NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor

Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure that captures the level of income distribution in a given area, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 20 metropolitan areas with the most uneven income distribution, or the highest Gini coefficients. A Gini coefficient of 1 means all income belongs to a single individual, while a coefficient of 0 reflects a perfectly even distribution. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, metro area leads the nation with the worst income distribution.With only a few exceptions, the metro areas with the widest gaps between rich and poor residents tend to have lower median household incomes. The majority of the 20 metro areas with the highest Gini coefficients have median household incomes more than $10,000 below the national median of $52,250.Average incomes, however, tell a different story. Because of the uneven income distribution, the average income is much higher in most of these metro areas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 2015 8:48 AM

The Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit in 2013).  This article explains the value of the Gini coefficient without delving much into the statistics.  


Tagsstatistics, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic, development, economic.

Chelsea Martines's curator insight, August 29, 2015 2:21 PM

The article discusses the gaps between high income families and low income families in cities. This is mesured by what is called Gini coefficient and look so at a city's amount of poverty and wealthy people. The average income of a city is different and does not tell the imbalance between the high and low income families. It makes a city with a big divider in the two extremes not noticeable because ito makes the city look all around wealthy because of the weight of the higher income people. The Gini coefficient is different and shows that either there is a large majority of families that are wealthy in a city or of low income. Statistics for this have risen over the past decade dramatically since 2007. 

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

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Democratic Republic of Congo

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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:09 PM

Its all about greed. If people only had the respect for each other then with all the natural resources on earth we all could live comfortably.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:40 PM

It's a shame to know that there's a country of hopelessness out there with a potential to be a great one. The long term causes of colonialism had a huge impact on their development as a modern country. They were once a great empire but was diminished down to nothing by the European. Hopefully there will light to the darkness of Congo in the near future.

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Unfolding Truth: Dismantling the World Bank's Myths on Agriculture and Development (PDF)

Unfolding Truth: Dismantling the World Bank's Myths on Agriculture and Development (PDF) | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
In the 1980s and 1990s, the World Bank and International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) intervention in developing countries’ national policies, through aid conditionality and austerity programs known as Structural Adjustments Programs (SAPs), triggered a wave of global resistance against the International Financial Institutions (IFIs). in the face of growing criticism that these policies increased poverty, debt, and dependency on rich countries, saps were eventually withdrawn in 2002; however the World Bank, through renewed means, continues to pursue and impose its neoliberal agenda on the developing world.

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jon inge's curator insight, October 7, 2014 4:29 AM

market based solutions don't help the very poorest 

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Damning report reveals UK's shocking levels of poverty

Damning report reveals UK's shocking levels of poverty | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"The largest ever study of poverty and deprivation in the UK has revealed that the country's poverty levels are soaring"


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ESRC's curator insight, June 20, 2014 5:38 AM

Article on the latest findings from the ESRC-funded Poverty and Social Exclusion programme.

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Teaching Through Trauma: How 1 LA school teaches despite poverty, trauma

Teaching Through Trauma: How 1 LA school teaches despite poverty, trauma | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
In this first installment of a KPCC series, we look at new research that shows the mere act of being poor can affect the brain, making it hard for kids to learn. But the changes are reversible.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:16 PM

How does poverty impact our students, especially students whom live in urban areas where trauma and stress have a significant impact on the developing brain?

Quoting from the post "Children living in poor neighborhoods are more likely to suffer traumatic incidents, like witnessing or being the victims of shootings, parental neglect or abuse. They also struggle with pernicious daily stressors, including food or housing insecurity, overcrowding and overworked or underemployed, stressed-out parents."

Yet it is possible to make a difference, and one school in Los Angeles is proving this with by working with teachers with this goal in mind "...to figure out how to “use positivity and relationships to reverse some of the negative effects of poverty.”

This link will take you to part 1 of this story and the link to part 2 is available in the story. You may also listen to each installment.

Henrietta Marcella Paz-Amor's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:13 AM

How does being poor potentially affect the brain and learning for kids? How one LA school teaches through trauma..

