NHD: Turning Points in History~Art
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Source #4:

Wanczura, Dieter. "Edutainment: Abstract Art." Abstract Art. Artelino, 2013. Web. 08 Jan. 2013. <http://www.artelino.com/articles/abstract_art.asp>;

Karly Bornstein's insight:

"World War II and Hitler's persecution of the Jewish people and the condemnation of modern art by the Nazis, led to a wave of immigration of European avant-garde artists to the United States - mainly to New York.

The result was an enormous impact on contemporary American artists. The art movement called Abstract Expressionism was born."

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Source #2:

Westfall, Stephen. “The Abstract Tradition.” American Abstract Artists’ 60th Anniversary Print Portfolio, 1997.

Karly Bornstein's insight:

"Much art of the American colonial period consisted of portraits, as settlers sought to establish their identities in a new world....Whether phrased in the representational idiom of George Bellows and Edward Hopper, or in the language of pure abstraction, these disturbing works seem a far cry from the idyllic aspirations of early nineteenth-century Americans, who—for a brief time—truly believed their country held the promise of paradise."

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Source #3:

Source #3: | NHD: Turning Points in History~Art | Scoop.it
Karly Bornstein's insight:

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/davis/ ;

 

This painting is abstract. It was painted by Stuart Davis and it's called Egg Beater No. 4. 

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Source #1:

Drutt, Matthew. "Abstractionin the 20th Century." Abstraction In The Twentieth Century-Total Risk Freedom Discipline-Matthew Drutt-Essay. N.p., 2012. Web. 07 Jan. 2013. <http://www.newyorkartworld.com/reviews-nyaw/abstraction20cent.html>.

Karly Bornstein's insight:

"It was not until the pioneering work of Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, and Mondrian in the early to mid-1910s that painting became truly abstract or non-objective, with the advent of compositions that are almost entirely self-referential. Although they worked independently from one another, these artists were united by a belief that abstract art was capable of evoking a spiritual experience." 

 

This helps me see that my turning point definitely started in the early 1900s and continued on throughout that century. Abstract art seemed to be not just a small event happening, it spread all over and inspired many people.

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