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Should we ban boys-only schools? - Thought Leader

Should we ban boys-only schools? - Thought Leader | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Should we ban boys-only schools? Thought Leader The behaviour of the men who attend boys-only schools, and the cultural practices that are an indelible part of the boys-school experience, clearly highlight the problems of masculinity and...
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Everything Wrong in ICT4D Academia in One Research Paper | Humanitarian News

Everything Wrong in ICT4D Academia in One Research Paper | Humanitarian News | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Did you know you could set up a Google Scholar Alert for academic papers that mention your favorite topic? I have one set up for “ICT4D” just to see what research is new or interesting in my favorite profession.
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Study says health policy researchers steer clear of social media

Study says health policy researchers steer clear of social media | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

In  the conglomerate of voices dominating people's Twitter feeds, health policy researchers lack a distinct presence.

Health policy researchers are reluctant to tap into social media to spread their findings, according to a recent Penn study. Moreover, their reluctance stems from a lack of confidence in web outlets.

“We were surprised by the level of nervousness and anxiety in engaging in social media as researchers, “ Assistant professor of medicine David Grande said. “Many were worried that using social media could get them in trouble in some ways, and even cause their findings to be confused or misinterpreted.”

Grande and assistant professor of medicine Zachary Meisel, led a team of researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine in investigating why health policy researchers are so reluctant to use social media channels. The team surveyed 215 researchers, mostly M.D. ’s and Ph.D. ’s.

According to Grande — who is also co-director of policy at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics — the team was interested by the disconnect in communication in American healthcare. They figured that social media could play an important role in improving communication regarding health policy.

The research team was not surprised by their findings — in fact, they expected very few of the survey participants to engage in social media based on their personal experiences in the field.

“Broadly speaking, traditional academic publications and journals are the most valued in academia,” Grande said. “The highest measure of success in the field is how many times an article is cited in other articles. Researchers are already reluctant to use other forms of dissemination to other audiences, and social media is even further out from traditional media, bringing an even higher risk.”

Nevertheless, Grande and his team did not hesitate to use social media to share their discovery. They took full advantage of the web by creating a blog post about the article they published in Health Affairs. 

They even took their findings to Twitter, tweeting links to both the original article and the blog post.



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Dangarembga: Speaking the 'unspeakable' through film - New Zimbabwe.com

Dangarembga: Speaking the 'unspeakable' through film - New Zimbabwe.com | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
New Zimbabwe.com
Dangarembga: Speaking the 'unspeakable' through film
New Zimbabwe.com
The study of film theory and the way the medium speaks to the individual and shapes the individual consciousness, was still a specialist area.
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Defending Baghdad: Iraqi forces tighten grip, ring capital against ISIS - CNN

Defending Baghdad: Iraqi forces tighten grip, ring capital against ISIS - CNN | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Defending Baghdad: Iraqi forces tighten grip, ring capital against ISIS CNN Baghdad, Iraq (CNN) -- A commercial airliner roars overhead as one of the thousands of fighters who have taken up arms to protect the Iraqi capital digs into a position a...
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Egypt's shifting tide of press freedom - Aljazeera.com

Egypt's shifting tide of press freedom - Aljazeera.com | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Toronto Star
Egypt's shifting tide of press freedom
Aljazeera.com
... Egyptian TV personality, Ibrahim Eissa, who was once sentenced to prison for the charge of publishing false news, parroted the government's accusations and supported the verdict.
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A Challenge to Press Freedom? Google Now "Forgets" Web/Blog Posts On ... - Nigerian Bulletin

A Challenge to Press Freedom? Google Now "Forgets" Web/Blog Posts On ... - Nigerian Bulletin | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A Challenge to Press Freedom? Google Now "Forgets" Web/Blog Posts On ...
Nigerian Bulletin
Tech A Challenge to Press Freedom? Google Now "Forgets" Web/Blog Posts On Request. Discussion in 'Tech News' started by Jules, Jul 3, 2014 at 5:26 PM .
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UN rural development agency says climate change and food security challenges 'inextricably linked'

UN rural development agency says climate change and food security challenges 'inextricably linked' | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
At Durban conference, IFAD President highlights potential of smallholder agriculture
The President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), Kanayo F. Nwanze, urged negotiators at the global climate change conference to recogni

Via Dr Lendy Spires
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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, July 7, 2014 1:14 AM

The President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), Kanayo F. Nwanze, urged negotiators at the global climate change conference to recognize that “there is no trade-off between feeding people and saving our planet.”

