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Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, vi...

Via Lorien Pratt, António F Fonseca
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 1, 1:50 AM

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 4:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, MAIPM, CPPD's curator insight, April 16, 5:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

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ECCS'14 plenary sessions' speakers and parallel sessions' speakers

ECCS'14 plenary sessions' speakers and parallel sessions' speakers | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The plenary sessions' speakers are:

Lada Adamic

A-László Barabási

Franco Bernabè 

Raffaella Burioni

Claudio Castellano

Vittoria Colizza

Alain Destexhe

Albert Diaz-Guilera

Vladimir Falko

Silvio Franz

Carlo Jaeger

Wolfgang Kroeger

Stefano Mancuso

Amos Maritan

Mariana Mazzucato

Jose Soares Andrade Jr.

  

The parallel sessions' speakers are:

Hideaki Aoyama

Marc Barthelemy 

Ginestra Bianconi 

Paul Bourgine 

Silvia Capuani

Claudio Conti

Matthieu Cristelli 

Emanuela Del Gado

Ernesto Estrada 

Giancarlo Franzese 

Diego Garlaschelli 

Pietro Liò 

Marcelo Masera

Carmen Miguel 

Esteban Moro

Daniela Paolotti 

Matjaz Perc

Irena Vodenska

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Complex systems made simple

Complex systems made simple | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Network scientists at Northeastern have designed an algorithm capable of identifying the subset of components that reveal a complex system's overall nature.

Via Spaceweaver, Tim Williamson
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Eli Levine's curator insight, July 10, 11:02 AM

Way cool. And useful. 

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Connecting Core Percolation and Controllability of Complex Networks

Connecting Core Percolation and Controllability of Complex Networks | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Core percolation is a fundamental structural transition in complex networks related to a wide range of important problems. Recent advances have provided us an analytical framework of core percolation in uncorrelated random networks with arbitrary degree distributions. Here we apply the tools in analysis of network controllability. We confirm analytically that the emergence of the bifurcation in control coincides with the formation of the core and the structure of the core determines the control mode of the network. We also derive the analytical expression related to the controllability robustness by extending the deduction in core percolation. These findings help us better understand the interesting interplay between the structural and dynamical properties of complex networks.

Via Shaolin Tan, Alejandro J. Alvarez S., Tim Williamson
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Searching for superspreaders of information in real-world social media

Searching for superspreaders of information in real-world social media | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
A number of predictors have been suggested to detect the most influential spreaders of information in online social media across various domains such as Twitter or Facebook. In particular, degree, PageRank, k-core and other centralities have been adopted to rank the spreading capability of users in information dissemination media. So far, validation of the proposed predictors has been done by simulating the spreading dynamics rather than following real information flow in social networks. Consequently, only model-dependent contradictory results have been achieved so far for the best predictor. Here, we address this issue directly. We search for influential spreaders by following the real spreading dynamics in a wide range of networks. We find that the widely-used degree and PageRank fail in ranking users' influence. We find that the best spreaders are consistently located in the k-core across dissimilar social platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Livejournal and scientific publishing in the American Physical Society. Furthermore, when the complete global network structure is unavailable, we find that the sum of the nearest neighbors' degree is a reliable local proxy for user's influence. Our analysis provides practical instructions for optimal design of strategies for [ldquo]viral[rdquo] information dissemination in relevant applications.
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Have your say on the future of science: public consultation on Science 2.0

Have your say on the future of science: public consultation on Science 2.0 | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

The European Commission has launched a public consultation on ‘Science 2.0’, in order to gauge the trend towards a more open, data-driven and people-focused way of doing research and innovation. Researchers are using digital tools to get thousands of people participating

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CASM: Thematic series on Modeling large-scale communication networks using complex networks and agent-based modeling techniques

Complex Adaptive Systems Modeling welcomes submissions to the new thematic series on Modeling large-scale communication networks using complex networks and agent-based modeling techniques.
This thematic series intends to publish high quality original research as well as review articles on case studies, models and methods for the modeling and simulation of large-scale computer communication networks using either of the following two approaches:

 Complex networks (such as modeled using tools such as Gephi, Network Workbench and others) Agent-based models (such as based on NetLogo, Repast, Mason, Swarm and others)

