NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
4.9K views | +0 today
Follow
NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from International Economics: Pre-U Economics
Scoop.it!

▶ Crunch time for gas-rich Mozambique - YouTube

Mozambique is one of the world's poorest countries, but the discovery of gas reserves off its coast could change that. The FT's Andrew England looks at the preparations for a commodities boom and what impact upcoming elections could have on investor sentiment.
 


Via Graham Watson
more...
Graham Watson's curator insight, June 16, 2014 3:16 PM

I love/hate this type of developmental clip. How many times have we heard this sort of thing about an LEDCs? But how many times have resources proved decisive in boosting development?

 

Think of reasons why nations suffer from a 'resource curse'. Does the term 'Dutch disease' mean anything to you. Remember, Paul Collier's "Bottom Billion" unequivocally states that natural resources are one of four factor that invariably contribute to sustained poverty.

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Discursive Power and People's Movements: Why Chávez's Re-election is Important for Africa: Hakima Abbas

Discursive Power and People's Movements: Why Chávez's Re-election is Important for Africa: Hakima Abbas | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Discursive Power and People’s Movements:

Why Chávez’s Re-election is Important for Africa

Hakima Abbas

 

On October 7, 2012 President Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías of Venezuela was re-elected defeating conservative rival Henrique Capriles Radonski. It will be President Chávez’s third term in office under the 1999 constitution and his fourth election as Venezuelan president since 1998. Chávez won a clear majority in elections that were heralded as fair, peaceful and democratic. A stunning 97% of the population (over 19 million people) registered to vote and 82% of those registered, voted.

 

While global media conglomerates sought to wash over Chávez’s comfortable victory, African political commentators largely remained silent on the same. In contrast, there continues to be deserved attention to the U.S presidential electoral debates, campaigns and outcomes given the significant power of U.S policy on the lived realities of the majority of people globally be it as a result of their foreign policy, wars, economic power (though waning), their domination of Bretton Woods institutions or the U.S clout in international arena from Rio to Doha. However, the ideological debate and differences between both major contending political parties in the U.S boil down to nuance. These nuances can reverberate quite distinctly both nationally and internationally depending on the centrism of the representatives of these parties. The current incumbent President is in fact a centrist in relation to foreign policy, having continued and even extended the oil wars and the unflinching U.S support for the Zionist project, and in particular in relation to Africa where the militarism seems the order of the day. Indeed, President Obama’s domestic and international centrism has drawn much criticism but, with the hope that he embodies, miraculous transformation is still expected of him upon re-election.

 

On the other hand, at superficial reading, Venezuela appears to be an insignificant actor in Africa’s geo-political landscape. While a large overseas development donor, Venezuela’s aid, importantly framed as solidarity, is largely targeted at neighboring Latin American and Caribbean countries with much less significant contribution to Africa. That as it may be, Chávez was the first president of Latin America to declare himself of African descent, as important symbolically for Venezuela’s often marginalized population of African descent (who make up an estimated 34% of the population) and the entire region’s Afro-American community as Obama’s victory was for African-Americans in the United States. In an interview with Democracy Now in 2005, President Chávez reaffirmed the importance of these historic ties to the continent, stating: “And one of the greatest motherlands of all is no doubt, Africa. We love Africa. And every day we are much more aware of the roots we have in Africa. (....) Racism is very characteristic of imperialism. Racism is very characteristic of capitalism.” (Interview available at http://www.democracynow.org/2005/9/20/venezuelas_president_chavez_offers_cheap_oil).

 

Beyond the reaffirmation of historic connections, President Chávez has invested energies in the recognition of Africa as a strategic partner: over the years visiting countries never before visited by a Venezuelan president including South Africa, Mozambique, Algeria, Libya, Mali, Gambia, Benin and Angola. During his presidency, he has almost doubled the number of Venezuelan embassies in Africa and has entered into a number of agreements, which critically shift the monopoly of energy multinationals on the continent. Importantly in international forum, particularly at the United Nations, Chávez has recognized the importance of alliance with Africa and the potential clout of Africa bloc support.

