NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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UK 'sleepwalking into violating disabled people's human rights'

UK 'sleepwalking into violating disabled people's human rights' | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Welfare reforms break UN convention and will leave many without crucial help for daily living, say campaigners

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Education Foundation and Facebook collaborate to launch teacher-toolkit

Education Foundation and Facebook collaborate to launch teacher-toolkit | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

The Education Foundation has joined forces with Facebook and education leaders from across the UK to create a new, toolkit; one designed to introduce teachers to the use of social media in and around the classroom. The free set of resources will be hosted at Edusocial.info, and will contain a range of practical guidance and advice built from over two years of work in UK schools, colleges and universities to apply social media to learning.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 30, 2014 1:21 PM

This looks like a useful resource for educators interested in using Facebook with students.

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Educational Technology Is Making Achievement Gaps Even Bigger

Educational Technology Is Making Achievement Gaps Even Bigger | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

This is not a story of the familiar “digital divide”—a lack of access to technology for poor and minority children. This has to do, rather, with a phenomenon Neuman and Celano observed again and again in the two libraries: Granted access to technology, affluent kids and poor kids use tech differently. They select different programs and features, engage in different types of mental activity, and come away with different kinds of knowledge and experience.

 


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 30, 2014 5:03 AM

A misleading title, but an interesting article.

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This French tech school has no teachers, no books, no tuition fees

This French tech school has no teachers, no books, no tuition fees | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

It has no teachers. No books. No MOOCs. No dorms, gyms, labs, or student centers. No tuition.

And yet it plans to turn out highly qualified, motivated software engineers, each of whom has gone through an intensive two- to three-year program designed to teach them everything they need to know to become outstanding programmers.


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Rebecca Haders's curator insight, June 22, 2014 8:33 AM

affordable education.  I hope this works

Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, June 22, 2014 10:22 AM
no teachers, no books, no tuition but a huge donation ...
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2014 5:48 AM

Worth watching developments,though I can see this having instant appeal to some H.E. Managers and politicians

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6 Models of Blended Learning

6 Models of Blended Learning | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Discover how six blended learning models combine traditional classroom experiences with online learning for successful student results.

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Jean-Christophe Francet's curator insight, July 16, 2014 5:29 AM

Excellent explanation of the different possible mixes between online and offline learning.

Yvonne Middelkoop's curator insight, July 21, 2014 2:25 AM

 Handy infographic with six basic models

Julia Echeverría's curator insight, August 30, 2014 1:44 PM

Cada día vemos como el B-learning avanza y los profesores no deberían permanecer indiferentes

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How technology rewrites literature

How technology rewrites literature | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Fom typing on a rolling stream of white space to editing in a cloud, shifts in hardware have altered the way writers research, draft, refine and, ultimately, conceive of their work. The basic mechanism may stay the same, but new tools have led to new relations between authors and the words they use. With the internet, the barrier between the writer and the world has become as thin as skin.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 5, 2014 4:20 AM

Interesting perspectives on how technology has impacted on the creation of literature.

flea palmer's curator insight, July 7, 2014 10:04 AM

Interesting account of how technology has changed the writing process although it seems pen and paper is still used often!

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What is flipped learning?

What is flipped learning? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

To counter common misconceptions and bring clarity to discussions about “Flipped Learning,” the governing board and key leaders of the Flipped Learning Network (FLN) announced a formal definition of the term. They also released the Four Pillars of F-L-I-P™ and a checklist of eleven indicators that educators must incorporate into their practice.


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Darlene Wolinski's curator insight, July 15, 2014 10:01 AM

Summer reading.

Yvonne Middelkoop's curator insight, July 21, 2014 2:22 AM
What is flipped learning?
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, October 24, 2014 4:34 AM

A propos des classes inversée.

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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 2014 6:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:49 PM

APHG-U1

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


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Brady Jones's comment, February 9, 6:55 PM
Measurements from the Landsat satellite also make it possible to tell how much water the crops consume in an arid environment. Such measurements are likely to become more important as demands on limited water resources increase. Currently, agriculture accounts for 85 percent of the world’s fresh water consumption
Dennis Swender's curator insight, February 10, 12:39 AM
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Brieanna Hepburn's comment, February 13, 6:15 PM
With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food.
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:28 AM

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, suffers from overpopulation. As funny and nerve-wrecking this video was, it shows an instability on how important technology is in order for safety. In the video we can see cars just passing by fast and furociuosly within centimeters of crashing in the car in front of it. There is no one guiding traffic and nonetheless, any stop and traffic lights on the streets. It is a free for all in the middle of the capital when it comes to driving and this is a lack of safety for the people in Bangladesh. It is almost impossible for people to cross the road without a high risk of getting driven over. We can also see how there are so many cars in the are was well. The region is very overpopulated and to think how worse it would be if everyone in the area owned a car. 

