NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 11:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 3:55 PM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 7:43 PM

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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Unfolding Truth: Dismantling the World Bank's Myths on Agriculture and Development (PDF)

Unfolding Truth: Dismantling the World Bank's Myths on Agriculture and Development (PDF) | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
In the 1980s and 1990s, the World Bank and International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) intervention in developing countries’ national policies, through aid conditionality and austerity programs known as Structural Adjustments Programs (SAPs), triggered a wave of global resistance against the International Financial Institutions (IFIs). in the face of growing criticism that these policies increased poverty, debt, and dependency on rich countries, saps were eventually withdrawn in 2002; however the World Bank, through renewed means, continues to pursue and impose its neoliberal agenda on the developing world.

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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jon inge's curator insight, October 7, 2014 9:29 AM

market based solutions don't help the very poorest 

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 11:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 3:46 PM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 27, 2014 3:32 AM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 2014 5:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 10:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 13, 2014 12:44 AM

APHG-U2

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Tanzania. East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis | IFPRI

Tanzania. East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis | IFPRI | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis | IFPRI

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IFPRIKM's curator insight, January 16, 2014 1:24 PM

The second of three books in IFPRI's climate change in Africa series, East African Agriculture and Climate Change: A Comprehensive Analysis examines the food security threats facing 10 of the countries that make up east and central Africa - Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda - and explores how climate change will increase the efforts needed to achieve sustainable food security throughout the region. East Africa's populations is expected to grow at least through mid-century. The region will also see income growth. Both will put increased pressure on the natural resources needed to produce food, and climate change makes the challenges greater. East Africa is already experiencing rising temperatures, shifting precipitation patterns, and increasing extreme events. Without attention to adaptation, the poor will suffer.

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Global Food Security Index Adds New Quarterly Food Price Adjustment Factor | DuPont Food Security

Global Food Security Index Adds New Quarterly Food Price Adjustment Factor | DuPont Food Security | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Food security means local solutions to a global challenge. Every part of the world is unique. Our food security solutions should be just as unique.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 3:30 PM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 1:53 PM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 10:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Brazil's ethanol revolution

"United Nations, June 2008 - The bio-fuel, ethanol, is generating a revolution in renewable energy that could help reduce the world's thirst for oil. In Brazil, the production of ethanol from sugarcane is booming, but what is not clear is the impact it is having on the industry's sugarcane cutters."  Transcript of video available here.


Via Seth Dixon
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Production of ethanol from sugarcane is booming

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Patty B's curator insight, November 10, 2015 10:19 PM

S. AMERICA SCOOP:

The 'ethanol revolution' occurring in Brazil is a critical topic to examine in terms of global geography. With it's ethanol export rising 70% as of 2007-08, and with an abundance of sugarcane, Brazil is now beginning to offer an alternative to tradition fuels (especially for cars). Brazil is exporting a great deal of ethanol which is stimulating its economy, but there is a negative side to this energy boom. It's causing a great deal of unemployment in Brazil due to the mechanization of the process of sugarcane cultivation. The effects of a country or region's main commodity always goes under this mechanization process, it just depends on when the need for that commodity arises (this kind of relates to "Guns, Germs, and Steel" and the idea of determinism).

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 6:01 PM
This sounds like something that people need to learn from, making fuel from sugar and alcohol. It is said that because of this Brazil is a world leader in in this sector. Doing so reduces emissions making a cleaner environment. This is future. .Doing things such as this and making machine mechanized cutters is good too, because now humans do not have to do it. When humans by hand get the sugar they have to burn plants, and burning plants pollutes the air because of the fire and the fire can cause severe destruction if it gets out of hand. With hand picking going out, it will be better overall. Delivering ethanol to the rest of the world is believed to lift the developing world out of poverty. .
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 7:43 PM

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  Click here for a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol.  

 

Tagsenergy, resources, political ecology, agriculture, food production, land use, Brazil, South America.

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Ghana Agriculture Production Survey (GAPS): Report on data quality and findings on key indicators 2011/2012 minor season survey | IFPRI Publication


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IFPRIKM's curator insight, July 23, 2014 5:37 PM

The Ghana Agriculture Production Survey (GAPS) undertaken by the Statistics, Research and Information Directorate (SRID) of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture is designed to provide data on community amenities, characteristics of farm families, utilization of land, use of inputs, outputs of major agricultural commodities, post-farm activities, household incomes, health of farm families, and health of farm animals on an annual basis.

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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 2014 5:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 7:16 PM

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 7:51 PM

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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Mobile Phone-Based Agricultural Extension in India; Can providing farmers with agricultural advice via mobile phone increase knowledge and adoption of improved farming technologies and practices?

Mobile Phone-Based Agricultural Extension in India; Can providing farmers with agricultural advice via mobile phone increase knowledge and adoption of improved farming technologies and practices? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Indian farmers who received timely agricultural advice via mobile phone used more effective pesticides and were more knowledgeable about lucrative crop varieties.

 

India is the second largest producer of cotton after China, but cotton farmers in India have yields only one-third as large as those in China. Many factors may contribute to differences in productivity, including lack of access to credit to invest in more productive technologies, insurance to manage weather risk, and small farm size. Another possibility is that farmers lack information about how to increase their crop productivity.

 

Researchers examined the impact of offering cotton farmers toll-free access to agricultural information via mobile phone on their agricultural knowledge and practices. In Surendranagar district, Gujarat, India, a sample of 1,200 cotton farming households were selected and researchers randomly assigned 400 to receive access to agricultural advice via mobile phone, 400 to receive both traditional extension and access to mobile phone advice, and 400 to serve as the comparison group.

 

Results showed that the take-up of mobile information services: Demand for agricultural advice via mobile phone was high, by March 2012, 58 percent of farming households that were given AO access had called in, making an average of 7.5 calls. Farmers were 22 percentage points more likely to use mobile phone-based information as their main source of information for cotton fertilizer decisions, and 30 percentage points more likely for cotton pesticide decisions relative to comparison households. These effects were larger among more educated farmers.

 

Also to mobile phone-based agricultural advice increased the use of more effective pesticides. Most questions submitted through the AO system related to pest management and pesticide use.

 

Interestingly, access to mobile phone-based agricultural advice also increased the number of farmers who planted cumin. Cumin is a high-value cash crop that requires specialized knowledge to grow and farmers’ knowledge of cumin planting seemed to increase as a result of AO and traditional extension access.


Via DfID Evaluation Department
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Mobile Phone-Based Agricultural Extension in India; Can providing farmers with agricultural advice via mobile phone increase knowledge and adoption of improved farming technologies and practices?

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Urban agriculture: Growing food in our cities

Urban agriculture: Growing food in our cities | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

City dwellers have been growing their food for millennia, but the concept of urban agriculture been formally recognized in research and public policy since the mid 90s. The International Development Research Centre played a leading role in forging this new discipline and raising awareness of it...


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