 

However, during the oil price slump of 2008, Chávez drew criticism at home for not concentrating on internal Venezuelan affairs rather than drawing the wrath of imperialist states during long international speeches. He heeded this warning and cut back on international engagements and visits. However, maintained an important role in Latin American relations. His leadership of a significant power in the region created a domino effect and enabled the surfacing and victory of progressive parties from Ecuador to Argentina ending the decades of isolation of Cuba. Chávez has also been instrumental in creating and maintaining the alliance across South America (and to a lesser extent Meso-America and the Caribbean), which has enabled a weakening of North American clout and the building of alternative institutions, like Banco del Sur and the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of our America (ALBA), that capture the needs of the region and the will of its people.

 

Yet the key to the importance of President Chávez’s re-election for Africa lies strangely beyond Venezuela’s foreign policy and more so at the epicentre of its national struggle. The election in Venezuela stood in stark contrast to the campaigning in the U.S. The ideological differences between incumbent President Chávez and the opposition candidate Radonski is far from a nuance and instead represents clear ideological paths, values, interests, alliances and priorities. Their national policies are as distinct as their international allies. And the electorate of Venezuela has the choice within a strengthened democratized system to affirm not only a candidate but an ideological position. The fact is that Venezuelan people of all stripes are much more informed and actively engaged in the determination of their nation and peoples’ destiny than they have ever been before in modern times.

 

Far from superfluous, the international hyperbolic oration of President Chávez during his first term presented a critically Left voice that resonated globally with dormant forces including the peoples’ movements of Africa. The discursive power presented by Chávez’s leadership of an oil rich nation (therefore powerful in the energy dependent global North) cemented what is today a much needed voice in an otherwise frightening bipolarity of global discourse between, on the one hand imperialist neo-liberal powers in the Global North and, on the other, fundamentalist, conservative and populist forces of the Global South. With communism looking much more like capitalism and the economic inter-dependency of much of the world, the economic dominance of neo-liberalism was only hard shaken by the threat to accompanying infallibility of U.S. military dominance after September 11, 2001. The protracted War of Terror began. Indeed, last month, as the world drew up in flames of protest at the offensive depiction of Islam by a U.S based filmmaker, the narrative between neo-liberal and fundamentalist came again to the fore in a rabid display of the dominant political and ideological contest in the post-unipolar world.

 

Yet Chávez progressive discourse presents an alternative to both. Rabidly anti-imperialist but equally anti-conservative, Chávez offers, particularly to the peoples’ movements of Africa, a discourse that resounds on the streets of Guinea, the farms of Madagascar and the squares of Egypt. Indeed, the voice that has been most silenced after the massive acts of civil resistance in Tunisia and Egypt, are the progressive voices, neither Islamist nor militarized imperial puppet, seeking alternatives and long lasting solutions to the despair of post-independence African realities. From Zimbabwe to Kenya, Mali to South Africa, the quandary of false choices between the often populist rhetoric of anti-imperialism masking brutal fundamentalism on the one hand and the niceties of liberal rhetoric bellying the sustenance of subjugation on the other, leave little alternative space for African peoples’ to construct a vision and program of liberation for our times.

 

Chávez has been reluctant to criticise Global South leaders for any of their failings in leadership, understandably seeking allies amongst the few willing to openly oppose or resist the multiple layers of northern imperialism. However, with another six years to deepen the progressive agenda of not only Latin America and the Caribbean, but potentially the world, it will be critical that President Chávez and his administration consider supporting deepened solidarity between the peoples’ movements of Africa and the Americas to break the bipolarity of an increasingly belligerent world.

 


Via Firoze Manji
more...
Arabica Robusta's comment, October 28, 2012 7:05 AM
Is this an original article published on daraja.net? All the best.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from MyLuso News
Scoop.it!

