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Assessment and Rubrics

Assessment and Rubrics | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
A collection of rubrics for assessing portfolios, cooperative learning, research process/report, PowerPoint, oral presentation, web page, blog, wiki, and other social media projects.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Diane Johnson's insight:

This site contains a range of samples for a variety of projects. As usual, you will want to be a wise consumer, but many will provide a nice start.

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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, February 15, 2:45 PM

Good rubric for discussion boards included. 

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NASA says ‘Megadrought’ likely for western U.S. by end of century

NASA says ‘Megadrought’ likely for western U.S. by end of century | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The consequences of climate change paint a bleak picture for the Southwest and much of America’s breadbasket, the Great Plains. A “megadrought” likely will occur late in this century, and […]
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Images of Human/Environmental Interactions

Images of Human/Environmental Interactions | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The blizzard of 2015 blasted the region with wind-whipped snow that piled nearly 3-feet high in some places.

 

As of 1 p.m. Monday, Boston set a new record for snowiest seven-day period in the city's history with 34.2 inches.


Via Seth Dixon
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Karly Shelton's curator insight, February 8, 5:08 PM

This collection of images shows a wide array of people's reactions to the recent blizzard. It is also interesting to note just how dramaticially a persons environment can change within a few hours. 

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 21, 6:39 PM

Human/Environment Interaction is one of the principles of Geography. Weather is about the simplest form of Human/Environment action there is. Weather and climate effect humans in may ways. Both of these have direct impact on agriculture and because of this the rise of civilization in the fertile crescent. But weather doesn't just dictate the rise of agriculture and civilization it effects us everyday. The picture shows Boston covered in record breaking snow fall. This altered many peoples schedules, closed businesses, canceled sporting events, forced people to spend time shoveling snow, gave work for snow plowers, and all in all effected the entirety of Boston.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 22, 6:28 PM

Human/Environment interaction is important to study because we must know how our actions affect the environment which in turn affect us. The blizzard in Boston changed the peoples ability to attend certain events and altered the way the acted. They could not drive, and could not commute long distances because of the snow. This belongs under the category of major geographical concepts underlying the geographical perspective, because Human/Environment interaction is a major geographical concept.

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Mapping the World's Problems

Mapping the World's Problems | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Google Earth Engine works with scientists by using satellite imagery to provide data visualizations for environmental and health issues.

Via Seth Dixon
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Todd Hallsten's comment, February 13, 10:39 PM
I like the idea of this map because it allows for the comparison of logged forest to preserved forest. Allowing for facts not rumored amount of trees producing air, i would really like to see a map of alaska..
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 16, 12:23 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Several Studies Show, U.S. Drought Will Be the Worst in 1,000 Years

Several Studies Show, U.S. Drought Will Be the Worst in 1,000 Years | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

Several independent studies in recent years have predicted that the American Southwest and central Great Plains will experience extensive droughts in the second half of this century, and that advancing climate change will exacerbate those droughts. But a new analysis released today says the drying will be even more extreme than previously predicted—the worst in nearly 1,000 years. Some time between 2050 and 2100, extended drought conditions in both regions will become more severe than the megadroughts of the 12th and 13th centuries. Tree rings and other evidence indicate that those medieval dry periods exceeded anything seen since, across the land we know today as the continental U.S.


The analysis “shows how exceptional future droughts will be,” says Benjamin Cook, a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City and lead author of the study. The work was published online today in the inaugural edition of Science Advances and was released simultaneously at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting here.


Cook and his colleagues reached their conclusion by comparing 17 different computer projections of 21st century climate with drought records of the past millennium, notably data in the North American Drought Atlas. (The atlas is based on extensive tree-ring studies conducted by Cook’s father, Edward, a researcher at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.) The models consistently demonstrated drought worse than at any time during that epoch, and worse than thecurrent drought out West, which has prevailed for 11 of the previous 14 years, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. In 2014 the drought cost California more than $2 billion in agricultural loses alone, according to the University of California, Davis.


The models also revealed that the drying in the Southwest would result from a combination of less rain and greater soil evaporation due to higher temperatures. They were not as conclusive about less rain in the central Great Plains but all showed more evaporation there. “Even where rain may not change much, greater evaporation will dry out the soils,” Cook says.