“It is clear that food security and climate change, humanity’s two greatest challenges in the 21st century, are inextricably linked,” Nwanze said.

 

Nwanze will give a keynote address at the Agriculture and Rural Development Day (ARDD) event on 3 December, accompanying the 17th Conference of the Parties (COP17) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

“Negotiators need to recognize the critical importance of enabling smallholder farmers to become more resilient to climate change and to grow more food in environmentally sustainable, climate-smart ways,” he added.

 

According to IFAD, the world’s 500 million smallholder farms will have to significantly increase their production over the next four decades to keep pace with a growing global population. And they will have to do it in the face of more frequent extreme weather events and shifting weather conditions brought by climate change.

Prior to his departure for Durban, Nwanze stressed that despite the slow pace of climate negotiations, IFAD is now seeing “significant, tangible changes” in developing countries towards sustainable agriculture.

 

“Out in their fields, farmers are already adapting to the changing climate and realizing that they must respect and preserve the environment if they are to feed their families and produce a surplus for markets,” Nwanze said. “And policymakers at the country level are citing the impact of extreme weather on their crop production and asking for climate change to be addressed in rural development projects.”

 

Noting that global investment in agriculture had dropped by half over the past 30 years, Nwanze said efforts should be directed at expanding public investment in research to build farmers’ resilience to climate change and to support their adoption of sustainable agricultural practices.

 

IFAD-supported initiatives in Burkina Faso, China, Ethiopia, Peru and elsewhere are showing success in helping poor farmers increase their productivity and incomes. These farmers make maximum use of natural processes, thereby reducing the need for environmentally harmful external inputs.

 

“There is already a scaling up of sustainable agricultural practices in many parts of the world,” Nwanze added.  “What we need now is a rapid acceleration of these changes so that smallholder farmers can successfully feed their families, connect to markets and contribute more to global food production.”

 

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Smallholders at Risk: Monoculture expansion, land, food and livelihoods in Latin America | Oxfam International

Smallholders at Risk: Monoculture expansion, land, food and livelihoods in Latin America | Oxfam International | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
3 case studies of agribusiness investment: Paraguay, Guatemala, and Colombia http://t.co/QOBZx807Nx #agchat
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8 Growth Principles that Transform Leadership

8 Growth Principles that Transform Leadership | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Radical growth is the messiest - most painful - part of leadership. Death precedes life. Incremental growth is walking down familiar paths carrying the same assumptions. But, the first - real step ...
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10 World Heritage sites in Africa...which you've probably never heard of

10 World Heritage sites in Africa...which you've probably never heard of | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A journey of surprises through Algeria, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, South Africa, Egypt and mysterious corners of Benin.

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'I helped Mugabe to win,' says Baba Jukwa

'I helped Mugabe to win,' says Baba Jukwa | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Sunday Mail editor Edmund Kudzayi being accused of being Baba Jukwa says he was one of the masterminds behind President Robert Mugabe and Zanu-PF victory in last year's July 31 elections.
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What Nigeria's president should have said - Chicago Tribune

What Nigeria's president should have said - Chicago Tribune | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Times of India What Nigeria's president should have said Chicago Tribune I have remained quiet about Nigeria's continuing efforts to find the girls kidnapped in April from the northern town of Chibok, because, honestly, I hoped the world would...
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Zimbabwe: I Helped Mugabe Win, Says 'Baba Jukwa' | 247pk.pk:Latest News Headlines