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:28 AM

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, suffers from overpopulation. As funny and nerve-wrecking this video was, it shows an instability on how important technology is in order for safety. In the video we can see cars just passing by fast and furociuosly within centimeters of crashing in the car in front of it. There is no one guiding traffic and nonetheless, any stop and traffic lights on the streets. It is a free for all in the middle of the capital when it comes to driving and this is a lack of safety for the people in Bangladesh. It is almost impossible for people to cross the road without a high risk of getting driven over. We can also see how there are so many cars in the are was well. The region is very overpopulated and to think how worse it would be if everyone in the area owned a car. 

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Librarians Concerned Digital Content Licences Overriding Exceptions, Limitations | Intellectual Property Watch

Librarians Concerned Digital Content Licences Overriding Exceptions, Limitations | Intellectual Property Watch | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

While exceptions and limitations for librarians and archives are under negotiation at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) this week, librarians and archivists called on WIPO delegates to address an issue of contract licences for digital content, which they say often override such exceptions and limitations.


The 28th session of the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) is taking place from 30 June to 4 July.


A side event was held on 30 June by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) entitled, “Keeping Copyright Relevant in the digital environment: libraries, archives and licences.” It questioned the impact of digital content licence terms and conditions on the mission of libraries and archives.


“We are moving from owning physical content to licensing digital ones,” said Simonetta Vezzoso, copyright consultant at the Associazione Italiana Biblioteche (Italy). This is an ongoing and increasingly important transition, she said.


Libraries are spending billions of dollars each year on licensed digital content, but amounts spent on content differ dramatically, said Ellen Broad, manager of digital projects at IFLA. There is little transparency in costs across suppliers, Vezzoso added.


The core mission of libraries include: long-term preservation, archival availability, lending, collection development, digital resources availability for research, education, teaching and library sharing. These are hampered by some licence terms and conditions, said Vezzoso. She gave an example of a licence that does not permit long-term preservation, lending, archive availability, collection development and research.


Click headline to read more--


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Games Can Advance Education: A Conversation With James Paul Gee

Games Can Advance Education: A Conversation With James Paul Gee | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

In school, we give people texts when they have not had enough experience in the worlds the texts are about, the experiences that give the texts meaning. It is as if we were to give kids game manuals without the games. It only works for kids who are getting a lot of experiences at home—backed up by lots of talk with adults about these experiences, talk which helps the kids learn to map language on to experience and vice-versa—but it is disastrous for less advantaged kids.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 5, 2014 3:58 AM

Interesting interview with James Paul Gee

Julia Echeverría's curator insight, July 5, 2014 5:24 AM

Interesante planteamiento de una problemática

Julia Echeverría's curator insight, August 30, 2014 1:47 PM

El problema es que los niños desfavorecidos son una aplastante mayoría

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The Place of Virtual, Pedagogic and Physical Space in the 21st Century Classroom

The Place of Virtual, Pedagogic and Physical Space in the 21st Century Classroom | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
This paper outlines work connected to the successful convergence of digital, pedagogic and physical space. The Sydney Centre for Innovation in Learning (SCIL) has been focusing on the gap that has existed in schools where the physical layout is often stuck in an industrial-era education model, rather than reflecting the possibilities of ICT-enhanced personalised learning. SCIL has been working to create digital spaces so that students can consistently transition from

the real to virtual world


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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 14, 2014 8:41 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Lia Goren's curator insight, July 15, 2014 9:41 AM

More recent researchers have been quick to highlight that in a world of rapid technological change, today’s students are demonstrating serious signs of disengagement. As Marc Prensky highlights in ‘Engage Me or Enrage Me – What Today’s Learners Demand’ (Prensky, 2005,p.2):


“Rather than being empowered to choose what they want … and to see what interests them … and to create their own personalized identity – as they are in the rest of their lives – in school, they must eat what they are served. And what they are being served is, for the most part, stale, bland, and almost entirely stuff from the past. Yesterday’s education for tomorrow’s kids.”


The challenge is patently clear – schools have to embrace the ‘megachange’ required and construct new paradigms for learning in the twenty first century world. Mavers made the comment that:


“As digital technologies proliferate and become established in the everyday world of home, work and community, schools are inhabited by young people who are experienced users of a range of media and whose use is characterized by agency and adaptability.” (MAvErS, 2007, P.52) 3The Place of Virtual, Pedagogic and Physical Space in the 21st Century Classroom — Stephen Harris Page 5 No longer is the change a topic for conversation, it is an imperative.


