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Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency
Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use effciency research at the John Innes Centre
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Stockholm University presents Honorary Doctorate to JIC scientist | News from the John Innes Centre

Stockholm University presents Honorary Doctorate to JIC scientist | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Professor Ray Dixon has been presented with an honorary doctorate by Stockholm University. Professor Dixon received this honour in recognition of his four decades of research into the regulation of gene expression, focussing particularly on the genes that control nitrogen fixation in bacteria.

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JIC receives a share of £20M investment for UK Synthetic Biology research | News from the John Innes Centre

JIC receives a share of £20M investment for UK Synthetic Biology research | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Professor Giles Oldroyd of the John Innes Centre has been awarded £2.5M from the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) to begin developing cereal crops that can ‘fix’ their own nitrogen, making their own fertiliser. This is part of £20M of funding for synthetic biology projects announced by the Chancellor George Osborne to investigate major global challenges, such as reducing agriculture’s reliance on nitrogen fertilisers. The aim is to initiate the first steps of nitrogen fixation in wheat, the major UK cereal crop and global staple. It complements the recent funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation focused on maize, a staple crop for small-scale farmers in sub-Saharan Africa.

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BBC Radio 4 - Farming Today, 16/10/2012

BBC Radio 4 - Farming Today, 16/10/2012 | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

On World Food Day, Anna Hill looks at how we may feed the rising world population. Anna discovers two very different attempts to grow more wheat in Africa - efforts to make GM wheat with nitrogen-fixing ability at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, and a new study that encourages farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa to grow certain conventionally-bred varieties and thus unlock the area's underused potential for wheat.

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Major investment to persuade bacteria to help cereals self-fertilise | News from the John Innes Centre

Major investment to persuade bacteria to help cereals self-fertilise | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

The John Innes Centre will lead a $9.8m research project to investigate whether it is possible to initiate a symbiosis between cereal crops and bacteria. The symbiosis could help cereals access nitrogen from the air to improve yields.

The five-year research project, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, could have most immediate benefit for subsistence farmers.

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Wheat to make the most of N - 7/6/2007 - Farmers Weekly

Wheat to make the most of N - 7/6/2007 - Farmers Weekly | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
Tasters of work being done at Rothamsted Research were given to its Association members last week.
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Our daily bread

Our daily bread | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
FOR the past decade maize has been the seed companies' favoured crop. Research spending on it runs at $1.5 billion a year, four times that for wheat. And it shows. Maize yields in 1990-2008 rose by 1.8% a year, close to their long-term average; wheat yields increased by less than half that, half their historic average.
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Second Agricultural Revolution In The Offing

Second Agricultural Revolution In The Offing | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Scientists at the John Innes Centre, Norwich and Washington State University, have managed to trigger nodulation in legumes, a key element of the nitrogen fixing process, without the bacteria normally necessary for this to occur. Detailing their work in Nature, the researchers say their investigations could lead to the ability to trigger nitrogen fixation in non-legume crops, which would dramatically reduce the world's need for inorganic fertilizers.

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Food Security - What Next?

Food Security - What Next? | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

JIC scientists are currently experimenting with helping rice host these helpful bacteria, which might be achievable using genetic modification. Extending the range of crops able to fix nitrogen would revolutionise the potential for global sustainability by massively reducing the carbon footprint of agriculture. This is a long term aspiration at JIC.

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New research may reduce global need for nitrogen fertilizers | News from the John Innes Centre

New research may reduce global need for nitrogen fertilizers | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

esearch published today in the journal Nature reveals how scientists at the John Innes Centre (JIC), Norwich and Washington State University, USA have managed to trigger nodulation in legumes, a key element of the nitrogen fixing process, without the bacteria normally necessary. This is an important step towards transferring nodulation, and possibly nitrogen fixation, to non-legume crops which could reduce the need for inorganic fertilizers.
The researchers, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the Royal Society and the US National Science Foundation, have used a key gene that legumes require to establish the interaction with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria to trigger the growth of root nodules, even in the absence of the bacteria.

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Perfect peas to push profits and cut carbon | News from the John Innes Centre

Perfect peas to push profits and cut carbon | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Scientists, pea breeders and the food industry are collaborating to discover how taste and tenderness can be determined by biochemistry and genetics. They will work together to hone the make-up of a perfect pea.

In a £1.5M, 3.5-year project coordinated from the John Innes Centre, the project partners will find new ways to develop improved pea varieties for the high profit margin food market. They will also study the likely impact of greater uptake of legume farming on nitrogen fertiliser use.

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Genome sequence sheds new light on how plants evolved nitrogen-fixing symbioses | News from the John Innes Centre

Genome sequence sheds new light on how plants evolved nitrogen-fixing symbioses | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

The genome of Medicago, a close relative of alfalfa and a long-established model for the study of legume biology, has been sequenced by an international team of scientists, capturing around 94 per cent of its genes.

The research gives new insights into the evolution of the Papilionoid subfamily of legumes, which includes peas, soybean and all legumes grown as crops.

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Getting to the roots of the problem. « microbelog

Getting to the roots of the problem. « microbelog | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
In one of the more exciting genetic modification projects, scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich are trying to engineer wheat that can produce its own fertiliser. There is also growing interest in understanding the role of ...

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Bill Gates donates £6.4m grant to British scientists for GM crops in one of the largest single investments to project

Bill Gates donates £6.4m grant to British scientists for GM crops in one of the largest single investments to project | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
British scientists have won a £6.4million grant from Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates to develop genetically modified crops.
The Gates Foundation’s donation is one of the largest single investments to the GM project in the UK.

