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Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Breast Cancer News
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Australia ranks high in breast cancer survival

Australia ranks high in breast cancer survival | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it
Australian women with breast cancer are more likely to be alive three years after diagnosis than women in a range of other high-income countries, a large population-based study shows.

Via Susan Zager
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

This article shows that Australia has one of the highest rates of survivng breast cancer. The statistics show found overall three-year survival was highest in Australia (92%) which is great news for current breat cancer patients.

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Aaron Porteous's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:13 PM

Australia is pretty awesome.

Jeremy E Harrison's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:29 PM

This gives hope for women who develop breast cancer in their lives becuase of Australia's greater chance of survival for women with breast cancer.

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Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Amazing Science
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Redhead Pigment Boosts Melanoma Risk Even Without Sun

Redhead Pigment Boosts Melanoma Risk Even Without Sun | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it

"Ginger" mice are found to be more susceptible to melanoma even without any exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

 

Fair-skinned, red-haired people know — sometimes through painful experience — that they are more susceptible to the damaging effects of the Sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, including sunburn, skin ageing and a higher risk of skin cancers. But a study suggests that in mice, the pigment responsible for reddish coloring has a role in the development of melanoma.

 

“There is something about the redhead genetic background that is behaving in a carcinogenic fashion, independent of UV,” says David Fisher, a cancer biologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, who led the study. “It means that shielding from UV would not be enough.”

 

Compared to people with darker skin, those with fair, freckly skin and red hair produce a different form of the pigment melanin. This red–yellow form, called pheomelanin, is less effective at protecting the skin from UV damage than the darker form, eumelanin. The difference is caused by a mutation in the gene MC1R.

 

But for a number of years there have been hints that UV exposure alone might not account entirely for the risk of melanoma in redheads. Fisher and his team wanted to investigate the molecular backdrop for this increased risk. The researchers looked at how melanomas develop in mouse models of olive-skinned, ginger and albino colouring. The last group had the same genetic background as the dark-skinned mice but lacked the enzyme needed to synthesize melanin. The researchers also tweaked each group’s genes to be more susceptible to developing benign moles, which Fisher says is a probable first step in the development of melanoma.

 

The researchers planned to expose the mice to UV light and monitor differences in melanoma development. But before they got to that part of the experiment, about half the ginger mice had developed melanomas. Fisher says that he and his team were shocked. “The first thing we needed to do was bring a UV meter into the animal room to be sure there wasn’t some inadvertent UV being radiated out of the light bulbs or something,” he says. “And it turned out there was not.” The result suggested that the pigment itself was a cause of melanoma. The researchers suggest that the increased melanoma risk could have something to do with the pigment-production process, or a by-product of it, in melanin-containing cells called melanocytes.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

this article shows that red heads are more prone to skin cancer. “There is something about the redhead genetic background that is behaving in a carcinogenic fashion, independent of UV,” says David Fisher.

Even without the sun, redheads are able to get skin cancer from UV lights. This is a terrible result for red heads as they are prone to skin cancer. So they must slip, slop, slap and wrap to minimise their risks of skin cancer.

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'Lifestyle' diseases the world's biggest killer - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

'Lifestyle' diseases the world's biggest killer - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it

This article discusses how lifestyle diseases are now the leading cause of death around the world, especially developing countries.

it is believed apon research that lifestyle diseases are responsible for 63 per cent of global deaths. this is an extremely large percentage.

it also has other fasinating statistics about this troubling issue.


Via Lauren O'Neill
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

Dr Ala Alwan said lifestyle diseases are responsible for 63 per cent of global deaths based on WHO's estimates for 2008. Which is an enormous amount. The main causes of the lifestyle disease are tabacoo, poor diet and hurmful amounts of alcohol.

having tabacoo and harmful use of alcohol abd lead to many bad diseases such as diabetes.

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Is Capitalism To Blame for Worldwide Obesity?

