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How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies

How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 2014 9:30 AM

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 


Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


Sharrock's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:05 PM

Seth Dixon's insight:

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as cansatellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

 

Michael Meller's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:34 PM

Cool

 

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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 2015 9:36 PM

It doesn't surprise me that the average person doesn't know his geography.  It shocks the hell out of me that a college would put themselves in a situation to look that stupid!  Do your research people.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:08 PM

This is another example of stereotyping taking its course through Africa.  Even though I am aware of the size and diversity of Africa, I was guilty of associating Ebola with the whole continent and not just the affected areas.  Same thing goes with the AIDS virus and other things, such as poverty.  Articles are great for people in other parts of the world to read to better educate them on the size and diversity of Africa and that there are many different ways of life in its 54 countries.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:44 AM

The Ebola epidemic over the last year put everyone in the world on high alert, not just those who lived in Sierra Leone and many countries in West Africa. It is important to understand how the virus spread so quickly and the advancements made to treat the virus. Geography played a big part of the spread of the virus. Because Africa, and the countries are far from modern medical technology, many non-profit organizations like Doctors without Borders were dispatched to those affected areas to help show and train physicians there the proper techniques on how to treat infected people with Ebola. That's why on the map one can see a far range of countries who treated infected people in facilities that were built to handle cases of Ebola.

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How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World

How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Breastfeeding can be a polarizing topic. Views vary not only from person to person, but also country to country, according to a new survey examining women's opinions on breastfeeding.

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Nevermore Sithole's insight:

How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World

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Mandy Burris's comment, October 3, 2014 3:00 AM
I think that it is very interesting that some of the opinions are universal while others clearly show the differences in the cultures the women belong in. Some women's greatest fear is embarrassment where others were more concerned about the possibility of pain. I seem to agree with most of the women in the US and the UK that it is perfectly natural and not something to be embarrassed about.
biggamevince's comment, October 3, 2014 6:53 PM
From the data in the article it looks like universally, breastfeeding is seen as a natural occurrence. I think it is more of a human nature behavior rather than a social norm. Therefore it is not as embarrassing in most countries. However in France, about half of the citizens would feel embarrassed if they breastfed in public. The other half feel fine with breastfeeding in public. What this article does not show is how this topic is viewed in Middle Eastern countries.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:04 AM

How women are treated is something that differs from culture to culture. This issue of breastfeeding reflects a few different issues that are present in society. First of all is the treatment of women and their control over their body.Secondly, child rearing norms and third public openness. 

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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, June 2, 2015 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 2014 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 2014 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon
Nevermore Sithole's insight:

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:37 PM

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:12 AM

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.

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Media and Culture--Perspective and Bias

"Religious scholar Reza Aslan took some serious issue on CNN Monday night with Bill Maher‘s commentary about Islamic violence and oppression. Maher ended his show last Friday by going after liberals for being silent about the violence and oppression that goes on in Muslim nations. Aslan said on CNN that Maher’s arguments are just very unsophisticated.  He said these 'facile arguments' might sound good, but not all Muslim nations are the same. Aslan explained that female mutilation is an African problem, not a Muslim one, and there are Muslim-majority nations where women are treated better and there are even female leaders."


Via Seth Dixon
Nevermore Sithole's insight:

Media and Culture--Perspective<wbr></wbr> and Bias

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 5:58 AM

The media plays a substantial role in enhancing stereotypes about Muslims. In order to simplify an issue, the media often lumps groups of people together and identifies them as sharing one set of beliefs. In a constant twenty four hour news environment ,nuance is often sacrificed for a quick ratings driven story. The media is often appealing to the lowest common denominator. The media should make a better effort to explain the differences between each Muslim nation. The Middle East is a complex area, and it deserves complex coverage.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:01 PM

This video is a clear insight on how the Media depicts the people from around the world. Reza Aslan set these tv anchors on CNN in its place after they proclaimed that all Muslim countries are the same, that all Muslims are the same. This information is false and is informing people from around the world about the Middle East region. The problem is not the countries, or the religions, the simple problem is the people who support terrorism from this region and believe in stronger violent attacks to prove that they are strong. ISIS and all the other rebel groups coming from these nations are the problem. One must understand, that there are people who are suffering from these rebel groups in there own homes that want nothing to do with it. Syrians are looking for a way out from the violence and corruption in these states. To say, all Muslims are a problem is a really big misconception to the culture to people watching these videos around the world. It is important that people like Reza Aslan speak up and educate and give the right facts on the media. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:33 PM

yes, some Muslim countries have been lead by women. how many woman governors have there been. Texas is the size of Iraq. scale matters, and if all Muslim countries were merged they would never elect a woman as their leader, if one even ran and survived. the us has at least let them run.

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10 Ways To Be A More Reflective Teacher

10 Ways To Be A More Reflective Teacher | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

 

"Teaching isn’t easy.

It will challenge your content knowledge, pedagogical skills, charisma, diplomacy, communication, statistical analysis skills, and a dozen other strands you didn’t know where strands. Some teachers may try to tell you that being happy doesn’t matter. That it’s about results. Data. Performance. Or more rhetorically, the students."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:44 PM

How can we become better teachers? One way is to reflect on our practice. There are times when we team teach or collaborate, but for most teachers our days are spent in our classroom with our students. This post provides 10 great suggestions on ways to reflect on your teaching. Below are a few of the ideas.

* Record video of your lessons (and then share the video with colleagues and have them provide feedback also).

* Ask the students for feedback (this may be a bit scary, but chances are they will have some insights that would assist you)

* Surround yourself with enthusiasm & possibility (all too often we see the negative...try going in the opposite direction and see what happens.

Seven additional ideas are found in this post. Check it out and make some notes for what you might try next year.

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.