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

Multiagent systemsCognitive Sensor NetworksWireless Sensor NetworksSensor Actuator NetworksCloud computing infra-structuresInternet of ThingsService-oriented architecturesPervasive/Mobile ComputingPeer-to-peer networks

 

http://www.casmodeling.com/about/update/COMM_NETS ;


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Modelling the short term herding behaviour of stock markets

Modelling the short term herding behaviour of stock markets | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Modelling the behaviour of stock markets has been of major interest in the past century. The market can be treated as a network of many investors reacting in accordance to their group behaviour, as manifested by the index and effected by the flow of external information into the system. Here we devise a model that encapsulates the behaviour of stock markets. The model consists of two terms, demonstrating quantitatively the effect of the individual tendency to follow the group and the effect of the individual reaction to the available information. Using the above factors we were able to explain several key features of the stock market: the high correlations between the individual stocks and the index; the Epps effect; the high fluctuating nature of the market, which is similar to real market behaviour. Furthermore, intricate long term phenomena are also described by this model, such as bursts of synchronized average correlation and the dominance of the index as demonstrated through partial correlation.
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Stanford computer scientists create crowdsourcing website to draw ... crowds

Stanford computer scientists create crowdsourcing website to draw ... crowds | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

"Stanford computer scientists have created a website to help organizers plan events that are more likely to succeed or allow them to pull the plug on impending flops before they occur.

The website, called Catalyst, is based on a behavioral science concept known as the threshold model of collective action, which posits that people may be reluctant to commit to participating in activity until they see others taking part, at which point interest surges and the activity becomes successful. But if participation doesn’t reach this threshold point, the event is likely to fail.

Catalyst builds this principle into software. The website allows people to enter a few details, such as date, time, description of the event and the number of participants needed to make it a success. If signups don't hit this threshold point by the deadline, Catalyst emails organizers and would-be participants a warning."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Stuart Shulman's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:26 AM

Howard was indeed ahead of his time and an early influence on my own digital divide and digital citizenship research.

Vonny~'s curator insight, December 13, 2013 3:49 PM

Has possibilities!!! :)

Terre Tulsiak's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:47 PM

Good concept but like meetup- what about those serial signer-uppers that don't show? You have to make an event seem VIP to get certain demographic to attend.

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Climate Change and Human Rights

by GUSTAV LANYI


We have become familiar with the concept of climate change as greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere and cause average global temperature to rise. No less than182 nations have agreed to cut their greenhouse gas emissions by ratifying the Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force in 2005 and is due to expire at the end of 2012. However, what do human rights — the rights we all have as human beings — have to do with climate change? Surprisingly, quite a lot, and the impacts are both direct and indirect. Many economic, social and cultural rights are impacted by climate change, including the rights to food, water, housing and health. Civil and political rights, such as the right to life, and the cultural rights of Indigenous people can also be impacted by climate change. This article examines these impacts,with a particular emphasis on Australia.
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New: Journal of Data Mining and Digital Humanities

New: Journal of Data Mining and Digital Humanities | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Digital Humanities is a convergence of humanities fields (linguistic, history, psychology…) using data archives, processing and interaction. Data mining is an interdisciplinary subfield of computer science, involving the methods at the intersection of artificial intelligence, machine learning and database systems. The Journal of Data Mining & Digital Humanities is concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities, with tools provided by computing such as data visualisation, information retrieval, statistics, text mining by publishing scholarly work beyond the traditional humanities.

 


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Meet the Father of Digital Life

Meet the Father of Digital Life | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

In 1953, at the dawn of modern computing, Nils Aall Barricelli played God. Clutching a deck of playing cards in one hand and a stack 

of punched cards in the other, Barricelli hovered over one of the world’s earliest and most influential computers, the IAS machine, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. During the day the computer was used to make weather forecasting calculations; at night it was commandeered by the Los Alamos group to calculate ballistics for nuclear weaponry. Barricelli, a maverick mathematician, part Italian and part Norwegian, had finagled time on the computer to model the origins and evolution of life.