The John Innes Centre in Norwich will use the fund to cultivate corn, wheat and rice capable of taking nitrogen from the air, meaning they need little or no fertiliser.

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City scientists win £2.5m to make super-wheat - Politics - Eastern Daily Press

City scientists win £2.5m to make super-wheat - Politics - Eastern Daily Press | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
Scientific work at a Norwich research centre that could slash the cost of producing wheat in the UK has been backed by a £2.5m government grant.

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Plant interaction with friendly bacteria gives pathogens their break | News from the John Innes Centre

Plant interaction with friendly bacteria gives pathogens their break | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Professor Giles Oldroyd of the John Innes Centre explains how plant roots form beneficial interactions with soil microbes. Almost all plants associate with mycorrhizal fungi to help in the uptake of nutrients such as phosphate. Some plants, particularly legumes, also associate with bacteria that ‘fix’ atmospheric nitrogen into a form the plant can use as fertiliser.

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New project aims to grow the perfect pea | News | Farmers Guardian

New project aims to grow the perfect pea | News | Farmers Guardian | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

SCIENTISTS, pea breeders and the food industry are working together to discover how taste and tenderness can be determined by biochemistry and genetics in a bid to hone the perfect pea.

A new £1.5 million, three-and-a-half year project, co-ordinated by the BBSRC’s John Innes Centre, aims to find new ways to develop improved pea varieties for the high profit margin food market. They will study the likely impact of greater uptake of legume farming on nitrogen fertiliser use.

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Is there a future for GM in this country? | Features | Farmers Guardian

Is there a future for GM in this country? | Features | Farmers Guardian | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Improved nitrogen utilisation - By maximising efficiency in the plant's nitrogen use, this technology would help reduce the need for fertiliser.

Colin Merrit, head of external affairs at Monsanto UK, says: “It's about getting more from what you are putting in - so we could get yield increments or, we could get the same yield as we are already seeing, but dramatically reduce fertiliser use in the process.”

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Crops could make their own fertilizer : Nature News

Crops could make their own fertilizer : Nature News | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
Plant geneticists have induced plants to form 'fertilizer factories' without the aid of bacteria that are normally crucial to the process. If the technology can be transferred to plants such as wheat or rice, industrial fertilization of these crops could be reduced or even abolished
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Pioneering research gives hope for food security - 9/8/2009 - Farmers Weekly

Pioneering research gives hope for food security - 9/8/2009 - Farmers Weekly | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
Cereals able to make their own nitrogen could become a reality after a scientific breakthrough in root nodule research...
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Times Higher Education - Nitrogen fertilizers get laboratory fix

13 October 1995
Kam Patel
A Pounds 10 million laboratory for research into the mysteries of nitrogen fixation, a fundamental process that helps to ensure the growth of healthy plants, will open next week at the John Innes Centre, Norwich.

Every year farmers in the United Kingdom spend about Pounds 450 million on nitrogenous fertilizer to ensure healthy crops. Worldwide, 60 million tonnes of nitrogen is used as fertilizer. A further 90 million tonnes is introduced into soils through the action of bacteria which convert nitrogen into fertilizer. In agriculture, the most important contributions result from the action of these bacteria in conjunction with legumes such as peas, beans, lentils and clover.

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Fewer fertilisers | Antenna | Science Museum

Fewer fertilisers | Antenna | Science Museum | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Fertilisers are mixtures of chemicals that keep plants healthy. Without nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, plants cannot grow or mature properly.

But manufacturing fertilisers requires huge amounts of energy, which is expensive and contributes to climate change. When it rains, the chemicals wash from fields into rivers and streams and can damage the ecosystem.
Can GM help? Giles Oldroyd, a plant expert at the John Innes Centre, thinks so. He is creating rice that can produce fertiliser from thin air...

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Sowing a future for peas | News from the John Innes Centre

Sowing a future for peas | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

New research from the John Innes Centre and the Central Science Laboratory could help breeders to develop pea varieties able to withstand drought stress and climate change. The research also shows that the composition of crops is likely to change with the climate.

“While many compounds have been reported to change in laboratory based drought stress experiments, few have identified how such compounds change in crops under field conditions,” says Dr Claire Domoney of the John Innes Centre.

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JIC geneticists find pea quality controls | News from the John Innes Centre

JIC geneticists find pea quality controls | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

Legumes, such as peas, are an economically important source of protein for food and animal feed, and there has been a constant drive to improve the content and quality of protein in these crops. Targetted breeding programmes have faced difficulties, due to the complex genetic basis for these traits. Recent research by Claire Domoney’s group, supported by the Defra-funded Pulse Crop Genetic Improvement Network (PGIN) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) has uncovered some of the genetic controls that determine these qualities, which could provide robust genetic markers for future breeding programmes.

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Legumes give nitrogen-supplying bacteria special access pass | News from the John Innes Centre

Legumes give nitrogen-supplying bacteria special access pass | News from the John Innes Centre | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it

A 120-year debate on how nitrogen-fixing bacteria are able to breach the cell walls of legumes has been settled. A paper to be published on Monday 19th December by John Innes Centre scientists reports that plants themselves allow bacteria in.

Once inside the right cells, these bacteria take nitrogen from the air and supply it to legumes in a form they can use, ammonia. Whether the bacteria breach the cell walls by producing enzymes that degrade it, or the plant does the work for them, has been contested since an 1887 paper in which the importance of the breach was first recognised.

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BBC - GM crop scientists win $10m grant

BBC - GM crop scientists win $10m grant | Nitrogen fixation and nitrate use efficiency | Scoop.it
A team of British plant scientists wins a $10m (£6.4m) grant from the Gates Foundation to develop GM cereal crops.
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