steven Verjans's curator insight, January 26, 4:25 AM

An interesting article by Sarah Reese, in which she discusses benefits and drawbacks of the current online education hype, and suggests requirements for the virtual learning environment in modern higher education. Not really evidence-based, but a good argumentation nevertheless.

Eduardo Hamuy's curator insight, February 1, 5:26 AM

El aprendizaje en los EVA de la educación superior, parece proponer este libro, debe combinar interacciones sincrónicas y asíncronas. En conjunto logran el compromiso y la profundidad requeridas. 

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Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread—The Lessons from a New Science: Alex Pentland

Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread—The Lessons from a New Science

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For good or ill, big data and networks have taken over our lives and, unfortunately, they too often run amok. From the Arab Spring, mediated on Twitter and Facebook, to the NSA spying scandal, to the 2008 financial crash, big data and networks are causing wrenching changes but very rarely can we piece together why, how, or what do to about the problem.  Alex “Sandy” Pentland and his team have created a new data science that not only describes how networks of people behave but also creates actionable intelligence from that understanding.  Called “Social Physics,” it encapsulates social, analytical, computer, and managerial sciences into a synthesis that allows us to build more resilient and creative societies while at the same time providing greater protection for personal privacy and resistance to cyber attack.  Pentland’s new book, SOCIAL PHYSICS: How Good Ideas Spread—The Lessons from a New Science, is a landmark tour of this new science, offering revolutionary insights into the mysteries of collective intelligence and social influence.


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Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 7:24 PM

Adding this one to my reading list.

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To Each According to its Degree: The Meritocracy and Topocracy of Embedded Markets

To Each According to its Degree: The Meritocracy and Topocracy of Embedded Markets | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

A system is said to be meritocratic if the compensation and power available to individuals is determined by their abilities and merits. A system is topocratic if the compensation and power available to an individual is determined primarily by her position in a network. Here we introduce a model that is perfectly meritocratic for fully connected networks but that becomes topocratic for sparse networks-like the ones in society. In the model, individuals produce and sell content, but also distribute the content produced by others when they belong to the shortest path connecting a buyer and a seller. The production and distribution of content defines two channels of compensation: a meritocratic channel, where individuals are compensated for the content they produce, and a topocratic channel, where individual compensation is based on the number of shortest paths that go through them in the network. We solve the model analytically and show that the distribution of payoffs is meritocratic only if the average degree of the nodes is larger than a root of the total number of nodes. We conclude that, in the light of this model, the sparsity and structure of networks represents a fundamental constraint to the meritocracy of societies.

 

To Each According to its Degree: The Meritocracy and Topocracy of Embedded Markets
J. Borondo, F. Borondo, C. Rodriguez-Sickert & C. A. Hidalgo

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 3784 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep03784


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▶ Explaining things with flow

This is a short presentation of what you can do with a software called Bayesian Dynamical Systems. It can be used to find patterns in large amounts of data and is the result of a cooperation between Uppsala University and the Institute for Futures Studies in Stockholm.

Here the software is used to study the relation between economic growth and democracy, presented by David Sumpter.

The software is available i R: http://cran.r-project.org/web/package...

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Opening up open data: An interview with Tim O’Reilly

Opening up open data: An interview with Tim O’Reilly | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

We’re increasingly living in a world of black boxes. We don’t understand the way things work. And open-source software, open data are critical tools. We see this in the field of computer security. People say, “Well, we have to keep this secret.” Well, it turns out that the strongest security protocols are those that are secure even when people know how they work.
Secrecy is actually, it turns out, a fairly weak way of being secure. And I think in a similar way, we have to understand who owns the rules, how are they driven, how are they guiding our behavior. And there may be cases where you say, “Well, actually it’s a reasonable trade-off to have some degree of secrecy.”
We have this with trade secrets all the time in the commercial world. But there are other areas where we should say, “No, we really need to know how this works.”

 

http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/opening_up_open_data_an_interview_with_tim_o_reilly


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Measuring the Complexity of Self-organizing Traffic Lights

We apply measures of complexity, emergence and self-organization to an abstract city traffic model for comparing a traditional traffic coordination method with a self-organizing method in two scenarios: cyclic boundaries and non-orientable boundaries. We show that the measures are useful to identify and characterize different dynamical phases. It becomes clear that different operation regimes are required for different traffic demands. Thus, not only traffic is a non-stationary problem, which requires controllers to adapt constantly. Controllers must also change drastically the complexity of their behavior depending on the demand. Based on our measures, we can say that the self-organizing method achieves an adaptability level comparable to a living system.