Via Jorge Louçã
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What is India speaking: The "Hinglish" invasion

By Rana D. Parshad, Vineeta Chand, Neha Sinha, Nitu Kumari

arXiv:1406.4824 [cs.CL]

 

While language competition models of diachronic language shift are increasingly sophisticated, drawing on sociolinguistic components like variable language prestige, distance from language centers and intermediate bilingual transitionary populations, in one significant way they fall short. They fail to consider contact-based outcomes resulting in mixed language practices, e.g. outcome scenarios such as creoles or unmarked code switching as an emergent communicative norm. On these lines something very interesting is uncovered in India, where traditionally there have been monolingual Hindi speakers and Hindi/English bilinguals, but virtually no monolingual English speakers. While the Indian census data reports a sharp increase in the proportion of Hindi/English bilinguals, we argue that the number of Hindi/English bilinguals in India is inaccurate, given a new class of urban individuals speaking a mixed lect of Hindi and English, popularly known as "Hinglish". Based on predator-prey, sociolinguistic theories, salient local ecological factors and the rural-urban divide in India, we propose a new mathematical model of interacting monolingual Hindi speakers, Hindi/English bilinguals and Hinglish speakers. The model yields globally asymptotic stable states of coexistence, as well as bilingual extinction. To validate our model, sociolinguistic data from different Indian classes are contrasted with census reports: We see that purported urban Hindi/English bilinguals are unable to maintain fluent Hindi speech and instead produce Hinglish, whereas rural speakers evidence monolingual Hindi. Thus we present evidence for the first time where an unrecognized mixed lect involving English but not "English", has possibly taken over a sizeable faction of a large global population.


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COMPOLICY – Complex evolutionary dynamics: actors, territories and policies

a Satellite Meeting in the European Conference on Complex System 2014

September 24, 2014 (Morning), Lucca, Italy

Organising committee

Francesco Niglia, Dimitri Gagliardi, Fatihcan Atay, Mercedes Bleda, Timoteo Carletti, Angelo Corallo, Valerio Eletti, Corentin Fontaine.

Rationale on the workshop

A real socio-economic system can be also identified by territorial and social boundaries: a city, a region etc. The actors therein operating are firms, markets, industrial clusters and are embedded in regional and national innovation systems. An emerging approach identifies the socio-economic system as a ‘smart territory’ characterised by the flow of citizens; the domain of interest is that of public services. Smart territories require business integrated services and long term sustainability, whilst their governance require 2.0 making tools, enabling the sharing of targets between policy makers, innovation and growth strategies and monitoring.

The general idea of this satellite is that these advances can significantly enhance evolutionary explanations of dynamic economic phenomena, and that as complex adaptive systems (CAS) theory constitutes the appropriate analytical framework within which analyse the evolution of socio-economic systems. CAS theory is increasingly being used in socio-economic contexts since the widely accepted view that all social and economic systems are complex adaptive systems has led to important advances on how the general properties of CAS are translated or understood in the economic and the organizational fields.

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Decision Making in a Complex and Uncertain World

Decision Making in a Complex and Uncertain World | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
This course will teach you the first principles of complexity, uncertainty and how to make decisions in a complex world.

Via Jorge Louçã
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Quantifying ‘Causality’ in Complex Systems: Understanding Transfer Entropy

Quantifying ‘Causality’ in Complex Systems: Understanding Transfer Entropy | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

‘Causal’ direction is of great importance when dealing with complex systems. Often big volumes of data in the form of time series are available and it is important to develop methods that can inform about possible causal connections between the different observables. Here we investigate the ability of the Transfer Entropy measure to identify causal relations embedded in emergent coherent correlations. We do this by firstly applying Transfer Entropy to an amended Ising model. In addition we use a simple Random Transition model to test the reliability of Transfer Entropy as a measure of ‘causal’ direction in the presence of stochastic fluctuations. In particular we systematically study the effect of the finite size of data sets.

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Just say no to impact factors

Just say no to impact factors | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Campaigners against the use of journal impact factors as a proxy for research excellence received a shot in the arm last night with the launch of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA). With an impressive line-up of founding signatories, including individual scientists, research funders and journal editors, DORA states in no uncertain terms that journal impact factors (which rank journals by the average number of citations their articles receive over a given period) should not be used "as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist's contribution, or in hiring, promotion or funding decisions."