Mozambique Must Learn The Lesson That Egypt Did Not - AFKInsider

Mozambique Must Learn The Lesson That Egypt Did Not - AFKInsider | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
postzambia.com Mozambique Must Learn The Lesson That Egypt Did Not AFKInsider While Mozambique, since its first multi-party elections in 1994, has been largely peaceful and, despite FRELIMO dominance at the polls, opposition parties have worked...

Via MyLuso
more...
MyLuso's curator insight, August 24, 2014 2:02 AM

Good insight..

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from catastrophe risks
Scoop.it!

First ever African natural disaster insurance pool launched

The first ever African catastrophe insurance pool has been launched by the African Risk Capacity (ARC), a specialised agency set-up by the African Union to help member states become more resilient to extreme weather events and to protect food insecure populations, in light of climate change.

 

The ARC Agency has created a specialist hybrid mutual insurance company, ARC Insurance Company Limited (ARC Ltd), initially domiciled in Bermuda, to issue policies to a group of African governments, initially comprising Kenya, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger and Senegal. Germany and the United Kingdom contributed the initial capital and are also founding members of the mutual.

 

“The creation of the first ever African catastrophe insurance pool is a transformative moment in our efforts to take ownership and use aid more effectively. It is an unprecedented way of organising ourselves with our partners, with Africa taking the lead – taking our collective destiny into our own hands, rather than relying on the international community for bailouts,” said Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Chair of the ARC Agency Board and Nigeria’s Minister of Finance.

 

The aim of the ARC catastrophe insurance pool is to reduce African governments' reliance on external emergency aid. Currently international assistance is secured through an appeals system and then allocated on a largely ad hoc basis once a disaster strikes. Consequently, African governments affected by disasters can be forced to reallocate funds from essential development projects to crisis responses, exacerbating problems in other areas of their economies.

 

Kenya’s Cabinet Secretary for the National Treasury, Henry Rotich, affirmed, “Droughts undermine our hard-won development gains, just as Africa is beginning to realise its vast potential. ARC will help us build resilience among vulnerable populations, protect our agriculture investments, thereby increasing productivity, as well as promoting fiscal stability by preventing budget dislocation in a crisis.”

 

“I’m proud to have overseen the establishment of ARC Ltd, and am pleased to acknowledge the financial support of US $200 million by the UK and German governments through DFID and KfW respectively,” notes Chairman of the Company Board of Directors and former head of the International Finance Corporation, Dr. Lars Thunell.

 

“ARC Ltd’s insurance programme goes a step further than previous sovereign risk pools thanks to its close ties with ARC Agency. Through the development of contingency plans linked to rapid payouts under the parametric insurance policy, the benefits of ex ante sovereign risk financing will flow directly to the most affected food insecure populations.”

 

The parametric insurance policies issued this month by ARC Ltd will provide a total of ~US $135 million in drought insurance coverage tailored to the specific requirements of the insured countries. In addition to its own capital, ARC Ltd has secured US $55 million of capacity from the international reinsurance and weather risk markets in order to cover the risks it is taking on from the participating countries.

 

ARC Ltd utilises a new software application called Africa RiskView developed by the UN World Food Programme to estimate crop losses and drought response costs before a season begins and as it progresses, triggering insurance payouts at or before harvest time if the rains have been poor. ARC’s cost-benefit analysis estimates that spending one dollar on early intervention through ARC could reduce ultimate economic impact by as much as four and a half dollars.

 


Via Lee Coppack
more...
Lee Coppack's curator insight, May 15, 2014 10:13 AM

An important development.

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Human Interest
Scoop.it!

Race & Agri-Politics Clash in Zimbabwe: President Mugabe's new attack on white farmers

Race & Agri-Politics Clash in Zimbabwe: President Mugabe's new attack on white farmers | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
When Mugabe drove 4,000 productive white farmers off their land a decade ago it was a tragedy. Kicking out the last 150 seems like a sad farce. Let's hope that cooler heads prevail.