[Zimbabwe Standard]Sunday Mail editor, Edmund Kudzayi, who the state alleges is behind the shadowy and controversial Facebook character, Baba Jukwa, says he was one of the masterminds behind President Robert Mugabe and Zanu-PF's victory in last...
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IFAD President calls on African Union leaders to invest in sustainable rural development for all

IFAD President calls on African Union leaders to invest in sustainable rural development for all | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, July 7, 2014 1:06 AM


Rome/Malabo 26 June 2014 - The President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) spoke today at the African Union (AU) Summit to reinforce his message about the immediate need for investment in the continent’s small farms. These farms make up 80 per cent of all farms in sub-Saharan Africa.

IFAD President Kanayo F. Nwanze was invited to speak on the panel discussion as a part of the 23rd AU Summit, which began today in Malabo, the Republic of Equatorial Guinea.

 

The panel discussion, which was attended by heads of state from across Africa, focused on the designated AU Year of Agriculture and Food Security.

“We have no excuse,” Nwanze said prior to leaving for Malabo. “Africa has the largest share of uncultivated land with rain-fed crop potential. Many African nations are becoming economic powerhouses, but without a viable agricultural sector and strong rural economy, I do not see a viable future for Africa.”

 

Not only is agriculture a well-documented engine for economic growth and poverty reduction in developing nations, but there is also evidence that growth derived from staple crop production has a higher impact on poverty reduction than growth from export crops such as coffee, tea and tobacco, Nwanze said.

The AU Summit marks 10 years since the signing of the Maputo Declaration in Mozambique, where countries promised to allocate 10 per cent or more of their national budgets for agriculture. So far, only seven have done so consistently.

 

“Certainly, there is no shortage of demand,” Nwanze said, calling on leaders to invest in agriculture. “Today, Africa imports US$35 billion worth of food every year. This is food that can be and should be grown in Africa by Africans. This is money that should be flowing in to support African businesses, not out.”

Earlier this week in an open letter to AU heads of state published in media outlets across Africa and elsewhere, Nwanze pointed out that the only way to build a resilient food and nutrition-secure future is to invest in the continent’s rural people.

 

“A full 60 per cent of our people depend wholly or partly on agriculture for their livelihoods, and the vast majority of them live below the poverty line,” Nwanze wrote in the open letter. “It’s not pity and handouts that they need. It’s access to markets and finance, land tenure security, knowledge and technology, and policies that favour small farms and make it easier for them to do business.”

In the letter he wrote that this is a crucial time for Africa to accelerate progress on food security; 2014 marks the International Year of Family Farming and also has focused world attention on the definition of future goals and targets after the Millennium Development Goals expire in 2015.

 

Today in Malabo, Tumusiime Rhoda Peace, AU Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, opened the panel discussion on ways to boost farm productivity and improve livelihoods amid increasingly difficult economic and environmental challenges. Other panellists were the President of the African Development Bank, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the Director-General of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization.

 

The message Nwanze took with him to Malabo is that a rural transformation can happen if leaders’ keep their eyes on future goals rather than present gains. “Africa is home to some of the world’s fastest growing economies,” he said. “Life expectancy is improving, while child and maternal mortality rates are falling across the continent. But our pride must be tempered by reality. As we debate how to transform African agriculture, we must think not only of today but of the years to come."

 

As he pointed out in his open letter, there is hope. “We know the real Africa, filled with possibilities, dignity and opportunities, able to face its challenges and solve them from within. Never has the time been more right for us to finally realize our full potential. It is within our grasp.”

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Can Africa create a new green generation of food producers?

Can Africa create a new green generation of food producers? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it


By 2040 Africa will be home to one in five of the planet’s young people. What kind of work can they expect to find?


According to the International Labor Organisation, today over 81 million young people aged 18 to 25 are unemployed globally. 


