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Newsela: A Resource for Informational Text

Newsela: A Resource for Informational Text | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Unlimited access to hundreds of leveled news articles and Common Core–aligned quizzes, with new articles every day.

Via Deb Gardner
Diane Johnson's insight:

Nice source of leveled reads on a range of topics in all subject matters.

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Lisa Burkhalter's curator insight, February 7, 10:50 AM

Great resource for informational text, formative assessment, and differentiation.

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The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching

The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching [Graphic]
by TeachThought Staff
“Sticky Teaching”–interesting idea.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Using strategies based on how the brain works.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

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Homepage : StemTeachingTools

Homepage : StemTeachingTools | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Diane Johnson's insight:

Contains useful design briefs that help design instruction and curricula aligned to NGSS.

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Time to Debunk Those PBL Myths

Time to Debunk Those PBL Myths | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
It's time to tackle myths like project-based learning is mostly fluff and not academically rigorous. See other PBL misnomers and read how they deserve myth-busting.
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Next Generation Science Standards Webinar - Measured Progress

Next Generation Science Standards Webinar - Measured Progress | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
STEM is flowering; Next Generation Science Standards #NGSS provide fertile ground. View the webinar http://t.co/oXStEe7TNF
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50 Resources For Teaching With iPads

50 Resources For Teaching With iPads | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST
A Collection Of The Best Resources For Teaching With The iPad
by TeachThought Staff
So we thought we’d start an ongoing collection–that is, one that is updated to reflect trends and changes–of the best resources for teaching with the iPad.
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Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems

Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

"An animated map of global wind and weather. Join the Facebook community.  Seen here are the dual menaces, Cyclone Hudhud and Typhoon Vongfong (as seen from ISS)."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 2:18 PM

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  This visualization of global weather conditions is updated every three hours from supercomputer data projections.  Click on the 'earth' text in the lower left-hand corner to customize the display.  For examining the wind patterns and oceans currents, this is much more useful than Google Earth; this is definitely one of my favorite resources.


Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Pam Anderson's curator insight, October 12, 11:48 AM

this might interest some of our teachers who are studying weather With their students.  I just think this site is fascinating!

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If we want our children to have a healthy future, we have to fight global warming.

If we want our children to have a healthy future, we have to fight global warming. | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Scientists say that climate change is happening right now. We see it in the brutal heat, drought, wildfires, and storms afflicting much of the United States. And carbon pollution is also contributing to unprecedented levels of childhood asthma.
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How To Burn Yourself Out As A Teacher

How To Burn Yourself Out As A Teacher | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST How To Burn Yourself Out As A Teacher by TeachThought Staff We published a post last year titled, “Why Good Teachers Quit.” Nearly 70,000+ social shares–and scores of comments–later, and it’s pretty clear that this idea (captured so well by...
Diane Johnson's insight:

With all the initiatives and changes in standards, this post is very timely.

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Viewpoints: It takes more than gadgets for girls to get interested in science ... - Sacramento Bee

Viewpoints: It takes more than gadgets for girls to get interested in science ... - Sacramento Bee | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
We must start early in the education process, believing that women can be successful in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
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Teaching Writing With Technology? Blogging, Blogging, Blogging

Teaching Writing With Technology? Blogging, Blogging, Blogging | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST Teaching Writing With Technology? Blogging Continues To Make Sense
by Tracy Collins, Central Michigan University
Helping students to cultivate the skills needed for writing is often about cultivating a love of writing.
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The next generation science standards meet nanopore sequencing - ScienceBlogs (blog)

The next generation science standards meet nanopore sequencing - ScienceBlogs (blog) | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Scale, proportion, and quantity belong to one of the cross cutting concepts in the next generation science standards (NGSS).
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Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving

Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
By teaching students to "drive their own brain" through metacognition, we provide a concrete way to guide them think about how they can best learn.
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A Guide For Teaching With Analogies

A Guide For Teaching With Analogies | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST A Guide For Teaching With Analogies
by Terry Heick
Analogies are one of the best kept secrets in education.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Nice post and useful for thinking about helping students develop and critique models.

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Map Skills for Elementary Students

Map Skills for Elementary Students | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Find activities that develop map skills in students from preK to Grade 6.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Many of the elementary Earth Science standards incorporate mapping skills. These are some really useful resources to help address those standards.

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The Science of Fear

The Science of Fear | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The amygdala is your brain's 911 operator, triggering a hardwired reaction to danger. Fear is fun to learn about, but fear itself can hinder learning!
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Maintaining Your Sanity In The Pressure Game Of Teaching

Maintaining Your Sanity In The Pressure Game Of Teaching | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST Maintaining Your Sanity In The Pressure Game Of Teaching
by Kay Bisaillon 
Editor’s Note: You may have noticed we’ve taken a slightly different approach to connected educator’s month.
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GoSoapBox: Hear What Your Students are Thinking

GoSoapBox: Hear What Your Students are Thinking | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
GoSoapBox is a web-based clicker tool used by educators around the world to keep students engaged and gain real-time insight into student comprehension.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Oceans experiencing largest sea level rise in 6,000 years, study says

Oceans experiencing largest sea level rise in 6,000 years, study says | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

There are two main forces that can drive sea levels higher. One is something called thermal expansion, which involves the expansion of ocean water as it warms. The other is an influx of additional water, ushered into the sea by melting ice sheets and glaciers. Scientists have long concluded that sea levels are rising. Just look at Miami. Or the Maldives. They’ve also discerned that major ice sheets are melting at a faster clip than previously understood.