Via Jorge Louçã
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The embedded power of algorithms

The embedded power of algorithms | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

David Beer on Facebook's "experiment" and what it reveals about the power of algorithms to shape our lives and perception.


Via Artur Alves
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Artur Alves's curator insight, July 3, 3:49 AM
« Rather than being an exception, the Facebook news feed revelations might actually be understood as just one revealing example of the embedded part that algorithms now play in our lives. The power of algorithms is to be found in the way that they sort, filter and manipulate the things that we encounter. This is not new. This is part of an established set of media infrastructures in which we now live – the power of which has been escalating over recent years with the incorporation of mobile devices into our bodily practices, with new types of mediated consumption, streaming, and the general rise of data accumulation and extraction. If we pause to reflect, we can begin to imagine the scale of influence that algorithms are now capable of having upon our lives. Algorithms define what is visible to us. The result is that they have the power to shape our tastes, to reconfigure our interests and to potentially define how we understand and engage with the world around us. (...) But what emerges from the Facebook news feed story is the critical point that these algorithmic media forms are not neutral. That is to say, it is not just when they are explicitly being used to manipulate emotions that they have consequences. These algorithms are always filtering and sorting, and as such, they are making decisions about what is visible. These are active systems that shape our encounters and our everyday experiences. In many instances they are largely invisible within the technical structures of which they are a part. Each of these algorithmic processes might look inconsequential: a recommendation of a TV show here, or a suggestion of who to follow there. But taken collectively, we can see their potential power. «
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Facebook’s Unethical Experiment Manipulated Users’ Emotions

Facebook’s Unethical Experiment Manipulated Users’ Emotions | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Facebook has been experimenting on us. A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that Facebook intentionally manipulated the news feeds of almost 700,000 users in order to study “emotional contagion through social networks.”  The study raises a number of ethics and privacy issues, since no authorization or warning was issued for the experiment.


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Artur Alves's curator insight, June 29, 4:47 AM

Social scientists team up with Facebook, manipulate data feeds, and ignore ethical good practices in experiments with human subjects.

 

 

«Facebook has been experimenting on us. A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that Facebook intentionally manipulated the news feeds of almost 700,000 users in order to study “emotional contagion through social networks.”

The researchers, who are affiliated with Facebook, Cornell, and the University of California–San Francisco, tested whether reducing the number of positive messages people saw made those people less likely to post positive content themselves. The same went for negative messages: Would scrubbing posts with sad or angry words from someone’s Facebook feed make that person write fewer gloomy updates?

(...)

Here is the only mention of “informed consent” in the paper: The research “was consistent with Facebook’s Data Use Policy, to which all users agree prior to creating an account on Facebook, constituting informed consent for this research.”

That is not how most social scientists define informed consent.

 

(...)

Over the course of the study, it appears, the social network made some of us happier or sadder than we would otherwise have been. Now it’s made all of us more mistrustful. «

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Seeing Color Through Infographics and Data Visualizations

Seeing Color Through Infographics and Data Visualizations | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Color is a crucial part of our visual experience. It indicates many things in our lives, from the ripeness of a banana, to how someone is feeling, to which subway line we should be on. Not everyone sees colors the same way, and colors have drastically different meanings in different cultures, but one thing we all have in common: color is important. These visualizations all show us different things about colors. Let’s start with the Meaning of Colors in Different Cultures. What Colors Mean in Different Cultures infographic   And the Psychology of Color depends somewhat on culture, but some of it goes deeper than that, as we can see by multiple cultures tying similar meanings to similar colors. The Psychology of Color infographic by Dehahs. You can be certain that big companies know this, and they choose their colors wisely based on that psychology. So, what are the... keep reading


Via Jorge Louçã
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How to speak so that people want to listen

How to speak so that people want to listen | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening? Here's Julian Treasure to help. In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to's of powerful speaking — from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy. A talk that might help the world sound more beautiful.
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M.I.T.'s Alex Pentland: Measuring Idea Flows to Accelerate Innovation

M.I.T.'s Alex Pentland: Measuring Idea Flows to Accelerate Innovation | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it
Alex Pentland says data, sensors and smartphones are opening the door to what he calls “social physics.” It is the subject of his new book, about the implications of being able to monitor and measure the flow of ideas in companies, markets and communities as never before. The payoff, he says, should be the acceleration of the pace of innovation.