 
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dr. Gretchen Richards's curator insight, February 16, 3:33 PM

What contingency plans do you have in place for your home? office? community? school? church? medical and hospital facilities? Have you considered how you would like without access to water on a daily basis?

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Biomass plus carbon capture yields negative-emission energy

Biomass plus carbon capture yields negative-emission energy | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
As we saw in yesterday's National Academies of Science (NAS) report, carbon capture and storage may not be ready for prime time, but the process is clearly worth considering whether it should be developed, both technologically and economically.
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Share Your Thoughts on the Next Generation Science Standards

Share Your Thoughts on the Next Generation Science Standards | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
NSTA is seeking widespread input from science educators on resources, professional development, and support that will be needed for successful implementation of the NGSS. We've already heard from h...
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Next Generation Science Standards: What’s different, and do they matter? : StemTeachingTools

Next Generation Science Standards: What’s different, and do they matter? : StemTeachingTools | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Next Generation Science Standards: What’s different, and do they matter? http://t.co/GhnUf6OlQ1 via @STEMTeachTools
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Useful briefs about NGSS

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Next Generation Science Standards - Implementing Goals For 2020 And Beyond - Science 2.0

Science 2.0 Next Generation Science Standards - Implementing Goals For 2020 And Beyond Science 2.0 Curriculum resources: Because full sequences of curriculum materials designed explicitly for NGSS have not yet been developed, states, districts, and...
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Formative Assessment Is Transformational!

Formative Assessment Is Transformational! | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
I think formative assessment is one of the single most important things that teachers can do -- and already do -- for their students. In fact, great teachers use formative assessment whether or not they know it.
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Guide to Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards

Guide to Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
A Framework for K-12 Science Education and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) describe a new vision for science learning and teaching that is catalyzing improvements in science classrooms across the United States.
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Blast Off: The Next Generation Science Standards | Scholastic.com

Blast Off: The Next Generation Science Standards  | Scholastic.com | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
What the Next Generation Science Standards mean for your classroom.
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Free Explain Everything Lesson Ideas For Your Classroom

Free Explain Everything Lesson Ideas For Your Classroom | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Free Explain Everything Lesson Ideas For Your Classroom
by TeachThought Staff
If you use Explain Everything–or you don’t but perhaps should give it a look–there’s a free iBook of lesson ideas that you might appreciate.
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Webinar: Literacy for the Science Classroom—Think, Read, Talk, and Write Like a Scientist — WestEd

Webinar: Literacy for the Science Classroom—Think, Read, Talk, and Write Like a Scientist — WestEd | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Interested in learning more about the Next Generation Science Standards? Wednesday, February 25, WestEd will host... http://t.co/6EKszuoieh
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How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 11:53 AM

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, February 7, 11:56 PM

AMAZING!

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Humans toss 8 million metric tons of plastic into the ocean pro year, study shows

Humans toss 8 million metric tons of plastic into the ocean pro year, study shows | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

Scientists for decades have been worried about plastic clogging up our oceans, but now they finally know just how bad the problem is. We dump about five shopping bags full of plastic for every foot of coastline in the world every year, according to a new study. The numbers are orders of magnitude higher than prior estimates.


If we continue to produce large amounts of plastic—and can’t find a better way to dispose of them—the amount of plastic in our oceans will double over the next decade, according to Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineer at the University of Georgia and lead author on the study.

 

She says these numbers actually undercount the problem because they account for only floating plastic. As much as 50 percent of the plastic produced in North America probably sinks to the ocean floor, she says.

The 8 million metric tons of plastic that litters our oceans every year consists of not only the usual suspects (like six-pack plastic rings, which are the bane of sea turtles), but also microplastics, tiny bits of debris smaller than your fingernail. Microplastics endanger marine life of all sizes, from whales to barnacles, as they are easy to swallow and may contain dangerous chemicals.

 

Jambeck and her team noticed at least one recurring theme within the data. Middle-income countries, especially those that have begun to industrialize but have not yet figured out how to manage their waste, end up tossing a lot of garbage in their oceans. One outlier is the United States, a rich country that would seem to have its waste management act together but still dumps a lot of plastic into the oceans.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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In a first, astronomers catch a multiple star system in the process of forming

In a first, astronomers catch a multiple star system in the process of forming | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

An international team of astronomers reports the first multiple-star system to be observed during the earliest stage of formation. This finding supports model predictions about how two- and three-star systems form. Astronomers say understanding why and how multiple star systems form is essential for grasping phenomena such as star and planet formation, planet frequency and habitability.

