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"Something Stinks!" Named an Outstanding Science Trade Book for 2014 - EIN News (press release)

"Something Stinks!" Named an Outstanding Science Trade Book for 2014 EIN News (press release) "Emily is a reluctant science student until her investigation introduces her to the science practices of persistence, skepticism, experimentation and...

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Digital Library for Earth System Education

Digital Library for Earth System Education | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
DLESE home page
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Great source of data, info, investigations, etc. for implementing ES standards.

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Boston’s leaky pipes add to greenhouse-gas buildup

Boston’s leaky pipes add to greenhouse-gas buildup | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Imagine if every time you filled your car with gas, a few gallons didn’t make it into the tank and instead spilled onto the ground. That’s essentially what happens every […]
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Using The Next Generation Science Standards for Students’ Deeper Understanding | Lostgrad

Using The Next Generation Science Standards for Students’ Deeper Understanding | Lostgrad | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Using The Next Generation Science Standards for Students’ Deeper Understanding http://t.co/9am7VMFs27 #learning #education #course
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Online course through Rice University

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Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards: Strategies for Educational Leaders

"Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards: Strategies for Educational Leaders" http://t.co/pDekTsdWOi
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Tasa Graphic Arts Releases Earth’s Rocks and the Rock Cycle app for iPad

Tasa Graphic Arts Releases Earth’s Rocks and the Rock Cycle app for iPad | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Tasa Graphic Arts, Inc. today introduces Earth's Rocks and the Rock Cycle, a new educational Earth Science app for iPad. Explore the three types of rock found on Earth and understand the geologic processes that create and transform them.

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The Next Generation Science Standards: A Transformational Opportunity

The Next Generation Science Standards: A Transformational Opportunity | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
RT @TdiShelton: Power of Collaboration! The Next Generation Science Standards: A Transformational Opportunity http://t.co/7NmaC1OYUs #satc…
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The Genius Hour Design Cycle: A Process For Planning

The Genius Hour Design Cycle: A Process For Planning | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The Genius Hour Design Cycle: A Process For Planning
by Nigel Coutts, thelearnersway.net
Ed note: Part 1 of this 2-part series can be seen here; note that some of the language has been slightly revised from the original post by Nigel.
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2014 Breaks Heat Record, Challenging Global Warming Skeptics

2014 Breaks Heat Record, Challenging Global Warming Skeptics | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Extreme land temperatures were accompanied by an unusually warm ocean surface virtually everywhere except around Antarctica, scientists reported.
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Sally Ride Science Invites Students to Snap Photos from Space

Sally Ride Science Invites Students to Snap Photos from Space | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
  Sally Ride Science is inviting students to take photos of earth later this month using a special camera aboard the International Space Station. A new mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM is scheduled Jan.
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W.Va, Wyo. Debate Climate-Change Mentions in Science Standards - Education Week News

W.Va, Wyo. Debate Climate-Change Mentions in Science Standards - Education Week News | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
W.Va. is the second state to have a debate surface over climate-change language in the Next Generation Science Standards for K-12 schools.
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Windows on Earth

Windows on Earth | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it

"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.  These images  help astronauts share their experience, and help you see Earth from a global perspective."


Tags: images, art, space, remote sensing, geospatial.


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tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 19, 12:06 AM
www.bharatemployment.com
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Informal Science - A resource and online community for informal learning projects, research, and evaluation

Informal Science - A resource and online community for informal learning projects, research, and evaluation | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
The Perspectives blog features spotlights of informal STEM learning projects, circulates updates from the National Science Foundation, disseminates materials related to CAISE Initiatives, shares Perspectives on special topics related to informal...
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Is Coal Money Challenging Climate Science In Secondary Schools? - Forbes

Is Coal Money Challenging Climate Science In Secondary Schools? - Forbes | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Not to be deterred, President Obama came out swinging during his State of the Union address, saying that “no challenge” is more daunting than that of climate change.
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Useful information to use as students come to understand numerous impacts on our climate.

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2015 Biomimicry Global Design Challenge Offering $100K to Nature-Inspired ... - Sustainable Brands

2015 Biomimicry Global Design Challenge Offering $100K to Nature-Inspired ... - Sustainable Brands | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, the Biomimicry Institute and the Ray C.

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Amazon Rainforest Workshops's curator insight, January 23, 4:33 PM

This is very exciting - a great STEM example that takes engineering out of the tech department and into the bio classroom.  

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Making water a renewable resource

Making water a renewable resource | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Would you drink a glass of water that had been purified from human waste? Bill Gates did recently in order to highlight a water purification system that his foundation helped develop.
But realistically, we all have done the same...
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How To Create Interesting And Educational InfoGraphics

http://fun-factory-store.net/blog/Infographic-Templates-Design-Pack-of-Best-Infographics.html Infographics are a visual representation of data. When people create infographics, they are using...

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 21, 11:16 PM

Without "interesting" we are left with only noise.