 

What has been less clear, however, is whether the development is recent or not. Over the last several thousands of years, has the ocean risen and fallen and risen again? A new study, just published in PNAS, suggests that the ocean has been surprisingly static since 4,000 B.C..

 

But that changed 150 years ago. Reconstructing 35,000 years of sea fluctuations, the study, which researchers say is the most comprehensive of its kind, found that the oceans are experiencing greater sea rise than at any time over the last 6,000 years. “What we see in the tide gauges, we don’t see in the past record, so there’s something going on today that’s wasn’t going on before,” lead author Kurt Lambeck, a professor at Australian National University, told the Australia Broadcasting Corporation. “I think that is clearly the impact of rising temperatures.”

 

How much has the sea risen over the past century and a half? A lot. And it’s surging faster than ever. “There is robust evidence that sea levels have risen as a result of climate change,” Australian government research has found. “Over the last century, global average sea level rose by 1.7 mm [0.067 inches] per year, in recent years (between 1993 and 2010), this rate has increased to 3.2 mm [0.126 inches] per year.” In all, the sea has risen roughly 20 centimeters since the start of the 20th century. “The rate of sea level rise over the last century is unusually high in the context of the last 2,000 years,” the Australian report added.


But it’s not just the last 2,000 years. It’s the last 6,000 years, according to this recent study. And now, the rising sea levels over the last 100 years, is “beyond dispute,” Lambeck explained.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NERONYC's curator insight, October 19, 6:04 PM

Preserve our invironment

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ED12A-08. Using Next Generation Science Standards to Strengthen Existing Climate Curriculum Modules - AGU Virtual Options 2014

#iteachphysics Using Next Generation Science Standards to Strengthen Existing Climate Curriculum Modules http://t.co/CZyGLSOqSB via @theagu
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The next generation science standards meet nanopore sequencing

The next generation science standards meet nanopore sequencing | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Scale, proportion, and quantity belong to one of the cross cutting concepts in the next generation science standards (NGSS).
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What I Learned By Doing What I Ask Students To Do

What I Learned By Doing What I Ask Students To Do | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST Teachers Shadowing Students: What I Learned By Doing What I Ask Students To Do
by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education
The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building.
Diane Johnson's insight:

I have done this as well, and it's truly a game changing experience!

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WHO: What we know about transmission of the Ebola virus among humans

WHO: What we know about transmission of the Ebola virus among humans | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Ebola virus disease is not an airborne infection. Airborne spread among humans implies inhalation of an infectious dose of virus from a suspended cloud of small dried droplets.

This mode of transmission has not been observed during extensive studies of the Ebola virus over several decades.

Common sense and observation tell us that spread of the virus via coughing or sneezing is rare, if it happens at all. Epidemiological data emerging from the outbreak are not consistent with the pattern of spread seen with airborne viruses, like those that cause measles and chickenpox, or the airborne bacterium that causes tuberculosis.

Theoretically, wet and bigger droplets from a heavily infected individual, who has respiratory symptoms caused by other conditions or who vomits violently, could transmit the virus – over a short distance – to another nearby person.

This could happen when virus-laden heavy droplets are directly propelled, by coughing or sneezing (which does not mean airborne transmission) onto the mucus membranes or skin with cuts or abrasions of another person.

WHO is not aware of any studies that actually document this mode of transmission. On the contrary, good quality studies from previous Ebola outbreaks show that all cases were infected by direct close contact with symptomatic patients.

 

The Ebola virus is transmitted among humans through close and direct physical contact with infected bodily fluids, the most infectious being blood, feces and vomit.


The Ebola virus has also been detected in breast milk, urine and semen. In a convalescent male, the virus can persist in semen for at least 70 days; one study suggests persistence for more than 90 days.


Saliva and tears may also carry some risk. However, the studies implicating these additional bodily fluids were extremely limited in sample size and the science is inconclusive. In studies of saliva, the virus was found most frequently in patients at a severe stage of illness. The whole live virus has never been isolated from sweat.


The Ebola virus can also be transmitted indirectly, by contact with previously contaminated surfaces and objects. The risk of transmission from these surfaces is low and can be reduced even further by appropriate cleaning and disinfection procedures.


Ebola situation assessmentsFrequently asked questions on Ebola virus diseaseFact sheet on EbolaEbola virus disease - web site
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, October 10, 2:39 AM

These are some really good facts about the current Ebola outbreak.

 

Local authorities in affected countries are making creative use of ICT to help fight Ebola http://sco.lt/5OkxUn

 

More scoops on Ebola can be read here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Ebola

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46 Tools to Make Infographics in the Classroom

46 Tools to Make Infographics in the Classroom | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Great list of tools for the classroom. One addition I’d recommend is http://youzign.com, which is an online piece of graphics software that can be used to create infographics.
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"Deeper Learning" Improves Student Outcomes. But What Is It? - Huffington Post

"Deeper Learning" Improves Student Outcomes. But What Is It? - Huffington Post | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The pressure is on teachers this year. Students are preparing to be tested on the new, tougher Common Core State Standards in over 40 states where, in many cases, teachers will be evaluated on the outcome.
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