...In Africa, young migrants from rural areas, many of them jobless, are described as the “new urban”. Africa’s rate of urbanisation, at 3.5 percent per year, is the highest in the world, concentrating disadvantaged populations and straining local resources.


That’s because by 2030, three in five people in urban areas will be younger than 18. Should this huge and combustible population continue to lack employment, then civil unrest and crime are likely to rise....


...Fortunately, by making cost-effective investments in ecosystem productivity, many African countries have already begun to realise bigger benefits....


...Creating the right policy environment is as essential as adequate education. This includes ensuring that youth are engaged, excited about and well-educated in different kinds of work related to food production.

Use of electronic devices and mobile phones is one example of how new technologies are revitalising traditional industries in Africa.


Utilising channels like this to promote agriculture and educate young people could go a long way in engaging new groups of people with the sector. Greater awareness of the benefits of agriculture as a career needs to be built amongst young people, in particular highlighting opportunities for greater market engagement, innovation and farming as a business.


Primary and high school education could include modules on farming, from growing to marketing crops. Youths need to become part of policy discussions at the local and national levels....


...Policies must also support small-scale producers. When nearly three quarters of the household budget is spent on food, few Africans can afford a 25 percent price hike on a staple. That’s why the African Union has declared 2014 the “Year of Agriculture and Food Security”....




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A National Study of Theories and Their Importan...

A National Study of Theories and Their Importan... | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their practices for faculty development for online teaching and particularly the content and training activities used during...
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Smog-Reducing Buildings Aim to Combat Pollution Levels - AccuWeather.com ("way to go!")

Smog-Reducing Buildings Aim to Combat Pollution Levels - AccuWeather.com ("way to go!") | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Smog-Reducing Buildings Aim to Combat Pollution Levels
AccuWeather.com
Air pollution is currently the world's largest single environmental health risk, according to the World Health Organization and a recent news release.

In 2013, the Manuel Gea González Hospital in Mexico City unveiled a façade made out of titanium dioxide coating designed specifically to reduce smog. The façade is made of modules called prosolve370e and designed by the Berlin-based Elegant Embellishments. The titanium dioxide is a pollution-fighting technology that is activated by ambient daylight as described on the product's website.

Hugo Destaillats, staff scientist with the Environmental Energy Technologies Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Lab in Berkeley, California, has done similar research on a laboratory scale and verified that titanium dioxide is effective in removing pollution.

"There are many studies by numerous groups around the world that also showed the same positive performance," Destaillats said.

In 2015, another building designed to fight pollution will be unveiled, this time in Milan, Italy, as part of the 2015 Milan Expo. Designed by the Italian architectural firm Nemesi & Partners, the "Palazzo Italia" encompasses 13,275 square meters (142,890 square feet) and six floors.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 6, 2014 6:57 AM

Clean air is everybody's concern, including buildings.

"However, new technologies are coming to the forefront allowing for greater opportunities to reduce pollution. One of them comes in the form of new building materials."

Ron Armstrong's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:52 PM

As responsible awareness and education continue, so do the technological advances that hopefully soon will become commercially viable for widespread use in the design of our buildings and infrastructure.  All is not lost as many would have us believe.

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Why the Supreme Court Cell Phone Decision Is a Win for Press Freedom - PBS MediaShift

Why the Supreme Court Cell Phone Decision Is a Win for Press Freedom - PBS MediaShift | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
PBS MediaShift Why the Supreme Court Cell Phone Decision Is a Win for Press Freedom PBS MediaShift Many of the most important debates surrounding press freedom and privacy right now focus on how our fundamental freedoms, so long expressed and...
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South Africa to host fifth Pan African University node - University World News

South Africa has reportedly been selected to host the southern, space sciences node of the Pan African University – after initial rejection, a five-year wait and much politicking. But the African Union Commission has not yet been officially informed.

Beatrice Njenga, head of the human resources, science and technology department at the African Union Commission, which is driving the Pan African University, told University World News last week that it had not received an official communication from the Southern African Development Community, or SADC.

