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The 7 characteristics of a digitally competent teacher - Infographic

The 7 characteristics of a digitally competent teacher - Infographic | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Being a proper digitally competent teacher is not as simple as picking up an iPhone and tweeting. You need to be a good digital citizen, understand privacy, and more. In an effort to clarify and explain some of the most important characteristics that a digitally competent teacher must have, we whipped up this fun visual. …

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Maryalice Leister's curator insight, June 13, 2014 7:38 AM

I like this take on the issue. Since we have moved teaching skills online, educators are charged with the same level of role modeling as they do on the ground in brick and mortar. In fact, it is even more critical to help young people understand the risks.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, June 13, 2014 10:29 PM

I really like this infographic. Are you a digitally competent teacher?

Kimberly House's curator insight, June 24, 2014 4:50 PM

Good one to remind teachers that they are more competent with digital tools than they realise! If you can shop online, you can teach online! :-)

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Blooms, SAMR & the 3 C's - iSupport

Blooms, SAMR & the 3 C's - iSupport | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

All the iPad apps you'll ever need. Aligned to Blooms Taxonomy and SAMR


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 4, 2014 8:34 PM

Do you use iPads in your school? Do you work with Bloom's Taxonomy and/or SAMR? Are you interested in seeing how you might combine Bloom's and SAMR using specific apps? If so, click through to this post.

The post takes apps and organizes in three categories:

* Consumption - which includes Knowledge and Analysis (split into Activity and Gamification)

* Collaboration - which includes Application and Synthesis (split into Assessment and Cloud Storage)

* Creation - which includes Comprehension and Evaluate (split into Multimedia & Design and Multimedia Texts)

Then read on and see how you might take these same areas and apply them to SAMR (Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition).

This is worth a look even if you do not have iPads. The ideas of placing work into the three Cs of Consumption, Collaboration and Creation may be applied to work that students do, with or without technology.

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Raise a Reader Infogram

Raise a Reader Infogram | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 10, 2014 11:48 PM

Here is a great infographic to share with parents as schools come to an end (at least in my state). Learn some of the many reasons why it is important for students to have parents (or siblings, friends, etc.) read to them after school is out. Learn some of the statistics for students whom have too much screen time and the best places to keep books in your house.

Terri Goldson's curator insight, June 12, 2014 6:32 AM

Reading is a fundamental skill that all children must develop. The foundation for the joy of reading can be developed at home. Check out the info-chart, read, learn, explore and form your own opinion.  ....Knowledge IS Power!   Terri Goldson, Sr

Molly Frances Sheridan's curator insight, May 13, 8:46 PM

This is a "numbers porn" infograph because of the amount of numbers and charts that are in it. The infograph has little other pictures so it just purely directs your attention to the numbers and the words written to back up their idea. I like how clear their ideas are but I think they need to include where they got the numbers, because some seem illegitimate. 

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Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This... Then...

Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This... Then... | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
It is the responsibility of all educators to model good digital citizenship for their students. Especially when it comes to copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property. The waters are murky. No...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 13, 2014 9:31 PM

Teaching teachers and students about copyright and asking them to respect intellectual property is not an easy task, but it is critical that we teach students that plagiarism is not acceptable (and that we follow the same rules). This infographic provides one way for teachers and students to determine what they may do and also provides information on how you may take material you have created and either place it under Creative Commons or choose to copyright the work.

niftyjock's curator insight, June 15, 2014 3:33 AM

less "catch me if you can" and more "I'll be a responsible  digital citizen"

Kimberly House's curator insight, June 15, 2014 1:32 PM

Fantastic! This is so helpful for students and teachers who are always a bit unclear on the grey areas of copyright. No matter which country you live in, these are clear and helpful.

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Teaching Through Trauma: How 1 LA school teaches despite poverty, trauma

Teaching Through Trauma: How 1 LA school teaches despite poverty, trauma | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
In this first installment of a KPCC series, we look at new research that shows the mere act of being poor can affect the brain, making it hard for kids to learn. But the changes are reversible.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:16 PM

How does poverty impact our students, especially students whom live in urban areas where trauma and stress have a significant impact on the developing brain?

Quoting from the post "Children living in poor neighborhoods are more likely to suffer traumatic incidents, like witnessing or being the victims of shootings, parental neglect or abuse. They also struggle with pernicious daily stressors, including food or housing insecurity, overcrowding and overworked or underemployed, stressed-out parents."

Yet it is possible to make a difference, and one school in Los Angeles is proving this with by working with teachers with this goal in mind "...to figure out how to “use positivity and relationships to reverse some of the negative effects of poverty.”

This link will take you to part 1 of this story and the link to part 2 is available in the story. You may also listen to each installment.

Henrietta Marcella Paz-Amor's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:13 AM

How does being poor potentially affect the brain and learning for kids? How one LA school teaches through trauma..

