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10 African Countries With the Highest Military Strength and Fire Power

10 African Countries With the Highest Military Strength and Fire Power | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
African countries with the highest military strength, African countries with the highest military power, list of African countries with highest military strength
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Japan's Disappearing Villages

Japan's Disappearing Villages | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
In the small town of Nagoro, population 35, one woman is trying to save her village from extinction by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 3:53 PM

Okay very creepy but the woman trying to save her village from extinction due to  urban migration. It kind of reminds of me a Native American tribe in a similar fashion because it shows the power and history of the village and the connection it has with her. So by creating life sized dolls for the people who either died or moved away kind of creates a certain spirit of that person in whom stays behind with her, leaving the village the same, even if its actually not their physically but spiritually the tradition of their place still remains and the history would continue to live on very deep and interesting.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:13 PM

I was both slightly creeped out by this article, as well as moved by it.  Urbanization has been increasingly going on in Japan.  In fact, when I think of the country, I think of the hustle and crowds of Tokyo.  Another factor playing into Japan's villages disappearing is that the birth rates in Japan are very low, in fact the country is losing population due to the fact that more people are dying than being born.  Viewing this town, it was pretty sad to see the dolls recreating scenes that living people once did in this town.  It is also eery because these dolls stay in the same position doing the same thing forever, it is kind of like a museum of what life was once like in a dying town.  It must be a hard thing to see happening to a place where one's family have lived for generations. 

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:43 PM

Due to urban migration, this village of Nagoro is said to be one of 10,000 small towns that will disappear in Japan.  I've been to some small towns in Japan and can say there is so much more culture in these villages than there is in the big cities.  I got a totally different feeling in my sole than when I ended my trip in Tokyo.  While both parts of the country have its pros and cons, it is terrible to think that these villages will be defeated to the rise of urbanism.   

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Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

Via Seth Dixon
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BEAULIEU ADRIEN's curator insight, March 26, 5:53 AM

Comprenez la différence entre sunnites et shiites facilement grace à cet article;

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:17 PM

 A nice little quiz that tests your knowledge on Sunni and Shia Islam.  I myself scored a 69 so there is much to learn for me on the differences between the 2.  The Shia are thought of as the more extreme of the two sects, so I was shocked to see that Hussein and Bin Ladin were both Sunni.  The complications between these two are important to know about as they are making headlines in world news.  Its tough to understand these people when you know nothing about their history.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 10:19 PM

After taking this class about Political Islam I thought I knew about Sunni and Shiite Islam.  Taking this quiz I definitely mixed up a lot of the information.  It seems like it would be simple to understand the differences and the similarities, but they are so parallel its easy to get the information mixed up.  

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Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire

Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Animated GIF map chronicling the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire." 


Tags: empire, devolution, Middle East, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, April 3, 9:48 AM

añada su visión ...

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 7, 9:08 PM

It was amazing to see the start of the Ottoman empire and the rise over a couple of hundred years.  Then you see the green recede and its amazing it shrinks down to nothing.  All you have left is Turkey.  Once a prosperous empire, it no longer exists.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 12:25 PM

This GIF map was particularly interesting to me as a history major and as someone who strongly believes in the importance of incorporating geography into history whenever possible. Though my knowledge about the Ottoman Empire is admittedly lacking, it was still interesting to see the changes that occurred in the empire's borders over six centuries. Some time frames saw significant land gains, others significant losses, and still others small shifts. Someone more well-versed in the history of the Ottoman Empire than I would be able to tell exactly what these changes coincided with, but I knew that the timeline would end shortly after WWI, since that was the undoing of many European/Eurasian empires, including the Ottomans. 

 

What this map best illustrates is the fluidity of borders. Here is an empire that existed for more than 600 years, and its borders changed numerous times throughout its history. While this likely occurred as a result of armed conflict, it is still a major change. Often, people think of borders as concrete and unmoving. This is not the case at all, as borders can shift due to war, treaties, or even natural, geographical change. A GIF map like this is useful and interesting because it shows easily and chronologically the change in borders of a particular nation or empire over the course of its history. Furthermore, it allows the viewer to ponder the implications of the border shifts and how they would have affected politics, economics, and culture at the time. 