Via Mr. David Burton, Jukka Melaranta
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Change and ‘New’ Politics in Zimbabwe | Freedom House

Zimbabweans are showing the evidence of having been torn in all directions in the transitional period. They have been scarred by the party political wars since the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) from late 2000 onwards first posed an electoral challenge to the Zimbabwe African National Union‐ Patriotic Front (ZANU‐PF). Zimbabweans, as represented in this stratified‐random and nationally representative sample, are not sure it seems on what to believe and how to relate to political and economic circumstances. They veer between praises for economic conditions that have improved and condemnations of the Inclusive Government (IG) when they move to more general‐level assessments. They leap from great anticipation that the next election is the one that will bring more definitive change to their lives to concrete assessments that reveal more of their politically tormented sides. They proclaim that free and fair elections are in the offing, yet express similar levels of fear of electoral violence and intimidation than they had in the past. The 2012 survey results illuminate these complex, nuanced and evolving positions that Zimbabweans hold today.


Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from University of World Cultures and Traditions
Scoop.it!

President Mugabe’s Wife-Grace Mugabe is Awarded a PHD Two Months After Enrolment & She Says She Worked Hard for It…

President Mugabe’s Wife-Grace Mugabe is Awarded a PHD Two Months After Enrolment & She Says She Worked Hard for It… | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
I love Africa and don’t get me wrong; it is not for the green forest which does not exist anymore, but for such absurdity and high level of corruption whi

Via The Divine Prince
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from globserver africa
Scoop.it!

Offensive Against First Lady Exposed in Zimbabwe | glObserver Global Economics

Offensive Against First Lady Exposed in Zimbabwe | glObserver Global Economics | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
VICE President Dr Joice Mujuru's thesis is by presently in the University of Zimbabwe Library barely a month next she graduated with a Doctor of Philosophy degree along with 11 other graduands part them Initial Lady Dr Grace Mugabe.

Via Michael Malka
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Afrodizziak
Scoop.it!

University of Zimbabwe Graduate Chenjerai Hove Shames His Alma Mater for Awarding Grace Mugabe a Doctorate Degree

University of Zimbabwe Graduate Chenjerai Hove Shames His Alma Mater for Awarding Grace Mugabe a Doctorate Degree | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
  Zimbabwean author Chenjerai Hove, who lives in exile in Europe, has condemned the University of Zimbabwe for awarding Grace Mugabe, Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe’s second wife, with a doctorate degree after she was allegedly only enrolled as...

Via Susan Myburgh
Nevermore Sithole's insight:

Author Chenjerai Hove

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Digital Citizenship Week | Common Sense Media

Digital Citizenship Week | Common Sense Media | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Common Sense Media improves the lives of kids and families by providing independent reviews, age ratings, & other information about all types of media

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 2014 1:54 PM
Common Sense Media improves the lives of kids and families by providing independent reviews, age ratings, & other information about all types of media


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/


Scooped by Nevermore Sithole
Scoop.it!

Russia's fifth-generation fighter receives first sets of new electronic warfare system

Russia's fifth-generation fighter receives first sets of new electronic warfare system | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The unique air system increases fighter jet’s jamming resistance and damage tolerance, as well as neutralizes enemy’s signature control systems
Nevermore Sithole's insight:

Electronic warfare systems

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

The World as 100 People | Visual.ly

The World as 100 People | Visual.ly | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The World as 100 People. This idea has been around since 1990. This is my attempt at presenting the information.

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Ryan Rejaei's curator insight, October 20, 2014 8:41 PM

So interesting. And easy to understand the information

Armando's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:20 AM
The World as 100 People | Visual.ly
Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 23, 2014 3:54 PM

If you want to see a detailed breakdown and find out where the data came from, here you go: http://www.100people.org/statistics_detailed_statistics.php

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from globserver africa
Scoop.it!

