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Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today

Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
A conversation with David Thornburg about designing a better classroom

Via Nancy Jones
Diane Johnson's insight:

Interesting considerations for reimagining school.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:43 PM

School has not been a happy place for many of us. We need real conversations rather than a continuation of the same old same old.

Tom Hood's curator insight, November 17, 2013 8:34 AM

It is really about learner engagement.

 

Exactly why we have added new particpation techniques and tools like Insights to Go, Conferences.io, ThinkTank, #MBSN (Management By Sticky Notes and more to our professional development programming. 

 

See our release about a New Era in Talent Development and Learning http://cpa.tc/32f

Agron S. Dida's comment, November 20, 2013 8:47 AM
Diane, thank you for great article. I just changed the cover picture and re-Scooped it.
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10 Emaciated Terms That Keep Education In A Box

10 Emaciated Terms That Keep Education In A Box | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST 10 Emaciated Terms That Keep Education In A Box by Thom Markham Albert Einstein nailed it–“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” That truth will decide whether we develop a 21st-century friendly...
Diane Johnson's insight:

NGSS moves beyond these terms and concentrates on developing a storyline for learning.

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Students Map Real-World Issues with (Free) Geospatial Tools

Students Map Real-World Issues with (Free) Geospatial Tools | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Schools are gaining access to the high-powered geographical information system software that enables detailed mapping and analysis of data. Learn how they are using it to teach students.
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Google takes on the human body to find out what a healthy person looks like

Google takes on the human body to find out what a healthy person looks like | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Google is joining the quest to map the human body, except it's not just tackling one part of the body, its going whole hog to find answers to questions scientists still have about the way the body ...

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 25, 10:27 AM

Google is joining the quest to map the human body, except it's not just tackling one part of the body, its going whole hog to find answers to questions scientists still have about the way the body ...

Deborah Verran's comment, July 26, 10:34 AM
Intriguing that Google has not forged links with some of the medical researchers and public health organizations who between them have a fair amount o accumulated knowledge on this topic. Watch this with interest!
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What Resources Does the National Science Teachers Association Offer Around Elementary Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)?

What Resources Does the National Science Teachers Association Offer Around Elementary Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)? | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
What Resources Does the National Science Teachers Association Offer Around Elementary Education and the NGSS? http://t.co/DosYcV9cWX
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The Changing Role Of The Teacher

The Changing Role Of The Teacher | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST The Changing Role Of The Teacher
by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education
Ed note: This post was excerpted and mildly edited from a longer post from Grant on self-sustained learning.
What does it mean to “teach”?
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Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights

Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Will Pemble became CoasterDad when his son's backyard roller coaster idea turned into a massive PBL project integrating math, physics, and 21st century skills.
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Next Steps for the Next Generation Science Standards

Next Steps for the Next Generation Science Standards | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
States that adopt the Next Generation Science Standards must declare a moratorium on high-stakes science testing, Arthur Camins writes.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Excellent, practical, and realistic advice for implementing the NGSS so that there is a real impact on student learning.

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Study shows how effects of starvation can be passed to future generations

Study shows how effects of starvation can be passed to future generations | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

Evidence from human famines and animal studies suggests that starvation can affect the health of descendants of famished individuals. But how such an acquired trait might be transmitted from one generation to the next has not been clear. A new study, involving roundworms, shows that starvation induces specific changes in so-called small RNAs and that these changes are inherited through at least three consecutive generations, apparently without any DNA involvement. The study, conducted by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers, offers intriguing new evidence that the biology of inheritance is more complicated than previously thought. The study was published in the July 10, 2014 edition of the journal Cell.

The idea that acquired traits can be inherited dates back to Jean Baptiste Larmarck (1744–1829), who proposed that species evolve when individuals adapt to their environment and transmit the acquired traits to their offspring. According to Lamarckian inheritance, for example, giraffes developed elongated long necks as they stretched to feed on the leaves of high trees, an acquired advantage that was inherited by subsequent generations. In contrast, Charles Darwin (1809–82) later theorized that random mutations that offer an organism a competitive advantage drive a species' evolution. In the case of the giraffe, individuals that happened to have slightly longer necks had a better chance of securing food and thus were able to have more offspring. The subsequent discovery of hereditary genetics supported Darwin's theory, and Lamarck's ideas faded into obscurity.