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Resources for Assessment in Project-Based Learning

Resources for Assessment in Project-Based Learning | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Looking for tools and strategies for effective assessment in project-based learning? To support you, we've assembled this guide to helpful resources from Edutopia and beyond.
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Ocean Life Faces Mass Extinction, Broad Study Says

Ocean Life Faces Mass Extinction, Broad Study Says | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Scientists find what they say are clear signs that humans are beginning to damage oceans on an unprecedented scale.
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The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
Instead of believing in the right/left brain, learning styles, and that we use only ten percent of our brains, we should focus on neuroscience research.
Diane Johnson's insight:

Just as NGSS advocate, we should examine the evidence and the validity of it before accepting information that may appear in the popular press.

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West Virginia wanted to teach students anti-science nonsense. Teachers fought back—and won.

West Virginia wanted to teach students anti-science nonsense. Teachers fought back—and won. | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
State officials tried to add climate change skepticism to the curriculum. Now they've reversed course.
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Why Billions of Exoplanets Are Suddenly Looking Much More Habitable Than Before

Why Billions of Exoplanets Are Suddenly Looking Much More Habitable Than Before | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
A new astrophysics study just raised the chances for finding life on exoplanets across the universe.

 

If you're on the hunt for Earth-like planets that can sustain life, then your best bet might not be stars that look like our sun, but smaller, cooler stars—orange and red dwarfs. These, on average, have been found to host more Earth-sized planets, and they are far and away the most abundant. They make up more than 75 percent of the stars in our universe, and nearly every red dwarf star has at least one exoplanet. 

But there's a potentially fatal flaw here: When exoplanets orbiting these stars are the right distance to hold liquid water, they tend suffer from what astronomers call rotational lockup. Much like how one side of our Moon always faces the Earth, one side of the planet always faces its star. With an always-day desert on one side and an arctic hellscape on the other, any planet's chance of being habitable looks far less likely. 

Here comes some good news, though. A team of astrophysicists has announced that this thinking could be wrong—rotational lockup is not necessarily the rule for these exoplanets. As they report in the journal Science, the simple existence of an atmosphere (even one as thin as Earth's) can keep a planet twirling and habitable. According to Jérémy Leconte, the theoretical astrophysicist at the University of Toronto who lead the team that made this discovery, the finding means that a large number of already discovered Earth-like planets might be a lot more habitable than we thought. "Planets with potential oceans could thus have a climate that is much more similar to the Earth's than we've previously expected," he says.


So how does an atmosphere cause a planet to spin faster? Jeff Coughlin, a SETI astronomer working with Kepler planet-hunting mission (who was not involved in the research), explains it this way: "On Earth, light from the sun is what drives the weather in our atmosphere. And that weather, in the form of wind, constantly pushes against the planet—running into mountains, for example, or creating waves on the ocean. This friction is deposited in the rotation rate of our planet, helping to speed it up or slow it down." 

Astrophysicists knew this. But, Coughlin says, scientists also believed that for an atmosphere to have an appreciable impact on a locked planet's rotation, it'd have to be incredibly, almost absurdly massive. Consider the case of Venus, which is close enough to our sun to be locked up rotationally. That hellish planet spins just fast enough to escape lockup (so slowly that one Venus day lasts 243 Earth days). And Venus's atmosphere is enormous—around 90 times as dense as our own. 

But, when Leconte and his fellow researchers created and ran the first computer model of how an exoplanet's atmosphere might affect its rotation, they found something surprising. In fact, thinner atmospheres actually have a larger rotational effect on their planets. This might seem counterintuitive, but the reason seems to be that thinner atmospheres scatter less starlight. When starlight pierces into a planet’s atmosphere without scattering, the extra heat creates a stronger atmospheric tide (a bulging of atmosphere, much like our ocean’s tides) that yanks on the surface of the planet as it evens out, creating a stronger planetary rotation. 

Using this model, Leconte's team found that Earth-sized planets with an Earth-like atmosphere will spin healthily around stars as small as orange dwarfs and some red dwarfs. The same could be true for even smaller stars, depending on the size of a planet and thickness of its atmosphere. If Venus were to have an atmosphere like Earth's—90 percent less dense than its real atmosphere—then it would spin about 10 times faster. 

"More and more, we're discovering that there's a lot of ways to have a very nice, habitable planet around dwarf stars," Coughlin says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Devin Julian Lee Sykes's curator insight, January 17, 12:28 PM

Well this made me remember my childhood dreams of working towards being an astrophysicist and working with NASA.

Yumma Mudra's curator insight, January 22, 3:11 AM

les planètes Terres

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5 Fantastic, Fast Formative Assessment Tools

5 Fantastic, Fast Formative Assessment Tools | NGSS Resources | Scoop.it
With tools like Socrative, Kahoot, Zaption, Chatzy, and Plickers, teachers can use tech for immediate feedback about how students are learning and understanding the lesson.
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