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Bill Clinton: Middle class key to ending poverty - Politico

Bill Clinton: Middle class key to ending poverty - Politico | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Politico Bill Clinton: Middle class key to ending poverty Politico In a speech at the centrist Hamilton Project that focused on anti-poverty policies, Clinton insisted he didn't object to President Barack Obama's focus on fighting income...
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Lopsided development: Rising inequality a major poverty reduction challenge in Pakistan – The Express Tribune

Lopsided development: Rising inequality a major poverty reduction challenge in Pakistan – The Express Tribune | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Progre­ssive tax regime essent­ial to mobili­se resour­ces for univer­sal educat­ion, health servic­es.
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Index on Censorship is being undermined by the Press-hating Hacked Off

Index on Censorship is being undermined by the Press-hating Hacked Off | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Multi-millionaire Coogan, whose one-time predilection for cocaine and lap-dancers had been exposed by the red-top Press, is the spokesman for the Hacked Off pressure group.
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A Professional Learning Teacher Toolkit

A Professional Learning Teacher Toolkit | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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Ajo Monzó's curator insight, June 20, 2:01 AM
Molt bo!
António Leça Domingues's curator insight, June 24, 2:54 AM
Kit de desenvolvimento pessoal para professores.
David W. Deeds's curator insight, Today, 7:38 PM

Very useful! Thanks to Michel Verstrepen.      

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, June 2, 2015 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

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Promoting Inclusive Social Protection in the Post-2015 Framework - Institute of Development Studies

Promoting Inclusive Social Protection in the Post-2015 Framework - Institute of Development Studies | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
IDS (Promoting Inclusive Social Protection in the Post-2015 Framework - Institute of Development Studies http://t.co/dF7ry1tp1n via @sharethis)
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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 2015 8:11 PM

The Islam-Sunni favors the father-in-law of Muhammad Abu Bakr and is strictly orthodox. The Islam-Shi'ite favors Muhammad's son-in-law Ali and it mostly practiced in Iran, southern Iraq and southern Lebanon. Sunni on the other hand is practiced throughout the northern part of Africa and throughout the whole middle east. In the middle east, 85% of the muslim population between Sunni and Shi'ite is Sunni and 15% practices Shia. Between Sunni and Shi'ite, Sunni appears to be the more popular and dominant Islamic religion.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 31, 2015 5:04 PM

The middle east is a topic of discussion for people throughout America. I say the Middle East in a broad sense because there are a numerous amount of topics one could discuss in regards to the middle east. Politics, violence, terrorism, the faith of Islam in general, the list goes on. But it seems not many people go into the Sunni Shiite conflict in depth. In order to understand much of what goes on in the Middle East one needs to understand the two divisions between Islam, why they exist and what has been the history/significance of the relationship. I wonder sometimes if the people reporting the news realize what they are saying, whom the people/groups of people involved are, and what the significance of there being is. The video shown in class involving the two news reporters discussing/asking questions  about the Middle East with a scholar on the show definitely proved people are ignorant to the Middle East. They painted it with a "broad brush." If they can't even realize the vast size of Islam and the fact that they are generalizing when reporting terrorism thus linking the faith of Islam in general to it then I can only imagine what it would do to their heads to find out that there are two main divisions of Islam. It's bad when the people reporting the news don't understand the significance of what they are saying. It raises questions as to how the American people, whom are not well versed in the Middle East, interpret Islam and its people. Reading articles and listening to discussions would certainly help educate people and honestly this "scoop" was very clear in stating the origin, meaning, and significance of the two different divisions.  

I find the oil situation in the Middle East interesting to say the least. The Shiite's are the clear minority in Islam yet they control 80% of the Middle East's oil. It is crazy to think how the Safavid Dynasty set up shop in what is now Iran... In time Iran would prove to be rich in oil. Other parts of the middle east that are extremely rich in oil like southern Iraq, the eastern region of the Arabian Peninsula and Lebanon are also Shiite. So in this case the minority has access to and controls an extreme amount of wealth. I'm sure there are people whom discuss the Middle East and oil yet don't know the religious aspects of the territory. Just through taking five minutes to read an article such as this an individual may form a different perception of Islam or specifically, in regards to this paragraph, oil in the Middle East. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:57 PM

having been to this part of the world and encountered obviously countless muslims and talking to several. i learned and witnessed first hand the hate that these people have for eachother, they are on such opposite sides of this religion and it is perplexing because it is the same religion and the debate is over such minor details of it (but judeism christianity and islam are all pretty much the same with minor differences arnt they?)