“The African Union Commission remains eager to move forward on this item,” she said.

The remaining four nodes of the university – aimed at boosting postgraduate training and research across Africa – were decided some time ago and are based in Kenya, Nigeria, Cameroon and Algeria.

A meeting of SADC science ministers held in the Mozambican capital Maputo on 16-20 June reportedly decided to give the southern campus of the Pan African University, or PAU, to South Africa after five-years of indecision over its location.

This is not the first time South Africa’s Stellenbosch University has been named as a possible host. The campus was awarded to Stellenbosch by the commission in 2009 but the decision was reversed after SADC members complained that they were not properly consulted.

A report by Research Africa said that according to the draft record of the SADC science ministerial meeting, Mauritius was still keen to host the southern campus for space sciences.

Njenga told University World News last year that a proposal to site the fifth node for the PAU on the Indian Ocean island was declined because Mauritius was in the East Africa geographic region as defined by the African Union – although also a member of SADC.

She said Mauritius could, however, apply to host a satellite centre in space sciences when the opportunity was advertised.

The southern node of the university is expected to promote research in space sciences to augment Southern Africa’s hosting of the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope.

Some of the other PAU nodes are already well established and in the process of admitting a second intake of masters students, such as the East African node which focuses on basic sciences, technology and innovation and is at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology in Kenya.

The West African node is at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria and concentrates on life and earth sciences, the Central African campus is at the University of Yaoundé in Cameroon and covers the areas of governance, humanities and social science, and in North Africa, Algeria has the water, energy sciences and climate change campus.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, July 6, 2014 10:08 AM

South Africa has reportedly been selected to host the southern, space sciences node of the Pan African University – after initial rejection, a five-year wait and much politicking. But the African Union Commission has not yet been officially informed.

Beatrice Njenga, head of the human resources, science and technology department at the African Union Commission, which is driving the Pan African University, told University World News last week that it had not received an official communication from the Southern African Development Community, or SADC.

“The African Union Commission remains eager to move forward on this item,” she said.

The remaining four nodes of the university – aimed at boosting postgraduate training and research across Africa – were decided some time ago and are based in Kenya, Nigeria, Cameroon and Algeria.

A meeting of SADC science ministers held in the Mozambican capital Maputo on 16-20 June reportedly decided to give the southern campus of the Pan African University, or PAU, to South Africa after five-years of indecision over its location.

This is not the first time South Africa’s Stellenbosch University has been named as a possible host. The campus was awarded to Stellenbosch by the commission in 2009 but the decision was reversed after SADC members complained that they were not properly consulted.

A report by Research Africa said that according to the draft record of the SADC science ministerial meeting, Mauritius was still keen to host the southern campus for space sciences.

Njenga told University World News last year that a proposal to site the fifth node for the PAU on the Indian Ocean island was declined because Mauritius was in the East Africa geographic region as defined by the African Union – although also a member of SADC.

She said Mauritius could, however, apply to host a satellite centre in space sciences when the opportunity was advertised.

The southern node of the university is expected to promote research in space sciences to augment Southern Africa’s hosting of the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope.

Some of the other PAU nodes are already well established and in the process of admitting a second intake of masters students, such as the East African node which focuses on basic sciences, technology and innovation and is at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology in Kenya.

The West African node is at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria and concentrates on life and earth sciences, the Central African campus is at the University of Yaoundé in Cameroon and covers the areas of governance, humanities and social science, and in North Africa, Algeria has the water, energy sciences and climate change campus.

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Africa's Small Farmers Key to Reducing Poverty, Increasing Food Security, Ifad's President Tells Ethiopia Gathering

Africa's Small Farmers Key to Reducing Poverty, Increasing Food Security, Ifad's President Tells Ethiopia Gathering | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) called here today for greater support to Africa's small family farmers as a key to eradicating extreme poverty and hunger on the continent.