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Political Polarization in the American Public

Political Polarization in the American Public | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan antipathy is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in recent history. And these trends manifest themselves in myriad ways, both in politics and in everyday life.


A decade ago, the public was less ideologically consistent than it is today. In 2004, only about one-in-ten Americans were uniformly liberal or conservative across most values. Today, the share who are ideologically consistent has doubled: 21% express either consistently liberal or conservative opinions across a range of issues – the size and scope of government, the environment, foreign policy and many others.


Tags: political, statistics, regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 7:57 AM

The right-wing ideology is worldwide, years of racist colonial acculturation, sexist and neoliberal social inequality. The culture industry was filled to disclose these conceptions.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 8:14 PM

Unit 6

A decade ago, the public was less ideologically consistent than it is today. In 2004, only about one-in-ten Americans were uniformly liberal or conservative across most values. Today, the share who are ideologically consistent has doubled: 21% express either consistently liberal or conservative opinions across a range of issues – the size and scope of government, the environment, foreign policy and many others.

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Syria: Rebels’ Car Bombs, Rockets Kill Civilians | Human Rights Watch

Syria: Rebels’ Car Bombs, Rockets Kill Civilians | Human Rights Watch | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
(New York) – Opposition armed groups in Syria have indiscriminately attacked civilians in government-held territory with car bombs, mortars, and rockets, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today.
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What the President said on 21 March… - New Era

What the President said on 21 March… - New Era | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
New Era
What the President said on 21 March…
New Era
Fellow Namibians, the main priority for the next administration will be addressing the socio-economic gaps that exist in our society.
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Presidential Speech, Namibia

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Pakistan: ‘Media and information literacy empower people to build collective consciousness of society’ | TwoCircles.net

Pakistan: ‘Media and information literacy empower people to build collective consciousness of society’ | TwoCircles.net | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Pakistan: ‘Media and information literacy empower people to build collective consciousness… http://t.co/shF0STRJmf
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Zimbabwe: Zanu-PF and Nationalism

Zimbabwe: Zanu-PF and Nationalism | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Our past must be used as a means to integrate our history into character and personality for today's people. How does anyone bragging of a heroic liberation history get involved in corruption without making a perfect fool of himself?
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Evidence-informed policy making brings challenges and opportunities in Zimbabwe

Evidence-informed policy making brings challenges and opportunities in Zimbabwe | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
INASP's new Programme Manager for EIPM reflects on two VakaYiko pilot trainings recently in Harare led by ZeipNET
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Evidence-informed policy in Zimbabwe

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Five reasons Ottawa shouldn't extend Iraq mission - Toronto Star

Five reasons Ottawa shouldn't extend Iraq mission - Toronto Star | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Joining the bombing, training and special operations mission in Iraq was unnecessary; continuing and expanding it will compound the costs.
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Is the European Medical Cannabis Movement Gaining in Power?

Is the European Medical Cannabis Movement Gaining in Power? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Physicians from various countries and specialisations, pharmacists, activists and patients, met between March 4th and 7th at the international Medical Cannabis Conference in Prague.
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Trends in the frequency and intensity of floods across the central United States

Trends in the frequency and intensity of floods across the central United States | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
2015 study from the University of Iowa published in Nature Climate Change examining long-term trends in the frequency and intensity of flood events in the central United States.
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10 African Countries With the Highest Military Strength and Fire Power

10 African Countries With the Highest Military Strength and Fire Power | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
African countries with the highest military strength, African countries with the highest military power, list of African countries with highest military strength
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What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 7:11 PM

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Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