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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

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Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

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Atlas of African agriculture research and development: Revealing agriculture's place in Africa | IFPRI Publication

Atlas of African agriculture research and development: Revealing agriculture's place in Africa | IFPRI Publication | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

The Atlas of African Agriculture Research & Development is a multifaceted resource that high­lights the ubiquitous nature of smallholder agriculture in Africa; the many factors shaping the location, nature, and performance of agricultural enterprises; and the strong interde­pendencies among farming, natural resource stocks and flows, rural infrastructure, and the well-being of the poor.


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Revisiting wage subsidies: How pro-poor is a South African wage subsidy likely to be? | Development Southern Africa


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Revisiting wage subsidies in South Africa
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IFPRIKM's curator insight, January 28, 2014 8:56 AM

Wage subsidies have been used in both developed and developing countries to raise employment. After a decade of deliberation, the South African Government recently announced the introduction of a wage subsidy scheme. Given the intrinsic link between unemployment and poverty in South Africa, the belief is that a wage subsidy programme sufficient in scope will also make inroads into poverty. However, the way in which jobs are distributed among poor and non-poor jobseekers is crucial. Our general equilibrium microsimulation model confirms the expectation that a higher wage elasticity of labour demand is associated with larger reductions in poverty. We also find that a greater proportion of new jobs accrue to poor jobseekers when the elasticity is high. While youth-targeting does not improve the poverty-reducing effect of the policy, sectors such as textiles, accommodation, and construction services with their pro-poor employment profiles are good candidates for targeting.

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Capital to the world's poorest countries - The Economist

Capital to the world's poorest countries - The Economist | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
DESPITE the effects of the global financial crisis, remittances to the world's 48 least developed countries (LDCs) have continued rising, reaching $27 billion in 2011, according to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. The rise partly reflects the greater number of emigrants from LDCs (perhaps now as many as 27m), but also the fact that better data is being reported by more countries.

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NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty

NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Brazil, Russia, India and China are profoundly shaking up the G8. All of these newcomers give aid to developing countries. And yet some still receive substantial aid themselves from the U.S. and other donors.

 

This seems to be a is a strange juxtaposition: surging countries in the global economy are also recipients of international aid from NGOs.  Too often we view the country as though that is the logical scale at which to discuss all issues such as economic growth and poverty.  Too often we view the border as though all things within the border are homogenous and difference lies on the other side of the border.  The author of this article argues that the future for NGOs is increasing collaboration and partnerships with the private sector to lead to a 'convergence' between the economic aims of the local economy and the humanitarian goals of the NGOs.


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Brianna S.'s comment, August 27, 2012 11:17 AM
I find that this article interestingly explains how NGOs are becoming more prevalent in both private and public sectors, especially as the BRIC nations continue to move up in GDP and economic prosperity. However, countries such as China and Russia are not exactly welcoming NGOs with open arms. It begs the question of whether or not these communistic countries are willing to adapt their hostilities toward international private aid, especially considering large amounts of their own citizens continue to live in poverty.
Niu Zi Bin's curator insight, January 17, 2013 1:20 AM

wow

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Why Poverty is Always the Issue in Education - YouTube

After our interview with Dana Goldstein, we discuss why poverty is always the issue in education… Watch our interview with Dana Goldstein on The Teacher Wars...

Via Sharrock, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Dean J. Fusto
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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


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analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:10 PM

unit 3 or 6

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

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Food security and public distribution system in India | Agricultural Research


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IFPRIKM's curator insight, July 23, 2014 4:31 PM

This study was conducted to assess the temporal changes in the status of food security in India. The food security was assessed in terms of its basic pillars—availability access and absorption. Findings reveal that though there has been a remarkable improvement in the status of food security in India, the presence of food insecurity on a large scale erodes the large chunk of sheen from the glory of economic development in India. Several initiatives have been taken to tackle the challenge of food security, and the public distribution system (PDS) has been the most important instrument of ensuring food security in India. It has been observed that its contribution to poverty reduction and food security improvement has been increasing over time.