Guski talked about the importance of spatial perception in school architecture, highlighting that ‘we don’t only see an object, we also feel, smell, taste and hear it’. (Guski, 2000, p.2) and Walden picks up that same spatial theme stating that:


“A space is much more than four walls, floor and ceiling. The spatial conditions that should be considered for human well-being include color scheme, lighting, heating, cooling and ventilation, acoustics, smells and furnishings. All these aspects can significantly influence the sense of well-being and readiness to learn and therefore learning performance.” (WALDEN, 2009, P.78)

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, July 15, 2014 10:45 AM

Los espacios en el aula del Siglo XXI

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In Defense of Laptops in the College Classroom

In Defense of Laptops in the College Classroom | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

The case for a laptop-free classroom is indeed strong. Last week on The New Yorker’s website, Dartmouth professor Dan Rockmore wrote that he’s banned laptops for years, explaining that “any advantage that might be gained by having a machine at the ready, or available for the primary goal of taking notes, was negligible at best” for his curriculum.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 22, 2014 6:46 AM

If you have students with laptops in your classroom, why on earth would you be wasting their time asking them to take notes on a lecture?

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Donald Clark Plan B: From Rift Valley to Oculus Rift (7 lessons learnt at eLearning Africa)

Donald Clark Plan B: From Rift Valley to Oculus Rift (7 lessons learnt at eLearning Africa) | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Africa is rising and needs, not the failed models of the developed world but new models that are more suited to the massive demand that already exists for education and training. This is not more universities but more vocational learning. The great opportunity here, is to use the great gifts of the internet, that are already there, for free.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 5, 2014 4:07 AM

Some very valuable insights

harloff's curator insight, June 6, 2014 9:44 AM

Africa has more to gain from EduTech innovations than the rest of the world. This was confirmed at the 9th eLearning Africa conference last week.

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UNESCO Office in Bangkok: Educators’ attentive use key to maximizing ICT benefits in early years education

UNESCO Office in Bangkok: Educators’ attentive use key to maximizing ICT benefits in early years education | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Creative and innovative applications of ICT have been used as important potential tools by both parents and early childhood educators in order to provide support for children’s early learning at home and within early year settings.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 1, 2014 4:14 AM

Interesting article with some useful research references.

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Corporate Human Rights Abuses Are Fine, United States Tells the UN

Corporate Human Rights Abuses Are Fine, United States Tells the UN | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Good news: The United Nations has recently approved the implementation of a legally binding body that can punish corporations that commit human rights abuses.

Bad news: The United States is furious and says it will refuse to abide by any repercussions this Human Rights Council-approved body should assign.

Up until now, the UN’s standards for corporate accountability have been strictly voluntarily. Resolving that waving a metaphorical finger at companies that commit human rights abuses was insufficient, in 2013, Ecuador initiated a proposal to hold international offenders responsible for their immoral actions. More than 80 other countries signed on, agreeing that actual accountability was necessary to diminish human rights abuse. With help from South Africa, Ecuador finally convinced the HRC to vote on the issue last week; the resolution passed by a 20-14 vote.

Alas, it’s the nations who voted no that are being the most vocal at this point, with the United States and nations in the European Union leading the charge. Before the vote, they lobbied hard to have nations reject Ecuador’s proposal; since losing, they have thrown what amounts to a hissy fit. ...“



Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/corporate-human-rights-abuses-are-fine-united-states-tells-the-un.html#ixzz36jXyPN00


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Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy

Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Is limiting the use of the Arabic word for God a sign of growing intolerance towards minorities?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2014 3:31 PM

In Arabic, the word Allah means God.  Christian Arabs refer to God as Allah and Arabic versions of the Bible reference Allah.  As Arabic and Islam have diffused in interwoven patterns, the linguistic root and the theological meanings have became intertwined to some.  BBC World and Al-Jazeera have reported on this issue as the Malaysian government has attempted to ban the use of the word Allah to any non-Muslim religious group.  Language and religion just got very political.  