Is Capitalism To Blame for Worldwide Obesity? | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it

Why do people get fat, increasing their personal risk of heart disease, diabetes and other "lifestyle" diseases and society's risk of fiscal collapse from the expense of treating millions of people with those ailments? Conventional wisdom, favored by governments and a vast and growing "wellness industry" around the world, is that it's because individuals can't control themselves.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

Why do people get fat, increasing their personal risk of heart disease, diabetes and other "lifestyle" diseases and society's risk of fiscal collapse from the expense of treating millions of people with those ailments? 


What the article is stating is tht rather telling people that you should be excersing, people should be educating others on the effects and how to avoid obesity 

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Grace Hennessy's curator insight, November 4, 2013 6:13 PM

This Article implys that a poor diet increases the risk of heart disease, diabetetes and other lifestyle dieases. and its now becoming a serious issuse for people around the world as the percentage of obsesity has grown immesively over the past 5 years.

Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Sustain Our Earth
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How Changes To Your Diet and Exercise Regime Could Transform Your Cells -- And Your Life

How Changes To Your Diet and Exercise Regime Could Transform Your Cells -- And Your Life | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it

Eat whole foods. Exercise. Meditate. Rely on supportive family and friends. All of these things have been linked, whether independently or together, with better health. And now, a new study shows it's never too late to start reaping the benefits of a healthy lifestyle.

 

The study, published in the journal The Lancet Oncology, shows that healthy lifestyle changes can have an impact on aging and age-related diseases on a cellular level, by increasing the length of telomeres. 


Via SustainOurEarth
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

Eating healthy foods leads to a healthy lifestyle and it is never to late to statrt.


"We know from earlier studies that eating an unhealthy diet, smoking cigarettes, being under chronic emotional stress, loneliness and depression may shorten telomeres. But this is the first one we can actually increase the length of them," said the doctor



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Grace Hennessy's curator insight, November 4, 2013 6:17 PM

this article highlights the importants of eating healthing, your body is your temple so its important to have a healthy diet which requries a lifestyle change. and this article states that its never too late to start a healthy lifestyle. 

Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from CCW Yr 8 Adolescence & Relationships
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Teenage risk-taking: how to handle it

Teenage risk-taking: how to handle it | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it
An overview of why teens sometimes try risky behaviour, and what parents can do to reduce risk-taking behaviour and keep teenagers safe.

Via Mandy Walker
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

This article is great for parents and carers to read if they are trying to control their risk taking kids. I also believe it is wise for the teenager to have a read of the article as it will help them co-operate with their parent or gaurdian.

 

This srticle shows many wse tactics in controling your kids such as not pressuring them or totally isolating them.

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Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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Young women in binge-drinking epidemic (Vic)

Young women in binge-drinking epidemic (Vic) | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it
YOUNG women are giving the blokes a run for their money in the race to get drunk - and putting themselves at severe risk.

Via ReGenUC
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

The young women are drinking alot more than what they used to. They are now drinking almost the same amount as men. The alcoholl related incidents that the ambulance as had to make for women have almost doubled since 2002.

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Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Breast Cancer News
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Australia ranks high in breast cancer survival

Australia ranks high in breast cancer survival | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it
Australian women with breast cancer are more likely to be alive three years after diagnosis than women in a range of other high-income countries, a large population-based study shows.

Via Susan Zager
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

This article shows that Australia has one of the highest rates of survivng breast cancer. The statistics show found overall three-year survival was highest in Australia (92%) which is great news for current breat cancer patients.

more...
Aaron Porteous's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:13 PM

Australia is pretty awesome.

Jeremy E Harrison's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:29 PM

This gives hope for women who develop breast cancer in their lives becuase of Australia's greater chance of survival for women with breast cancer.

Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Amazing Science
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Smog blamed as 8-year-old girl becomes youngest lung cancer patient

Smog blamed as 8-year-old girl becomes youngest lung cancer patient | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it

An eight-year-old Chinese girl has become the mainland's youngest lung cancer patient, with her illness blamed directly on environment factors.