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Can Exercise Close the Achievement Gap?

Can Exercise Close the Achievement Gap? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Just 12 minutes of aerobic exercise can boost low-income college students’ academic performance. The effect is large enough to close the achievement gap.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:51 PM

In 2012 a study was published that noted there were academic benefits for low-income who had "short bursts of aerobic exercise. This article shares a new study where participants age 17 - 21 were placed in groups (based on income level) and assigned to either the experimental group or the control group. The experimental group jogged for 12 minutes while the control group watched a video on the benefits of exercise. And yes, these students also saw a significant increase in academic performance. For more information click through to the article.

Progressive training's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:30 AM

Can Exercise Close the Achievement Gap?

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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Government accused of a ‘Whitehall whitewash’ over food poverty report

Government accused of a ‘Whitehall whitewash’ over food poverty report | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Britain’s largest union, Unite accused the government of a ‘Whitehall whitewash’ and trying to bury bad news following today’s (Thursday 20 February) publication of a report into food poverty for the Department for Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).


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Tanzania. East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis | IFPRI

Tanzania. East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis | IFPRI | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis | IFPRI

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IFPRIKM's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:24 AM

The second of three books in IFPRI's climate change in Africa series, East African Agriculture and Climate Change: A Comprehensive Analysis examines the food security threats facing 10 of the countries that make up east and central Africa - Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda - and explores how climate change will increase the efforts needed to achieve sustainable food security throughout the region. East Africa's populations is expected to grow at least through mid-century. The region will also see income growth. Both will put increased pressure on the natural resources needed to produce food, and climate change makes the challenges greater. East Africa is already experiencing rising temperatures, shifting precipitation patterns, and increasing extreme events. Without attention to adaptation, the poor will suffer.

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Book Review: Representations of Global Poverty: Aid, Development and International NGOs

Book Review: Representations of Global Poverty: Aid, Development and International NGOs | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Through the efforts of increasingly media-aware NGOs, people in the west are bombarded with images of poverty and inequality in the developing world. Representations of Poverty is a comprehensive study of the communications and imagery used by international NGOs to represent the developing world. In this meticulously researched and original book, Nandita Dogra examines the full cycle of representation – integrating analyses of the public messages of international development NGOs in the UK with the views of their staff and audiences. Reviewed by Philip Goodwin.


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Natural resources and economic development

Natural resources and economic development | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
When will Sierra Leoneans be able to benefit from their own natural resources, instead of being cursed by them?

 

Sierra Leone is a country that has been 'blessed' with excellent natural resources, and remains in political chaos with one of the lowest HDI scores.  For a national economy, having abundant natural resources does not guarantee economic prosperity.  This is baffling to many that don't see the political and geographic context that shapes various economic sectors.  This is good a way to demonstrate that context.       


Via Seth Dixon
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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:01 PM

Even though thousands are fleeing the country in search of something better big buisness see the country as a land of opportunity, but to those that live there Sierra Leone’s natural resources have been a curse. A decade ago diamonds put the country into an 11 year civil war and it is about to happen again over a unique wood found deep in the forests. We tend to forget that the wars that tear countires apart arent always started by political issues but also by natural rescources.  

Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:52 PM

Thousands of Sierra Leoneans are fleeing the country in search of a better life. Corporations see the country as a land of opportunity, because of the rich resources. Diamonds put the country into a civil war. Now, wood is threatening to do the same thing. Natural resources can be more precious than anything else to some people. They are seen as worth fighting for.

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, January 12, 2015 10:18 AM

This article it gives good insight on how much natural resources come into play when deciding a countries Human Development Index (HDI). Sierra Leone has a surplus amount of natural resources yet they still have one of the lowest HDI scores. The economy in Sierra Leone is definitely in bad shape. Because of the treacherous economy, the amount of natural resources is not very beneficial to their HDI.  

                                                                                                          S.S.