 

Measuring the Complexity of Self-organizing Traffic Lights
Dario Zubillaga, Geovany Cruz, Luis Daniel Aguilar, Jorge Zapotecatl, Nelson Fernandez, Jose Aguilar, David A. Rosenblueth, Carlos Gershenson

http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.0197


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SFI: notes for the history of Complex Systems Science

This is the first in a series of articles recounting the history of the Santa Fe Institute drawn from primary and, in a few cases, secondary sources. 

By John German

 

In George Cowan's telling, the notion for a Santa Fe Institute began to form in the summer of 1956. He had been invited to the Aspen Institute, where prominent intellectuals from the arts, science, and culture gathered for free-form philosophical exchanges. He had just participated as the lone scientist in a discussion of literature. (...)

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Puppies! Now that I’ve got your attention, complexity theory

Animal behavior isn't complicated, but it is complex. Nicolas Perony studies how individual animals -- be they Scottish Terriers, bats or meerkats -- follow simple rules that, collectively, create larger patterns of behavior. And how this complexity born of simplicity can help them adapt to new circumstances, as they arise.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/nicolas_perony_puppies_now_that_i_ve_got_your_attention_complexity_theory.html


Via Complexity Digest, Jorge Louçã
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 4, 9:40 AM

The guy seems to be confessing some obscure personal sin but the talk is very interesting.

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Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, vi...

Via Lorien Pratt, António F Fonseca
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 1, 4:50 AM

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 7:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, MAIPM, CPPE's curator insight, April 16, 8:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

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Joseph E. Stiglitz pours cold water on rosy projections of faster recovery in Europe and the US

Joseph E. Stiglitz pours cold water on rosy projections of faster recovery in Europe and the US | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Economics is often called the dismal science, and for the last half-decade it has come by its reputation honestly in the advanced economies. Unfortunately, the year ahead will bring little relief.
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 5, 11:00 AM

To me, this seems very intuitive.

 

Even Adam Smith bemoaned the extraction of wealth into the hands of private companies from the general public.

 

How is it that we continue to support these methods which, actually, do more harm to the individual than good?  Just because you're turning a financial profit, after all, doesn't mean that you're actually enabling your health, in the grandest of schemes of things.

 

Think about it.

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Hedonometer

Hedonometer | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Hedonometer.org is an instrument that measures the happiness of large populations in real time.


Via Claudia Mihai, Complejidady Economía
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luiy's curator insight, February 5, 6:16 AM
Happiness

It’s what most people say they want. So how do we know how happy people are? You can’t improve or understand what you can’t measure. In a blow to happiness, we’re very good at measuring economic indices and this means we tend to focus on them. With hedonometer.org we’ve created an instrument that measures the happiness of large populations in real time.

 

Our hedonometer is based on people’s online expressions, capitalizing on data-rich social media, and we’re measuring how people present themselves to the outside world. For our first version of hedonometer.org, we’re using Twitter as a source but in principle we can expand to any data source in any language (more below). We’ll also be adding an API soon.

 

So this is just a start — we invite you to explore the Twitter time series and let us know what you think.

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 5, 11:03 AM

Isn't this what we're all looking for?

Happiness, health and well being?

 

There's a very good reason how Thomas Jefferson said "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness", rather than property.

 

Yet we've confused the two to such an extent that we end up having neither on the general, collective sense (which basically boils down to being the majority of the individuals living in a society).

 

Think about it.

Jean-Michel Livowsky's curator insight, February 6, 6:42 AM

La mesure électronique du bonheur et du bien-être... Le Bhoutan et le «bonheur national brut»  n'ont qu'a bien se tenir, il est vrai que le concept a été enterré depuis peu...

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What Social Networks Should You Use in 2014? [INFOGRAPHIC]

What Social Networks Should You Use in 2014? [INFOGRAPHIC] | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
We’re now into a whole new year – but which social networks should have your full attention this year?

Via Lauren Moss, António F Fonseca
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Amy Williamson's curator insight, February 5, 5:43 AM

A must read for anyone working in social media!