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Educator as a Maker Educator

Educator as a Maker Educator | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The following materials are being used to present to educators the idea that implementing maker education requires a different mindset, and often different roles and skills of the educator. To acce...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 2, 2014 10:36 PM

Are you interested in being known as an educator whom is also a maker educator? This post from Jackie Gerstein provides a great visual that looks as many of the roles you might play, including

* Process facilitator

* Resource suggestion provider

* Lead learner

* Relationship enabler

* Technology tutor

This visual is designed in ThingLink and if you click through from the post you will find additional resources in the visual

And you might also view a SlideShare where Gerstein provides  additional resources.

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, June 3, 2014 11:11 AM

I'd really like to make the transition in my Library Learning Commons to integrate a makerspace. My goal is to help promote a maker mentality in my school. This is a great resource to introduce the idea to teachers. 

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Teachers Surveyed on Using Games in Class

Teachers Surveyed on Using Games in Class | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
We have an early look at some of the interesting data coming out of a larger report on teacher attitudes around the use of games in the classroom. The numbers hint at wider use of games in the classroom and indicate teachers see the real benefit of games in helping low-performing students.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 9, 2014 9:17 PM

Do you think games have a place in your classroom? This newly released data is from a survey of 694 K-8 teachers in the U.S. that the Joan Ganz Cooney Center conducted in 2013 to see how teachers are using digital games in their classrooms.
What are some of the findings?

* 74% of teachers are using games in their classroom

* 55% of students play games at least once a week

* 72% of students access games on a PC or a Mac, and 41% of teachers use a white board to share games

* The two greatest barriers are the time it takes to implement games (45%) and the cost of the games (44%)

This post from Games and Learning provides the current data in both a visual and written form. There is much more to be found on the website. You may also want to check out the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. They have also published an article on this which may be found at http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/2014/06/09/digital-games-in-the-classroom-a-national-surevy/

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Collective Consumption: Social Media And Active Learning

Collective Consumption: Social Media And Active Learning | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"It comes as no surprise that the Internet grows exponentially by the minute, and in some cases by the second. It’s too late to turn back the clock, and it’s no wonder that our learners view school regulations of social media archaic and restrictive. We see the weekly chats with frustrated teachers who try to get colleagues to see the benefits of Twitter; yet this is not even the most popular media with our tweens, let alone young people under thirty."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 11, 2014 9:45 PM

Students use social media. Do they know how much social media is used (and do teachers know this information)? This post shares two great websites that provide data on how social media is being used today. Both are interactive, but in very different ways.

The Internet in Real Time provides an up to the second look at 23 social media tools, letting you see how quickly data is generated and you can also see "the real-time accumulation of wealth."

The second resource is an infographic Social Media 2014which looks at ten social media websites and provides "facts, figures, numbers and statistics from 2014." A few are below:

* 23% of teens consider Instagram their favorite social network.

* 100 hours of video is uploaded on YouTube every minute.

Given this data many of us may be questioning policies at our schools. Is it time for public schools to look at how social media is being used by their students when they are outside the walls of the school and understand that social media provides a platform that we could use to deliver lessons?

This post explores this issue and the final sentence reads "The collective consumption of knowledge has changed because of technology, and learners need to be able to use it, search it, and share it." What are your thoughts on this?

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11 Bad Teaching Habits That Are Stifling Your Growth

11 Bad Teaching Habits That Are Stifling Your Growth | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"There’s a certain class of mistakes that all educators can eliminate with conscious effort, and in this post we outline 11 of them. They range from habits of practice to habits of thought, but all of them have one important thing in common: they make your job harder."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 13, 2014 10:26 PM

For many of us this school year has come to an end or will shortly. Perhaps it is time to reflect on our year and consider habits that might need to be changed. This post looks at 11 habits. A few are listed below.

* Not learning from colleagues. This seems simple, but given how busy our day is it is tough to find time to observe another teacher, or have someone tape you and ask others to provide you with feedback.

* Assuming a lesson taught is a lesson learned. Have you asked yourself how many times you have repeated a portion of a lesson? With the range of students in our classrooms the need to rephrase, review, reteach key points may be more necessary than we think.
* Failing to establish relevance. At times this may seem difficult to do, but for our students to learn we need to make our topic relevant to them. When you are successful with this share your ideas with others!
Click through to the post to see 8 additional habits that you may want to change.
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 14, 2014 11:15 AM

#11 - Not getting to know your students. I think this is the most important tip -- but they're all good. 

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10 Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment

10 Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Wherever we are, we’d all like to think our classrooms are “intellectually active” places. Progressive learning (like our 21st Century Model, for example) environments. Highly effective and conducive to student-centered learning. But what does that mean?

The reality is, there is no single answer because teaching and learning are awkward to consider as single events or individual 'things'..."


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Henrietta Marcella Paz-Amor's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:15 AM

What are the characteristics of an effective learning environment? Read on...

Ruby Day's curator insight, June 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These criteria really outline some solid  principles that should direct our planning and thus be evident in our learning environments. Principles such as: student enquiry, work readiness, personalised learning, flexibility, authentic and transparent assessment. I like the focus on critical thinking here :)

Sue Alexander's curator insight, June 21, 2014 5:02 PM

Great scoop Beth. I love the goal of "intellectually active" classrooms.

