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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 12:17 PM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, laborNigeria, podcast

Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 9:11 AM

unit 6

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


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Ben Ricchio's curator insight, February 24, 10:30 AM

Very cool

Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

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The World Is Becoming A Better Place

The World Is Becoming A Better Place | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"People who love to complain about how horrible everything is also love to point out that the world is always changing — and change is of course always horrible, because it destroys the way things used to be. It's easy to get depressed by all the 'everything is horrible' talk.  So it's nice to sometimes remind ourselves that some things — many things, in fact — are getting better all the time."


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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, January 22, 6:50 PM

This is something I knew to be true but felt distant towards because outlets like American news sources are always focused on the bad. Why is that? It seems American to be fearful and instill fear.

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:14 PM

Unit 6

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:19 AM

This video gives a fantastic view into a city with a huge population that now has access to large amounts of automobiles. These traffic jams are pandemic in cities like this across Asia as a whole. While this definitely is extremely chaotic one of the most amazing things is the fact no accidents occur during the video, which is better than can be said for many Rhode Island drivers.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

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Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

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Africa Next

Africa Next | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?


This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 


Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
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Corruption versus human development

Corruption versus human development | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Which countries/regions struggle the most with corruption in their political institutions?  Which countries/regions struggle with development?  Why does corruption seem to be correlated with development? 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:40 PM

It seems that New Zealand is the country to live in because it has less corruption. But one day the corruption will start and that would be the country no one would like to be living in. the United States is also a great place to live in but in certain areas. That goes for New Zealand also. But what I am curious why in other countries there is so much corruption in all these other countries like Congo and Afghanistan. Maybe that one day will change.

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Is it all over for Greece in the EU?

Robert Peston crunches the numbers as finance ministers meet for vital loan talks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 22, 9:58 PM

This audio clip shows how the Greek economic crisis is an issue on the national, regional, and global scales.  This BBC video and article also provide some nice context, asking the question, what would happen in Greece quits the Euro? 


Tags: Greece, Europe, supranationalism, currency, economic, podcast

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 28, 6:50 PM

If Greece decides to no longer be a part of the United Nations (UN), this will ultimately have a significant impact on Europe’s Union economy. The impact will affect not only Greece as country but also to all members of the UN. In addition to this enormous problem, it will be hard to keep together all countries if Greece goes because as we know certain countries as a Spain, Portugal, Italy and even France are also facing economic issues. Success depends largely on UN giving consent for the members of the organization. The downfall in this disagreement will weaken the economies of the European Union as a whole. On the other hand, cheap currency will create new opportunities and be beneficial for tourists.

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Why are the MINTcountries special?

Why are the MINTcountries special? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"In 2001 the world began talking about the Bric countries - Brazil, Russia, India and China - as potential powerhouses of the world economy. The term was coined by economist Jim O'Neill, who has now identified the 'MINT' countries - Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey - as emerging economic giants. Here he explains why."


Tags: Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey, economic, development.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:45 PM

The next generation will come with more country's developments and those could be the MINT countries which are, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey, their economy are increasing and are far more bigger than what it was in the 2003. That would be awesome to see all those countries with a developed economy. That will improve the lives of millions and specially Mexicans! Can't wait to see how it will turn out.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:05 PM

Mexico, along with the other countries in the MINT category, are developing countries that could one day become economic powerhouses.  Mexico, as noted in the article, is in a strong position to become an economic powerhouse, due to the fact that it is in between the United States and the developing countries to its south.  Mexico does face a battle however, as the country has been dominated by corruption for decades, yet the new president, who is young and energetic, is attempting to reform the system and put an end to the wide spread problem.  If Mexico can become a major economic powerhouse, it along with Canada and the United States, could from a strong North American Trio, originally envisioned when the NAFTA was signed into law, back in the 1990s. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 10:00 PM

The MINT countries aren't that surprising.  After China purchased some of the US debt, it really opened my eyes to who the new powerhouse is.  Mexico could certainly be another powerful country if they could get their act together.  It will be interesting to see the shifts taking place in the next 20 years.  

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Globalization in a Nutshell

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:19 AM

This video gives a fantastic view into a city with a huge population that now has access to large amounts of automobiles. These traffic jams are pandemic in cities like this across Asia as a whole. While this definitely is extremely chaotic one of the most amazing things is the fact no accidents occur during the video, which is better than can be said for many Rhode Island drivers.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty

NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Brazil, Russia, India and China are profoundly shaking up the G8. All of these newcomers give aid to developing countries. And yet some still receive substantial aid themselves from the U.S. and other donors.

 

This seems to be a is a strange juxtaposition: surging countries in the global economy are also recipients of international aid from NGOs.  Too often we view the country as though that is the logical scale at which to discuss all issues such as economic growth and poverty.  Too often we view the border as though all things within the border are homogenous and difference lies on the other side of the border.  The author of this article argues that the future for NGOs is increasing collaboration and partnerships with the private sector to lead to a 'convergence' between the economic aims of the local economy and the humanitarian goals of the NGOs.


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Brianna S.'s comment, August 27, 2012 11:17 AM
I find that this article interestingly explains how NGOs are becoming more prevalent in both private and public sectors, especially as the BRIC nations continue to move up in GDP and economic prosperity. However, countries such as China and Russia are not exactly welcoming NGOs with open arms. It begs the question of whether or not these communistic countries are willing to adapt their hostilities toward international private aid, especially considering large amounts of their own citizens continue to live in poverty.
Niu Zi Bin's curator insight, January 17, 2013 1:20 AM

wow