Nicole's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Nicole's A Midsummer Night's Dream
A Midsummer Night's Dream Scoop.it! Project CP English 10
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A Midsummer Night's Dream

This was taken from an old, out-of-print vhs tape. No commercial re-release to my knowledge at the time of upload. No infringement is intended. If you are th...
Nicole Provencal's insight:

Play at; 1:50

The part of the video shown, is when Hermia's father brings her to the king and complains about Hermia not wanting to marry the man she tells her to. The story is narrated by Puck.

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Historical Article: "This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Historical Article: "This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Nicole's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Nicole Provencal's insight:

"Although it is quite common to consider Puck a "trickster" in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, extended discussion of that idea appears to be relatively rare."

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Oberon & Titania

Oberon & Titania | Nicole's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Nicole Provencal's insight:

This image represents Oberon sneaking over to his fairy queen's bed while she's in her sleep. What's he doing to his beloved wife, you may ask? He's casting a spell. This spell he's casting on Titania, will make her fall in love with the most unsightly creature she comes across. Why is he doing this? He's doing this so that he can take back the child she is holding and taking care of, and lock him up, as though what he thinks is best. He believes that when his wife falls in love with this unsightly creature, she'll be so distracted with love, that she won't notice when he steals the child. He doesn't believe the child deserves to live in the arms of a king and queehn. He thinks the child should be locked up, especially for the reason that he tore his gorgeous wife, away from him. He doesn't want to fight with her, but he also doesn't want to keep the child. What should he do? I think the better question is; what will he do? 

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Literary Criticism: Review of A Midsummer Night's Dream

Literary Criticism: Review of A Midsummer Night's Dream | Nicole's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Nicole Provencal's insight:

"After an absence of 15 years, David Thacker returned to directing Shakespeare with A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Octagon Theatre in Bolton." "In the programme notes, David Thacker states that his use of the 1960s as the period for Dream was predicated on the idea that the ‘‘popular culture of the 60s was obsessed with being in love or falling in love"

 

’’.

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Source: Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter

Source:                                                                      Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter | Nicole's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Nicole Provencal's insight:

"Sometimes he was an old man, other times a child. Sometimes he was a bird or a beast, an eagle or an ass. Other times he was a goblin or an imp. A thousand years ago, be was the devil himself." Shakespeare's character, Puck, could be anything and everything he wanted to be. In the movie/novel, Puck is a fairy who can still shape shift, yet can summon the fog as well. Puck is seen in many other Shakespear plays, films, and other novels, as well as in mythological stories. 

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