 

"However, events like the Dutch famine of World War II have compelled scientists to take a fresh look at acquired inheritance," said study leader Oliver Hobert, PhD, professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at CUMC. Starving women who gave birth during the famine had children who were unusually susceptible to obesity and other metabolic disorders, as were their grandchildren. Controlled animal experiments have found similar results, including a study in rats demonstrating that chronic high-fat diets in fathers result in obesity in their female offspring.

 

In a 2011 study, Oded Rechavi, a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Hobert's laboratory, found that roundworms (C. elegans) that developed resistance to a virus were able to pass along that immunity to their progeny for many consecutive generations. The immunity was transferred in the form of small viral-silencing RNAs working independently of the organism's genome. Other studies have reported similar findings, but none of these addressed whether a biological response induced by natural circumstances, such as famine, could be passed on to subsequent generations.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Diane Johnson's insight:

Fascinating developments in understanding epigenetics

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Climate Change Science Poised to Enter Nation's Classrooms | InsideClimate News

Climate Change Science Poised to Enter Nation's Classrooms | InsideClimate News | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
New national science standards that make the teaching of global warming part of the public school curriculum are slated to be released this month, potentially ending an era in which climate skepticism has been allowed to seep into the nation's...
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Learning ability in math and reading are tightly linked and highly genetic, scientists say

Learning ability in math and reading are tightly linked and highly genetic, scientists say | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

Around half of the genes that influence how well a child can read also play a role in their mathematics ability, say scientists from UCL, the University of Oxford and King’s College London who led a study into the genetic basis of cognitive traits.


While mathematics and reading ability are known to run in families, the complex system of genes affecting these traits is largely unknown. The finding deepens scientists’ understanding of how nature and nurture interact, highlighting the important role that a child’s learning environment may have on the development of reading and mathematics skills, and the complex, shared genetic basis of these cognitive traits.

 

The collaborative study, published today in Nature Communications as part of the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium, used data from the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS) to analyse the influence of genetics on the reading and mathematics performance of 12-year-old children from nearly 2,800 British families.

 

Twins and unrelated children were tested for reading comprehension and fluency, and answered mathematics questions based on the UK national curriculum. The information collected from these tests was combined with DNA data, showing a substantial overlap in the genetic variants that influence mathematics and reading. 


Dr Chris Spencer (Oxford University), lead author said: “We’re moving into a world where analysing millions of DNA changes, in thousands of individuals, is a routine tool in helping scientists to understand aspects of human biology. This study used the technique to help investigate the overlap in the genetic component of reading and maths ability in children. Interestingly, the same method can be applied to pretty much any human trait, for example to identify new links between diseases and disorders, or the way in which people respond to treatments.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Diane Johnson's insight:

Really interesting - the more we know about our genetic underpinnings, the more we know there is to learn.

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Rick Frank's curator insight, July 14, 5:27 AM

I can hear the protesters screaming already :)

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New Jersey Adopts Common Science Standards

New Jersey Adopts Common Science Standards | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
On July 9, the New Jersey education department announced that the state board had adopted the common science standards, making it the 12th state to do so.
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Building Rigorous Projects That Are Core to Learning (Keys to PBL Series Part 2)

Project-based learning doesn't mean leaving standards behind. Follow these tips to plan projects that challenge your students and align with core learning goals.
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An Example Of Experiential Learning

An Example Of Experiential Learning | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST An Example Of Experiential Learning by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education I recently visited Thetford Academy in Vermont (one of the few and interestingpublic-private academies in New England) where they have a formal and explicit commitment...
Diane Johnson's insight:

Includes some simple but useful questions

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4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do

4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Transformational teachers create experiences in their classrooms, melding the art and science of any subject and making their students care about learning.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Just what NGSS is calling for!