Mozambique: CNE Urges Calm and Orderly Voting| glObserver Global Economics

Mozambique: CNE Urges Calm and Orderly Voting| glObserver Global Economics | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The chairperson of Mozambique's National Elections Commission (CNE), Abdul Carimo on Tuesday urged all registered voters to cast their ballots in Wednesday's general election “with a sense of patriotism, urbanity, and civic spirit, and in an environment of joy and discipline”.

Via Michael Malka
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Trade unions and social activism
Scoop.it!

'Crunch' vote underway in Mozambique

'Crunch' vote underway in Mozambique | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Elections are being held in Mozambique, with the governing Frelimo party facing a tough challenge from Renamo, its longstanding rival.

Via Leicester Worker
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Brainfriendly, motivating videos to learn English B1 B2 and over (European standard)
Scoop.it!

Secrets of African rivers: the link between rivers and global warming. Euronews - Video News + transcript in 12 languages

Secrets of African rivers:  the link between rivers and global warming. Euronews - Video News + transcript in 12 languages | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it


Going with the flow, euronews discovers the link between rivers and global warming, with the focus on Africa.“In this programme, we join a research expedition between the Zimbabwe and Zambia border. In many ways, the rivers on the African continent remain a mystery. Today, European scientists join forces with their African colleagues in search of answers on the role played by African rivers in the global climate,” says euronews science producer Denis Loctier.


Rivers naturally produce greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O), that contribute to global warming. Land use and vegetation patterns along the riverside influence river biochemistry. An international research project aims to improve our understanding of how the rivers in Africa work........A greater understanding would help countries like Zambia manage its water resources, responding more efficiently to growing demand.

Imasiku Nyambe, Professor of Geology at the University of Zambia, told us what is happening there: “.... And therefore it’s important to study, to know how much water we have, so that all these competing users could have a share of what they want.”


Scientists measure various water parameters, including its temperature, oxygen, pH, conductivity, and different carbon pools. This data will explain what portion of the carbon entering the river from the surrounding landscape with decomposed organic matter or soil minerals gets converted into gas or trapped into sediment, and how much is ultimately reaching the ocean.
“At this point, everything is more or less unknown. This is why we are here. We’re trying to look at the transport of carbon into the ocean, to the sedimentation processes, fluxes to the atmosphere. We’re looking at the source of carbon – we try to understand how much carbon in this river is terrestrial, how much is aquatic-produced,” said Christian Teodoru.

...... Similar field studies also take place in Kenya, Mozambique, Niger, Gabon, Madagascar and the Congo River basin. Measurements are taken at regular intervals along the whole length of Africa’s main rivers.

“We expect that the geochemical parameters, including carbon dioxide and oxygen, might change along the river stretch, influenced by landscape, by the hydrology. This is why we continue sampling the river downstream, down to the Indian ocean, the large number of sampling sites,” added Cristian.


Studying the secrets of African rivers will shed new light on biochemical mechanisms shaping our global climate, helping to secure a safer future for the people on the continent.


Find more information on the project website: http://ees.kuleuven.be/project/afrival/


More about: Africa, Environmental protection, Global warming and climate change, Science, Water resources, Zambia


Via Aulde de B
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from TunstallGeog - Global systems and global governance (AQA A-level Geography 3.2.1)
Scoop.it!

Mozambique heads to polls amid claims of Chinese landgrabs – in pictures

Mozambique heads to polls amid claims of Chinese landgrabs – in pictures | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Mozambique is holding elections on Wednesday, with the ruling Frelimo party having to defend itself against accusations of landgrabs

Via Ms N. Tunstall
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Conflict transformation, peacebuilding and security
Scoop.it!

The politics of reconciliation in Zimbabwe

The politics of reconciliation in Zimbabwe | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A ten-year delay in establishing the constitutionally-guaranteed National Peace and Reconciliation Commission (NPRC) raises profound questions about the commitment of Zimbabwe’s political elites to achieving justice and reconciliation.  Suggested...

