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Rubrics in Moodle 2.2 - VivaeLearning: The Best Free Video Tutorials Online

Rubrics in Moodle 2.2  - VivaeLearning: The Best Free Video Tutorials Online | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A first (and very brief) look at rubrics or marking criteria in Moodle 2.2 -to be available in December 2011

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 13, 12:26 PM

This short (4 1/2 minute) video gives you a clear understanding of the Moodle rubric tool. You are lead through creating and using the rubric and see results from both the instructor and student point of view. 



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Using 'Self-Initiated Transfer' To Drive 21st Century Assessment

Using 'Self-Initiated Transfer' To Drive 21st Century Assessment | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Testing is a major challenge in education.

Agreeing on what’s to be tested and how it’s to be administered is a matter of much debate. It’s also a big business...

[Common Core testing may include] adaptive computer-based testing to the existing assessments forms, which in many states include short-written responses. While efforts like these continue, there remains a chasm between the progressive vision of a 21st century learning environment, and a decidedly 20th century assessment style.


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 1, 4:40 PM

If the goal in education is to graduate students whom are 21st century ready (a century we are already 14 years into) the question of appropriate testing comes up. This post explores this issue and shares what may be taking place in a classroom and how it is not necessarily testable with paper and pencil. Therefore as educators we need to "promote self-initiated transfer." 

The post is split into three sections. The first section looks at testing today. The second section provides "a picture of 21st century learning." The third section explores the challenge, the fact that in theory we are teaching one way and assessing a different way (and as they refer to it in the post, we may be teaching 21st century but we are using an assessment tool that is 20th century). The final section explores one possible solution.

There is much to ponder on in this post which may lead you to think of ways to help students take ownership of learning how to effectively transfer knowlege.

Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, September 2, 11:59 AM

Indeed, much of the learning students will do isn't testable by paper & pencil. Computer-based testing doesn't measure the skills students will need for their future. 

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Teachers Surveyed on Using Games in Class

Teachers Surveyed on Using Games in Class | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
We have an early look at some of the interesting data coming out of a larger report on teacher attitudes around the use of games in the classroom. The numbers hint at wider use of games in the classroom and indicate teachers see the real benefit of games in helping low-performing students.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 9, 6:17 PM

Do you think games have a place in your classroom? This newly released data is from a survey of 694 K-8 teachers in the U.S. that the Joan Ganz Cooney Center conducted in 2013 to see how teachers are using digital games in their classrooms.
What are some of the findings?

* 74% of teachers are using games in their classroom

* 55% of students play games at least once a week

* 72% of students access games on a PC or a Mac, and 41% of teachers use a white board to share games

* The two greatest barriers are the time it takes to implement games (45%) and the cost of the games (44%)

This post from Games and Learning provides the current data in both a visual and written form. There is much more to be found on the website. You may also want to check out the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. They have also published an article on this which may be found at http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/2014/06/09/digital-games-in-the-classroom-a-national-surevy/

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5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Teacher feedback must be informative and encouraging for students to fully understand whether they're learning and what they can do to improve the learning process.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 3, 7:32 PM

Do you know how to provide meaningful feedback to your students. This post in Edutopia provides five suggestions, all of which are included in the illustration above (located here).

What are the suggestions?

* Be as specific as possible

* The sooner the better

* Address the learner's advancement toward a goal

* Present feedback carefully

* Involve learners in the process

Additional information on these five suggestions are in the post.

Mary Starry's curator insight, September 14, 4:38 PM

The role of immediate, meaningful feedback must also be incorporated into the active learning environment.

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11 Bad Teaching Habits That Are Stifling Your Growth

11 Bad Teaching Habits That Are Stifling Your Growth | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"There’s a certain class of mistakes that all educators can eliminate with conscious effort, and in this post we outline 11 of them. They range from habits of practice to habits of thought, but all of them have one important thing in common: they make your job harder."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 13, 7:26 PM

For many of us this school year has come to an end or will shortly. Perhaps it is time to reflect on our year and consider habits that might need to be changed. This post looks at 11 habits. A few are listed below.

* Not learning from colleagues. This seems simple, but given how busy our day is it is tough to find time to observe another teacher, or have someone tape you and ask others to provide you with feedback.

* Assuming a lesson taught is a lesson learned. Have you asked yourself how many times you have repeated a portion of a lesson? With the range of students in our classrooms the need to rephrase, review, reteach key points may be more necessary than we think.
* Failing to establish relevance. At times this may seem difficult to do, but for our students to learn we need to make our topic relevant to them. When you are successful with this share your ideas with others!
Click through to the post to see 8 additional habits that you may want to change.
Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, June 14, 8:15 AM

#11 - Not getting to know your students. I think this is the most important tip -- but they're all good. 

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The Ethical Researcher: How to Assess a Bibliography for Understanding

Students learn from assessments that inform and improve their performance -- what Grant Wiggins calls "educative assessments." Yet often a bibliography is designed to be an "audit," an assessment at the end of teaching and learning. A typical documentation standard reads something like this one from California:

"Understands the reasons and methods for citing sources" (Standards and Guidelines for Strong School Libraries 8.2)

What does "understand" mean and how can we assess it?

 


Via Shannon Robinson
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Ethical researcher and the use of Bibliograpghy

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