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Can Exercise Close the Achievement Gap?

Can Exercise Close the Achievement Gap? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Just 12 minutes of aerobic exercise can boost low-income college students’ academic performance. The effect is large enough to close the achievement gap.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:51 PM

In 2012 a study was published that noted there were academic benefits for low-income who had "short bursts of aerobic exercise. This article shares a new study where participants age 17 - 21 were placed in groups (based on income level) and assigned to either the experimental group or the control group. The experimental group jogged for 12 minutes while the control group watched a video on the benefits of exercise. And yes, these students also saw a significant increase in academic performance. For more information click through to the article.

Progressive training's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:30 AM

Can Exercise Close the Achievement Gap?

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10 Ways To Be A More Reflective Teacher

10 Ways To Be A More Reflective Teacher | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

 

"Teaching isn’t easy.

It will challenge your content knowledge, pedagogical skills, charisma, diplomacy, communication, statistical analysis skills, and a dozen other strands you didn’t know where strands. Some teachers may try to tell you that being happy doesn’t matter. That it’s about results. Data. Performance. Or more rhetorically, the students."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:44 PM

How can we become better teachers? One way is to reflect on our practice. There are times when we team teach or collaborate, but for most teachers our days are spent in our classroom with our students. This post provides 10 great suggestions on ways to reflect on your teaching. Below are a few of the ideas.

* Record video of your lessons (and then share the video with colleagues and have them provide feedback also).

* Ask the students for feedback (this may be a bit scary, but chances are they will have some insights that would assist you)

* Surround yourself with enthusiasm & possibility (all too often we see the negative...try going in the opposite direction and see what happens.

Seven additional ideas are found in this post. Check it out and make some notes for what you might try next year.

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What Happens in One Minute Online? New Infographic

What Happens in One Minute Online? New Infographic | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Sixty seconds seems like an insignificant amount of time, but when you look at it in terms of how much data is created, there’s a whole lot going on. Almost two years ago, we created an infographic to highlight just how much digital data was generated every minute. The numbers were staggering. Recently, we decided …"


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 4, 2014 7:00 PM

Check out this new infographic (published April 23, 2014) and learn what happens in one minute online. You can also see an infographic from a year ago (link in the post) and consider having students compare and contrast the two to find out what has changed.

Glenda Morris's curator insight, June 1, 2014 8:36 AM

What happens on the internet every minute of the day - great infographic 

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Iraq crisis: Is it time for al-Maliki to step down?

Iraq crisis: Is it time for al-Maliki to step down? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
(CNN) - The U.S. handed him the keys to Iraq when it pulled out combat troops in 2011, and asked him not to scratch it.

But Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has since lost control of a wide swath of his country.
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EU plans bid to raise global rag trade working conditions

EU plans bid to raise global rag trade working conditions | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A year after the Rana Plaza building collapse that killed 1,135 people in Bangladesh, the European Commission is mulling a new initiative to boost labour standards for global companies that supply Europe’s high streets, as a flagship for Europe's ...
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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2014 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 2014 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Iraq's Current Devolution

"A radical fringe Islamic group names ISIS is fighting to establish a extremist Islamic state in Iraq and Syria...and beyond. They control eastern Syria, western Iraq, just took control of Iraq's 2nd largest city of Mosul and are advancing on the capital Baghdad.  In this podcast, the professor John Boyer outlines just a few of the contributing factors to why this significant event is taking place, the geographic/historic background of the state, and the consequences for the future of the region."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2014 8:41 AM

If you haven't yet discovered John Boyer, a.k.a. the Plaid Avenger,  I recommend exploring his site.  He has numerous resources for world regional geography and current global affairs.  His colorful persona is highly entertaining for college age-students as his class attracts over 3,000 students each semester (you can decide for yourself whether that personality works for you and your classroom).  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on Iraq's current devolution and possible total collapse. 


Tags: SyriaIraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsborders, colonialism, devolution.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:27 PM

unit 4

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:04 PM

Iraq's position in regards to the militant groups has steadily affected the countries global and economic status in more ways than one. As these militant groups such as ISIS continue to grow then so will their territory and intensity of self-less acts. Not only are these groups a disease to the world but they affect the way our global economy works. ISIS controls oil fields and vast amounts of land in Iraq, Syria and other middle-eastern countries. In my opinion, America's decision to fire airstrikes onto these militant groups could be both good and bad. Good because it will decrease the amount of ISIS members but bad because it could be an incentive for ISIS to cause further damage and chaos in reference to revenge. At this pace, ISIS and other such groups will gain claimed territory in which will come at the cost of innocent lives of women and children. They must be stopped before issues get worse.