 

Writing in the current issue of Nature, first author Jaime Pineda of the Institute for Astronomy at ETH Zurich, with others in England and the United States, say understanding why and how multiple star systems form is essential for grasping phenomena such as star and planet formation, planet frequency and habitability. They say the number of stars in a system is determined during the earliest stage of star formation but critical processes occurring then are usually hidden by dense clouds of dust and gas.


Offner says the new observations also help to explain why some pre-stellar gas condensationsgo on to form a system with only a single star like ours, while others form binary (two stars) or multi-star systems. Up to half of all stars reside in systems with two or more stars, including the sun's nearest stellar neighbor, Alpha Centauri. However,astronomers do not know exactly what determines how many stars will form together or what initial conditions determine the type of star system to develop. Results they report this week advance understanding of these conditions in situations where multiple stars are very widely separated.


Offner, who performs simulations on stars' natal environments, had predicted that stars in many forming multi-star systems will be widely separated by a distance of several thousand times the distance between Earth and our sun. Conditions in this initial configuration in a "stellar nursery" are governed by gas velocities and gravity, she notes.


"It seems like a simple question," she says. "Why is our sun a single star while the nearest star to us, Alpha Centauri, happens to be a triple system? There are competing models for how multiple star systems are born, but now we know a little more than we did before."


In their new paper, Pineda and colleagues report discovering the star system in the act of forming within the "stellar nursery" region of the constellation Perseus by following up on intriguing observations made by the Very Large Array (VLA), an astronomical radio observatory in Socorro, N.M., and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope, in West Virginia.


The new, high-resolution observations show threegas condensations, which are fragments of a dense gas filament, and one very young star that is still gaining mass. They estimate the condensations will each form a star in about 40,000 years, a relatively short timescale in astronomical terms. The filament fragmentation "provides a new pathway to create stellar systems," Pineda and colleagues note. "This is the first time that we have been able to study these young systems in formation, and it is thanks to the combination of both GBT and VLA that we can do it," Pineda adds.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Steve Mattison's curator insight, February 12, 1:19 PM

Aren't they amazing?

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Earth's surprise inside: Geologists unlock mysteries of the planet's inner core | News Bureau | University of Illinois

Earth's surprise inside: Geologists unlock mysteries of the planet's inner core | News Bureau | University of Illinois | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
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Nice example of revising a model in light of new evidence.

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Learn About Argumentation With NSTA Press Author Victor Sampson

Learn About Argumentation With NSTA Press Author Victor Sampson | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Join NSTA Press author Victor Sampson in Orlando for workshops about scientific argumentation. 
Scientific Argumentation in Biology
Attendees will receive a copy of the book Scientific Argumentation in Biology.
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Really useful books for high school implementation of many life science topics and some of the chemistry topics. Opportunity to learn from the author.

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Using Physical Science Gadgets and Gizmos in Elementary Grades

Using Physical Science Gadgets and Gizmos in Elementary Grades | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The authors of the popular Phenomenon-Based Learning series have released a new book geared toward elementary-age students.
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These make nice 'hooks' for lessons.

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6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning

6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning by TeachThought Staff If curriculum is the what of teaching, and learning models are the how, assessment is the puzzled “Hmmmm”–as in, I assumed this and this about student learning, but after giving this...
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NGSS Hub

NGSS Hub | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The NSTA Next Generation Science Standards Hub offers information, resources, news, professional learning opportunities, and expert advice in understanding and implementing the Next Generation Science Standards - NGSS...
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Science to look forward to in 2015

Science to look forward to in 2015 | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
It’s a new year, but it’s not just any new year. 2015 is shaping up to be a huge year for scientific exploration and discovery plus science policy.
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5 Steps to Atomic Learning Training that Meets Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) | Atomic Learning Blogs

5 Steps to Atomic Learning Training that Meets Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) | Atomic Learning Blogs | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Atomic Learning recently updated their search by standards feature to include the ability to search for content that meets Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
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