 

The girl from Jiangsu lived by a busy road where she inhaled all kinds of dust and particles, China News Service cited Dr Feng Dongjie of Jiangsu Cancer Hospital as saying. These included superfine PM2.5 particles, less than 2.5 microns wide, that are considered the most dangerous component of smog, Feng said.

 

The country's breakneck urbanisation and industrialisation has created some of the world's worst urban pollution, which is blamed for soaring rates of cancer and respiratory diseases.

 

In Beijing, which has suffered frequent, severe smog in recent years, deaths from lung cancer rose by 56 per cent from 2001 to 2010. A fifth of all cancer patients suffer lung cancer, figures from the Beijing Health Bureau show. It became the leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the capital and the second-biggest among women, after breast cancer, in 2010.

 

The World Health Organisation's "2010 Global Burden of Disease" study found that air pollution accounted for 1.2 million premature deaths worldwide in 2010, including 140,000 deaths from lung cancer.

 

Last month the WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer said that air pollution from traffic and industrial fumes caused lung cancer and was also linked to bladder cancer.

 

Air pollution, mostly caused by transport, power generation, industrial or agricultural emissions and residential heating and cooking, was found to pose similar health risks to breathing in second-hand tobacco smoke.

 

The WHO said that in 2010, 223,000 people died from lung cancer worldwide resulting from air pollution.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

An eight year old girl becomes china's youngest lung cancer patient .Lung cancer is the most common cancer in Asia, Dr Hao Xishan, a noted oncologist. this is because of the pollution which is produced by thetransport, power generation, industrial or agricultural emissions and residential heating and cooking.


This is a deadly result as this could happen to anyone who lives in a heavy polluted region.

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Christian Troiani's curator insight, November 10, 2013 1:40 AM

This article is based on lung cancer being mainly caused by air pollution from traffic and industry. It conveys this message effectively by stating at the beginning of the article that an eight year old girl is the youngest patient with lung cancer. The article suggests the girl contracted the disease because she lived on a busy road where she inhaled various dangerous pollutants. It goes on to emphasise its point by stating various alarming statistics based on traffic and industrial air pollutants being responsible for lung cancer. The World Health Organisation found that air pollutants accounted for 1.2 million premature deaths in 2010 worldwide which included 140,000 lung cancer deaths. A noted oncologist states that lung cancer is the  most common cause of cancer in Asia followed by stomach and liver cancer. This article is blaming air pollution for various cancers, especially lung cancer.

Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from The Healthy & Green Consumer
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Blocking Sugar Intake can Reduce Cancer Risk and Progression (sugar-free for long life")

Blocking Sugar Intake can Reduce Cancer Risk and Progression (sugar-free for long life") | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it
Sugar fuels cancer. A new study has indicated that blocking dietary sugar can reduce tumor development risk and progression of cancer cells.

For the study, Dr. Cagan and his team engineered fruit flies to express Ras and Src, two important oncogenes, resulting in the development of small head tumors. After feeding the flies a high-sugar diet promoting insulin resistance, they found that high dietary sugar acts together with Ras and Src to increase insulin sensitivity specifically in tumor cells. As MedicalNewsToday reports, “By ramping up signaling of an important pathway called Wingless/Wnt, they increased tumor cells’ insulin receptors to further promote insulin sensitivity. This cascade of activity changed these small, weak tumors and caused them to begin growing aggressively”.

Using these newly identified drug targets (glucose, the RAs/Src oncogenes, and Wingless/Wnt signaling), the researchers identified compounds that could block the process. Using three different drug treatments, the team attacked the three different targets. Together, they “substantially reduced tumor size and progression.” ...

Obesity and type 2 diabetes are preventable lifestyle diseases. These are conditions we control. And if they are creating an environment that fosters prolific tumor growth, we can use that knowledge to combat both cancer and the metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cancer.


Via Bert Guevara
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

dr wattburg said that if you dont eat sugar you can starve the cancer tumors which stops the spreading.

blocking dietary sugar can reduce tumor development risk and progression of cancer cells.