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, April 15, 2:04 PM

I've visited Pentland's lab and have interviewed him. He knows what he's doing, and his work always has both an empirical basis and positive social impact in mind. The connection might be tangential, but I feel there is a connection between the Social Physics that Pentland writes about and the "soft" knowledge needed to understand and effectively manage augmented collective intelligence.

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The Complexity of Social Norms

The Complexity of Social Norms | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Xenitidou, Maria, Edmonds, Bruce (Eds.)

 

This book explores the view that normative behaviour is part of a complex of social mechanisms, processes and narratives that are constantly shifting. From this perspective, norms are not a kind of self-contained social object or fact, but rather an interplay of many things that we label as norms when we ‘take a snapshot’ of them at a particular instant. Further, this book pursues the hypothesis that considering the dynamic aspects of these phenomena sheds new light on them.

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Against the Smart City

Against the Smart City | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

Post by Michael Batty

Absolutely the best thing to read on the corporate hype and innuendos from the big computer companies pedalling the idea of ‘the smart city’. Adam Greenfield’s new book – that you can only get on Kindle and which was my first Kindle purchase that I read on my iPad (a success I must say) – is a wonderful and eloquent essay on the extreme hype surrounding the top down new town-like smart cities of Songdo (in South Korea), Masdar (in the UAE), PlanIT Valley (near Paredes in Portugal). He also comments on Singapore, Rio de Janeiro and some of the other established cities who are injecting automation into their urban services and other functions from the top down. His message is that most of the smart cities hype associated with IBM, Cisco, and Siemens amongst others which he recounts in detail is based on the most simplistic of notions as to what a city actually is. 

(...)

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Luciano Lampi's curator insight, July 3, 3:30 AM

Smart.....Intelligent.....Complex?

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Uncovering Randomness and Success in Society

An understanding of how individuals shape and impact the evolution of society is vastly limited due to the unavailability of large-scale reliable datasets that can simultaneously capture information regarding individual movements and social interactions. We believe that the popular Indian film industry, “Bollywood”, can provide a social network apt for such a study. Bollywood provides massive amounts of real, unbiased data that spans more than 100 years, and hence this network has been used as a model for the present paper. The nodes which maintain a moderate degree or widely cooperate with the other nodes of the network tend to be more fit (measured as the success of the node in the industry) in comparison to the other nodes. The analysis carried forth in the current work, using a conjoined framework of complex network theory and random matrix theory, aims to quantify the elements that determine the fitness of an individual node and the factors that contribute to the robustness of a network. The authors of this paper believe that the method of study used in the current paper can be extended to study various other industries and organizations.

 

Jalan S, Sarkar C, Madhusudanan A, Dwivedi SK (2014) Uncovering Randomness and Success in Society. PLoS ONE 9(2): e88249. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088249


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How Do Online Social Networks Grow?

How Do Online Social Networks Grow? | Non-Equilibrium Social Science | Scoop.it

by Konglin Zhu, Wenzhong Li, Xiaoming Fu, Jan Nagler


Online social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Gowalla allow people to communicate and interact across borders. In past years online social networks have become increasingly important for studying the behavior of individuals, group formation, and the emergence of online societies. Here we focus on the characterization of the average growth of online social networks and try to understand which are possible processes behind seemingly long-range temporal correlated collective behavior. In agreement with recent findings, but in contrast to Gibrat's law of proportionate growth, we find scaling in the average growth rate and its standard deviation. In contrast, Renren and Twitter deviate, however, in certain important aspects significantly from those found in many social and economic systems. Whereas independent methods suggest no significance for temporally long-range correlated behavior for Renren and Twitter, a scaling analysis of the standard deviation does suggest long-range temporal correlated growth in Gowalla. However, we demonstrate that seemingly long-range temporal correlations in the growth of online social networks, such as in Gowalla, can be explained by a decomposition into temporally and spatially independent growth processes with a large variety of entry rates. Our analysis thus suggests that temporally or spatially correlated behavior does not play a major role in the growth of online social networks.

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