This was an interesting read because I was not too familiar with this dispute. Three leaders have officially signed a deal to end a long dispute over sharing the Nile waters and beginning to build Africa's largest hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia. The three leaders are from Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt and signed the agreement in Sudan's capital city. Many feared that previous Dam's would worsen the water supply but this new Dam will give a more fairer share for everyone. These leaders assured that this new Dam will not cause any harm to the downstream countries but this project is still a ooncern for Egypt. The nile is the only source of water for some. Ethiopia has stated the the river will be diverted a little but will still follow it's natural course. Ethiopia is being backed up by many other countries as well.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

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Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
London to New York City by car? It could happen if the head of Russian Railways has his way.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 12:37 PM

One of the major and controversial issues facing the world today is globalization. Russia has traditionally defined itself as anti-western. Combining these two parts of the world could create a much smaller world and the further fuel the globalization monster. By connecting the world in this way, New York, Fairbanks, Moscow, and London will be more linked. However, Africa and Asia are left out of the "loop." Globalization has its victims, and in this case it would be Asia and Africa. On the more positive side, this newfound intimacy between the "Western World" and Russia could help ease relations between the two entities. In the long run, this project will benefit the world as a whole. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 5:22 PM

I personally think that a superhighway would be an awesome idea however I can see the means for protests in citizens across the globe

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 10:43 PM

Unit 1 Geography Nature and Perspectives

      The proposed superhighway from Europe to the US through Russia is a fascinating idea and displays how interconnected our world has become through globalization. The article describes how head of Russian Railways proposed a possible transcontinental highway spanning three continents and 20,77 km (12,910 miles). Though many specifics haven't been laid out, the thought of such a highway is certainly intriguing. 

       Globalization has become widespread throughout our world and through time space compression the world has become very interconnected with improved transportation, communications, and technologies. With the global economy expanding such a highway could prove advantageous to many key countries and global superpowers such as the United States, Russia, UK, Canada and many other European countries. A superhighway as such is definitely possible in our world and is a realistic idea that may actually be executed one day.

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Nigeria: At Least 1,000 Civilians Dead Since January | Human Rights Watch

Nigeria: At Least 1,000 Civilians Dead Since January | Human Rights Watch | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
(Abuja) – Attacks by the Islamist armed group Boko Haram killed more than 1,000 civilians in 2015, based on witness accounts and an analysis of media reports.
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2015 challenges: urbanisation

2015 challenges: urbanisation | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Increasing urban populations put a strain on resources and leave many on the fringes of society. What can NGOs do to give them a voice?
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SA media freedom has slipped rank from 24 to 39. What has happened?

SA media freedom has slipped rank from 24 to 39. What has happened? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
SA’s media freedom is ranked 39th out of 171 countries, just behind the UK (34th) and ahead of the USA (49th). Ten years ago we ranked 24th
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Politics and Mindsets in Poor Rural Communities - Yale Press Log

Politics and Mindsets in Poor Rural Communities - Yale Press Log | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Mil Duncan explains the ways politics, education, activism, regional history, and personal expectation affect the development of poor rural communities.
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Zim crisis: A case for a new value system - New Zimbabwe.com

Zim crisis: A case for a new value system - New Zimbabwe.com | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
New Zimbabwe.com
Zim crisis: A case for a new value system
New Zimbabwe.com
For the July 2013 elections, held after the expiry of the fractious GNU, Mugabe's strategy had to be different.
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The mixed blessing of Asia's growing middle class - East Asia Forum

The mixed blessing of Asia's growing middle class - East Asia Forum | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Author: Adrian C. Hayes, ANU Everybody seems excited about the rise of a new, global middle class — especially in Asia. A report from Deutsche Bank states
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After Mugabe: What’s next for Zimbabwe’s “guided democracy”

After Mugabe: What’s next for Zimbabwe’s “guided democracy” | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
By Stephen Jaber Zimbabwe’s President, Robert Mugabe, celebrated his 91st birthday on March 1st, 2015. Starting his 91st year off in decadent fashion, the President treated his guests to an absurd ...
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These two states had the same basic information about fracking. They made very different decisions

These two states had the same basic information about fracking. They made very different decisions | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
New York banned fracking not because of science – but because of its absence.

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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