Tags: languagereligion, political, Malaysia, SouthEastAsia, culture, Islam.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, June 25, 2014 4:25 PM

 Yes !!  The religion of love and peace, is not a religion, and sure that  not a pacific love,  just a bunch of hatred and criminals wich endanger  the  world, in the name  of a pedophile crazy, Muhamad, and  and  inexisting  allah, a  Devil, not a  God !!  The  Obama`s   "Holly  Curan ", a  dirty   instruction book  for killing !! 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 27, 2015 8:28 AM

Religion and politics are often effect each other in ways people can never imagine. Even in Western nations, were religion is separated from the state, religion still plays a major role in many political debates. This law banning the use of the word Allah by non- Muslim people in Malaysia is an extension of the political movement within Islam. Politics has been the major reason for the rise of the radical sect of Islam. It developed as reaction to the perceived westernizing of Muslim nations that was occurring in the 20th century. The Iranian revolution was a response to the westernizing polices of the Shah. It replaced a secular government with a theocratic one. ISIS main goal is to establish a caliphate i.e. a ruling empire. Throughout history, religion has been used as an excuse to build dynasties and gain more power. Politics in the true motivation behind much of this radicalization.

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African borders

African borders | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 14, 2015 9:45 PM

In all honesty, the history of Africa intrigues me. I've always tried to expand my knowledge on the subject as well as stay current with its modern affairs (as best as possible). I have had the pleasure of studying abroad in South Africa for a semester as well as taking courses focusing on the vast continent throughout my career as a RIC student. 

Ancient Africa is a topic I know more about than the average person. It's slavery and the effects it had on the realm, followed by Colonialism/Post Colonialism that I like to take pride in knowing best. I've taken different courses focusing on the matter and have done my fair share of research for pleasure. However, I still have a lot more research to do because I have so many thoughts, questions, and comments  (before making a comment on a particular subject I like to research it in depth) to make. 

I have the desire to pursue an education focusing on "Africa" and its colonial aspects. I feel like I would pursue a solid topic of high interest-perhaps even importance- to me and research the dickens out of it. I would prefer it to be an original piece though. Not a blunt history of colonial rule in Africa, whether it be specific or broad. I do not want to reiterate what others have already side. I want to create my own theories on Africa. 

Currently I am quite interested in "Post-Colonial" Africa and the fact that I find this term to be exotic, foreign, and even a facade. There are colonial aspects of Africa that have existed for decades and will continue to do so as long as Western and Eastern (China) "business" is "functioning." "Business" is broad yet it is being used here to describe the basic global economy, producers and consumers thus a subsequent supply and demand. Now, what does the term "functioning" mean? Well, to simply put it, business functions through Africa's exponential amount of natural resources, cheap labor, and corrupt officials. Most of the civilized world benefits from Africa's numerable resources yet the vast majority of African's themselves do not enjoy such pleasures. This is a trend that has existed since the Portuguese appraised the Western Coast of the continent in the early fifteenth century. 

I understand that this basic premise may not be the first of its kind, in general. However, there are specific situations/conflicts that can be researched further towards developing a more unique body of work. If I do pursue a higher education in this area I plan on succeeding in producing a sound body of work that I am proud to put my name on. It would be neat to teach the significance of the three maps displayed in this scoop.it article. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:20 AM

UNIT 4 POLITICAL 

This article shows many maps depicting the history and creation of African borders, as well as the impact of colonialism on Africa. This shows where different groups resided, and how borders were not properly made to fit one single nation, but mixed together many nations in one region.These maps are extremely useful when trying to learn more about Africa and its history, specifically its boundaries. 

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This 19th Century Map Could Have Transformed the West

This 19th Century Map Could Have Transformed the West | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Today's drought-riven west would look very different if Congress had listened to John Wesley Powell

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 11, 2014 4:33 PM

Author of Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten explains how western expansion failed to recognize the basic physical geographic reality of the United States--that the west is much drier than the east.  Given that much of the west, especially California, is in the midst of a severe drought, this article serves as a reminder to recognize that localized understandings of human and environmental actions are necessary.  Do you know what watershed you live in?  How does and should that impact us?   


Tags: physical, historical, California, water, environment.

Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, July 1, 2014 8:11 AM

We are very proud in France thinking we created the watershed approach with the 1964' water law, present basis for EU's water framework directive. Now, I would say that John W Powell is the true creator of watershed management. It's a blow to French pride...

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Revolutionary War Battles

Revolutionary War Battles | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
America's war for indpendence began on April 19, 1775, when the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts.

 

Tags: USA, historical, mapping, National Geographic.


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Foreign Investment, Humanitarian Intervention and Aid

Foreign Investment, Humanitarian Intervention and Aid | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
In this context, the role of the so-called 'development aid' is totally misunderstood or deliberately misrepresented. Aid is corruption. Why? Because it corrupts government policy. In return for 'aid' governments in Africa are ...
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Who is Foreign Aid For? Foreigners or US Corporations?

Who is Foreign Aid For? Foreigners or US Corporations? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
U.S. foreign aid is expected to promote poverty alleviation and facilitate developmental growth in impoverished countries. Yet, corporations and special interest groups have permeated even the most well-intended of U.S. ...
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