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» Parent Q and A

» Parent Q and A | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

NiceRT @NSTA: Parent Q+A | Next Generation Science Standards: Fostering Science Learning to Last a Lifetime http://t.co/MVMHoggJYv #NSTA #scich…

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Nice article to share with parents as you begin to implement NGSS.

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What Does Science Literacy Mean in the Age of NGSS?

What Does Science Literacy Mean in the Age of NGSS? | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
How can you, and why you should, promote literacy in the science classroom.
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Home - Defined STEM

Home - Defined STEM | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Hundreds of performance tasks, literacy tasks, and constructed responses, all using real-world themes, videos, and simulations for UbD and LDC frameworks.
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6 Ideas For Students Graduating Into A New Economy

6 Ideas For Students Graduating Into A New Economy | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST 6 Ideas For Students Graduating Into A New Economy
by Dawn Casey-Rowe, Keeper of the Faith
“I hope you don’t expect to get a job that way!
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22 Of The Newest Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom

22 Of The Newest Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
TEST 22 Of The Best Apps To Make Videos In The Classroom
by TeachThought Staff
In education, perhaps one of the least utilized talents of iOS hardware is creating exceptional video.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Some neat apps that may prove to be useful for classroom projects.

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Resources | Next Generation Science Standards

Resources | Next Generation Science Standards | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

The NGSS Network States and Partners support the creation of resources to help educators and administrators as they plan and develop systems of implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.


Via Budd Turner
Diane Johnson's insight:

Stay tuned for lots of useful resources!

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Climate Change Bill of Rights launched | NCSE

Climate Change Bill of Rights launched | NCSE | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
MT @insideclimate: NCSE launches "Climate Science Students Bill of Rights" http://t.co/kub4Cbc88o Back story here: http://t.co/rFTaEo7kKx
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Next Generation: 5 Ways Science Classes Will Change

Next Generation: 5 Ways Science Classes Will Change | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
New standards will mean less memorization, more thinking in science class, say supporters. Even so, critics worry the standards for STEM classes will dumb down science education.
Diane Johnson's insight:

There is a need to continue the conversation about memorization vs. application. Sometimes I think it is more a matter of uncertainty with how to implement than with these differences.

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The Case for Next Generation Science Standards | Next Generation Science Standards

The Case for Next Generation Science Standards | Next Generation Science Standards | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
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Establishing Real-World Connections in Projects (Keys to PBL Series Part 1)

Students are more engaged when learning relates directly to the world they live in. See how to extend your projects beyond the classroom walls.
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Earth's magnetic field is weakening 10 times faster than originally predicted, swarm satellites show

Earth's magnetic field is weakening 10 times faster than originally predicted, swarm satellites show | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

Earth's magnetic field, which protects the planet from huge blasts of deadly solar radiation, has been weakening over the past six months, according to data collected by a European Space Agency (ESA) satellite array called Swarm.

 

The biggest weak spots in the magnetic field — which extends 370,000 miles (600,000 kilometers) above the planet's surface — have sprung up over the Western Hemisphere, while the field has strengthened over areas like the southern Indian Ocean, according to the magnetometers onboard the Swarm satellites — three separate satellites floating in tandem.

 

The scientists who conducted the study are still unsure why the magnetic field is weakening, but one likely reason is that Earth's magnetic poles are getting ready to flip, said Rune Floberghagen, the ESA's Swarm mission manager. In fact, the data suggest magnetic north is moving toward Siberia.

 

In fact over the past 20 million years, our planet has settled into a pattern of a pole reversal about every 200,000 to 300,000 years; as of 2012, however, it has been more than twice that long since the last reversal. These reversals aren't split-second flips, and instead occur over hundreds or thousands of years. During this lengthy stint, the magnetic poles start to wander away from the region around the spin poles (the axis around which our planet spins), and eventually end up switched around, according to Cornell University astronomers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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