NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
3.9K views | +0 today
Follow
NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What are Lavakas?

What are Lavakas? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"The word lavaka means 'hole' or 'gully' in Malagasy, and it has become the accepted international term for the spectacular erosional features that characterize the highlands of Madagscar. Lavakas are gullies formed by groundwater flow, with steep or vertical sides and flat floors."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 3, 2015 1:44 PM

Lavakas are often seen as an ecological catastrophe since rapid deforestion leads to young, active lavakas that can silt up rice fields.  While obviously not desirable, these scars on a deforested landscape do offer a glimmer of hope as well. Some National Geographic explorers are finding that older, stabilized lavakas can become great agricultural pockets for rebuilding in these denuded communities.

 

Tags: Madagascar, erosion, environment adapt,  environmentecology, political ecology, Africa, National Geographic.

Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:09 PM

This article from williams.edu, titled What are Lavaka’s, focuses on just that. It describes that a lakava, meaning “hole or “gully” in Malagasy, are gullies found in Madagascar that are caused by erosion. They are found on slopes and generally at an altitude of roughly 1,000 feet. Lakavas form where there is a concentration of softer material that is susceptible to erosion and frequent earthquake activity. For communities near lakavas there can be severe consequences to be alongside these geographic features. The article explains that lakava erosion can “damage infrastructure, remove hillslope pasturage, and causes debris flows that devastates agricultural land in the valleys.” Lakavas and the destruction they can potentially cause reveal an important fact of class distinction: the rich get the good land and the poor get the infertile, uninhabitable, dangerous territories. 

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:44 PM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 2014 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos

Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"A herd of hippopotamuses once owned by the late Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar has been taking over the countryside near his former ranch - and no-one quite knows what to do with them."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 26, 2014 10:33 PM

An important idea in biogeography is the concept of invasive species. An invasive species is an organism that is not indigenous to an area but causes great economic or environmental harm to the new area as it quickly adapts and alters the ecosystem.   Colombia's hippopotamus herd certainly qualifies as an interesting example to share with students of unintended ecological consequences that occur through human and environmental interactions.  For further explorations into invasive species, see this National Geographic lesson plan.   

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Colombia, National Geographic.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 2014 6:30 PM

Ecosystem imbalance