Via Dr Lendy Spires
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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, July 7, 2014 2:15 AM

 

The President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) called here today for greater support to Africa's small family farmers as a key to eradicating extreme poverty and hunger on the continent.

"There are 500 million smallholder family farms in the world providing food and livelihoods for billions of people," IFAD President Kanayo F. Nwanze said in an address today to a conference sponsored by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

 

"Investing in the resilience of smallholder farmers is also investing in the resilience of food systems, the resilience of communities, and the strength of nations."

Studies consistently show that economic growth in agriculture is significantly more effective in reducing poverty than growth generated by any other sector, Nwanze pointed out in his speech.

The IFPRI conference, titled "Building Resilience for Food and Nutrition Security," brings together leading agricultural experts and policymakers to discuss ways to boost farm productivity and improve livelihoods in low-income rural communities worldwide.

 

Among the other featured speakers at today's IFPRI forum were Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Dessalegn, IFPRI Director General Shenggen Fan, World Food Program Executive Director Ertharin Cousin, and Global Environmental Facility Chief Executive Officer Naoko Ishii.

Small farmers in Africa today face increasing risks from climate change, Nwanze emphasized in his remarks today. He noted that IFAD's "ASAP" initiative - the Adaptation for Smallholder Agricultural Program - is providing needed credit and technical help to help small farmers adjust to temperatures and extreme weather patterns, yet much more assistance of this kind is needed throughout Africa.

 

Family farms are small businesses and should be treated as such, Nwanze stressed. "Poor rural people are not looking for charity," he said. "Handouts do not build resilience; they increase dependency."‪‬‬‬‬‬‬

Africa's agricultural sector generates about a third of the continent's economic output and provides three-quarters of its jobs, mostly from small family farms, by IFAD estimates.

Yet Africa has some 60 percent of the world's uncultivated arable land, with the potential of becoming not only self-sufficient in food but a major net exporter, experts say.

 

Providing sufficient credit, marketing and technical support for small farmers is essential if the international community is to achieve the goal of eliminating famines and chronic hunger in Africa and elsewhere in the world, IFAD project reports show.

IFAD has joined the other Rome-based UN agencies - the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Food Program (WFP) - in calling for the inclusion of a "zero hunger" pledge in the post-2015 global development agenda, now under discussion at the UN for adoption by the General Assembly next year.

 

2014 is a pivotal year for accelerating progress on food security and poverty eradication, IFAD's president told the Addis gathering.

"This is the African Union's Year of Agriculture and Food Security. It is the International Year of Family Farming. And it is also the year when we are solidifying the post-2015 Agenda," he noted.

"Agriculture and rural development are essential for building resilient food and nutrition security. They provide a pathway to employment, wealth creation and economic growth."

 

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Working papers | PEP-NET

Are fuel subsidies good for poverty reduction? New PEP-UNICEF study (2014-02) analyses this in Ghana..http://t.co/v30oCLSu40
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Growing role of Islamic economics in spotlight - Zawya (registration)

Growing role of Islamic economics in spotlight - Zawya (registration) | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Growing role of Islamic economics in spotlight Zawya (registration) The symposium, which opened on Saturday, encompasses the role of the state in business activities based on Islamic economic principles and the role of endowment in the development...
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MDC condemns arrest of 'Baba Jukwa' suspect - Bulawayo24

MDC condemns arrest of 'Baba Jukwa' suspect - Bulawayo24 | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Bulawayo24 MDC condemns arrest of 'Baba Jukwa' suspect Bulawayo24 THE MDC-T has condemned the arrest of a University of Zimbabwe student in connection with the Baba Jukwa saga where Sunday Mail editor Edmund Kudzayi has been fingered as the...
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Ministers attack scribes over Baba Jukwa coverage - The Zimbabwe Mail

Ministers attack scribes over Baba Jukwa coverage - The Zimbabwe Mail | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Latest news, sport, business, comment, analysis and reviews from The Zimbabwe Mail; Zimbabwe's fair, factual and credible newpaper.
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