Research has linked metabolic diseases like obesity and diabetes to an increased risk of pancreatic, liver, breast, and colon cancers.



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Paige Gervaise's curator insight, November 4, 2013 6:23 PM

sugar takes a large roll in lifestyle diseases. It can cause various different problems throughout your life

mikhail's curator insight, November 14, 2013 5:08 AM

cancer is a lifestyle disease. this article talks about how A new study has indicated that blocking dietary sugar can reduce tumor development risk and progression of cancer cells. cancer is really dangerous and life threatening. we must do all that we can to help or reduce the effects of cacner

 

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The Kids Are Not Alright

The Kids Are Not Alright | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it

-Kids are increasingly self-medicating to deal with the pressure. Forty percent of high-school students report using marijuana (up from 31 percent in 1991). In college, 40% percent of kids under age 21 report “binge drinking”—having five or more drinks on one occasion—in the last month.

-Kids also take prescription medications to cope. I can’t find official figures, but consensus among college administrators, who get counts from their health centers, is that at least a quarter of students are taking prescription drugs for depression and anxiety.

-Thirteen to 24 percent of high school students cut or injure themselves deliberately. Self-injury is a distressingly common way for kids to express emotional pain and relieve stress and anxiety.

-A quarter of college-age women binge-and-purge to “control their weight” (binge eating and then vomiting is a sign of the eating disorder bulimia). Anorexia is the third most common chronic illness among adolescents, and eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.

-Kids are increasingly depressed, perfectionistic, and committing suicide. A nationwide survey of college students at two- and four-year institutions found that nearly 30 percent of college students felt “so depressed that it was difficult to function” at some time in the past year.” About 10 percent of college students have thought seriously about committing suicide or have made a plan to do so.


When we pressure children to achieve, we cut them off from their sources of inspiration, their passions, and their natural curiosity. They don’t grow up to love learning but instead are schooled in how to game tests and make the grade. This does not make their lives meaningful, or happy.

[click on the title for the full article]  


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

This article is abuot kids that are seriously depressed. This shows that kids are so depressed that thirty percent oif college kids were so depressed they were unable to function properly. Some students have unfortunatley are commiting suicide.

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Jessica Byrd's comment, April 11, 12:50 PM
Mental disorders can have a very negative effect on kids now a days that put them in a lot of danger. According to the new statistics it is now more common for kids between the age of 15 to 18 (high school) to use marijuana. in theb past decade the percentage of use has gone up 10% to 40%. 40% is also the percentage of reported kids, under 21, that say they have binge drank (at least 5 or more) in the past month, of this study. Kids are more likely to get their hands on perscription medication to help them cope. 13 to 24% of kids participate in self-harm. Anorexia and bine-and-purge eating has become something very common in women to control their weight.
Rescooped by Nicholas Grozdanov from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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Binge drinkers face liver transplants WA

Binge drinkers face liver transplants WA | Nicholas G, Year 9 journal | Scoop.it
WA's top liver doctors are warning of a looming disaster from the State's binge-drinking culture, as more people face the prospect of premature liver damage and the need for a transplant.

Via Lives Lived Well, ReGenUC
Nicholas Grozdanov's insight:

Alcohol severely damages your liver causing fatty liver disease which increases the chance of obesity. People as young as thirty were needing liver transplants and inflamation to the liver was starting as young as twenty.

 

The doctor said ,any of the patients did not know that alcohol could do so much damage. 

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stephanie shalala's curator insight, May 19, 2013 1:21 AM

This article is about teenagers who are not aware of the long term effects of alcohol. These effects can lead to liver diseases which can lead to fatty liver, hepatitis and cirrhosis. I find this rather concerning as Professor Luc Delriviere, surgical director of the Liver Foundation said he was concerned about findings from a study that showed Perth had some of the nation's highest alcohol consumption he said more needed to be done to reduce alcohol abuse in young people and alert them to the dangers of heavy drinking, through schools and the wider community. I think this article is very good to keep teenagers aware of what long term effects of binge drinking can do to your health.