Via CoPeSeNetwork
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Financial Inclusion
Scoop.it!

Grace Mugabes super-speedy PhD raises eyebrows around the world

Grace Mugabes super-speedy PhD raises eyebrows around the world | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The first lady of Zimbabwe is not known for her academic prowess yet she has been awarded a doctorate from the University of Zimbabwe. What more do we know of the woman opponents call DisGrace?

Via Amos Odero
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Trade unions and social activism
Scoop.it!

Grace Mugabe enters Zanu-PF politics

Grace Mugabe enters Zanu-PF politics | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

The wife of Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe has entered politics after being endorsed to become head of the ruling Zanu-PF party's women's league.


Via Leicester Worker
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Trending in Uganda
Scoop.it!

Birth of a Mugabe dynasty in Zimbabwe?

Birth of a Mugabe dynasty in Zimbabwe? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
With the political rise of President Robert Mugabe's wife Grace, the BBC's Andrew Harding considers if Zimbabwe is witnessing the birth of a dynasty.

Via Ugtrendz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Better Ways to Learn - NYTimes.com

Better Ways to Learn - NYTimes.com | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

For starters, long and focused study sessions may seem productive, but chances are you are spending most of your brainpower on trying to maintain your concentration for a long period of time. That doesn’t leave a lot of brain energy for learning.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
DareDo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:26 AM

Beaucoup de bon sens et de choses connues. Néanmoins très utile à relire et intégrer...

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 15, 2014 7:54 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How Should Professional Development Change?

How Should Professional Development Change? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 2014 9:07 AM
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 18, 2014 7:05 PM

Without choice and voice, professional development might be training which is for seals and not human beings.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Teacher PD for the Digital Classroom: 6 Bold Ideas to Empower Educators

Teacher PD for the Digital Classroom: 6 Bold Ideas to Empower Educators | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Training and support for teachers on the effective use of educational technology is the key to enhancing learning in the connected classroom. That was the clear message from a recent one-day working summit in Washington, D.C., where some of the nation's top educators, edtech advocates, and policy...


1. Allocate More Time for Professional Development


2. Reimagine the Ecosystem and the Offerings


3. Move from 20th- to 21st-Century Training


4. Change the School Culture


5. Redefine Leadership


6. Create Meaningful Mentorship Opportunities
Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:42 PM
Training and support for teachers on the effective use of educational technology is the key to enhancing learning in the connected classroom. That was the clear message from a recent one-day working summit in Washington, D.C., where some of the nation's top educators, edtech advocates, and policy...


1. Allocate More Time for Professional Development


2. Reimagine the Ecosystem and the Offerings


3. Move from 20th- to 21st-Century Training


4. Change the School Culture


Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Psychology of Getting Unstuck: How to Overcome the “OK Plateau” of Performance & Personal Growth

The Psychology of Getting Unstuck: How to Overcome the “OK Plateau” of Performance & Personal Growth | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Something experts in all fields tend to do when they’re practicing is to operate outside of their comfort zone and study themselves failing. The best figure skaters in the world spend more of their practice time practicing jumps that they don’t land than lesser figure skaters do. The same is true of musicians. When most musicians sit down to practice, they play the parts of pieces that they’re good at. Of course they do: it’s fun to succeed. But expert musicians tend to focus on the parts that are hard, the parts they haven’t yet mastered. The way to get better at a skill is to force yourself to practice just beyond your limits.

Via Gust MEES
more...
Chris Carter's curator insight, October 20, 2014 8:04 PM

This is growth mindset. Failure as iteration. Wonderful!

Miguel Herrera E.'s curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:55 AM

El secreto es practicar hasta superar los propios limites, auto impuestos  muy frecuentemente.

Audrey's curator insight, October 22, 2014 4:13 PM

Sounds like good advice.  Effective tutors always push learners.  

Audrey curating for http:/www./homeschoolsource.co.uk