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, February 20, 1:54 PM

Thanks

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 30, 9:16 AM

Do you wonder where to put most of your online time for the best reach to viewers? Here is helpful info to help you decide.

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Old maps become 3D virtual worlds

Old maps become 3D virtual worlds | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The British Library has challenged video game design students to turn old maps and engravings from its collection into virtual worlds.

  


Via Tourism:Collaterals, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Delineating Geographical Regions with Networks of Human Interactions in an Extensive Set of Countries

Delineating Geographical Regions with Networks of Human Interactions in an Extensive Set of Countries | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Large-scale networks of human interaction, in particular country-wide telephone call networks, can be used to redraw geographical maps by applying algorithms of topological community detection. The geographic projections of the emerging areas in a few recent studies on single regions have been suggested to share two distinct properties: first, they are cohesive, and second, they tend to closely follow socio-economic boundaries and are similar to existing political regions in size and number. Here we use an extended set of countries and clustering indices to quantify overlaps, providing ample additional evidence for these observations using phone data from countries of various scales across Europe, Asia, and Africa: France, the UK, Italy, Belgium, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, and Ivory Coast. In our analysis we use the known approach of partitioning country-wide networks, and an additional iterative partitioning of each of the first level communities into sub-communities, revealing that cohesiveness and matching of official regions can also be observed on a second level if spatial resolution of the data is high enough. The method has possible policy implications on the definition of the borderlines and sizes of administrative regions.

 

Sobolevsky S, Szell M, Campari R, Couronné T, Smoreda Z, et al. (2013) Delineating Geographical Regions with Networks of Human Interactions in an Extensive Set of Countries. PLoS ONE 8(12): e81707. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0081707


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Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | Yaneer Bar-Yam

Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | Yaneer Bar-Yam | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

It is generally recognized that life is becoming more complex. This article analyzes the 
human social environment using the "complexity profile," a mathematical tool for 
characterizing the collective behavior of a system. The analysis is used to justify the 
qualitative observation that complexity of existence has increased and is increasing. The 
increase in complexity is directly related to sweeping changes in the structure and 
dynamics of human civilization—the increasing interdependence of the global economic 
and social system, and the instabilities of dictatorships, communism and corporate 
hierarchies. Our complex social environment is consistent with identifying global human 
civilization as an organism capable of complex behavior that protects its components 
(us) and which should be capable of responding effectively to complex environmental 
demands


Via Bernard Ryefield, António F Fonseca
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Lorien Pratt's curator insight, January 25, 9:47 PM

This is so important!  We all feel that things are becoming more complex, now here's some evidence to show we're right. And as we suspected, it comes from increasing interdependence and "sweeping changes in the structure and dynamics of civilization".   Thought so!

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 5, 4:34 PM

You see this in the devolution of religion from hierarchically based forms of morality.

 

Or on the decentralization of wealth from a handful of individuals to the general masses.

 

Or the collaborative work of government, rather than the command and control central systems that dominated the 20th century.

 

We're evolving.

 

And we've only begun this journey.

 

Think about it.

Anastasia Baranowski's curator insight, April 3, 2:40 PM

Dear Sirs,

 

I think that people from different nationalities have to have marriages between different nationalities. The idea is multinational planet, where people live everywhere they want and they don't have any ideas of nationalizm or rasism. In this case all people can live in peace and harmony. No wars, only worldwide police. Economical development is possible only if people from different countries can come to each other and co-operate. The most important problem behind the human race is ecological! All people on the planet have to co-operate and communicate and help each other to save the planet and themselves and future generations!

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Bayesian Dynamical Systems Modelling in the Social Sciences

Bayesian Dynamical Systems Modelling in the Social Sciences | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Data arising from social systems is often highly complex, involving non-linear relationships between the macro-level variables that characterize these systems. We present a method for analyzing this type of longitudinal or panel data using differential equations. We identify the best non-linear functions that capture interactions between variables, employing Bayes factor to decide how many interaction terms should be included in the model. This method punishes overly complicated models and identifies models with the most explanatory power. We illustrate our approach on the classic example of relating democracy and economic growth, identifying non-linear relationships between these two variables. We show how multiple variables and variable lags can be accounted for and provide a toolbox in R to implement our approach.

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