NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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Donald Trump’s attacks on Muslims fit a pattern of persecution. Just ask Jews, Catholics and Mormons.

Donald Trump’s attacks on Muslims fit a pattern of persecution. Just ask Jews, Catholics and Mormons. | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Persecuting religious minorities that are perceived as a political threat is a time-honored American tradition.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2015 12:30 PM

This is not intended to be a political post, but one that reflects of the history of religious persecution in the United States.  If you find that to be a controversial political topic, so be it.  In the past, when Americans have suspected that a religious group is undermining it's country’s free, democratic political order, we have demanded—often violently—some radical action against that group.  Let that past stay in the past.  

 

Tags: religionUSA, historical, conflict

Chelsea Martines's curator insight, December 12, 2015 3:45 PM
The author is the article, Henry Farrell, interviews David T. Smith about Donald Trump's statement about not allowing anymore Muslims to come to the U.S. He says that this is a pattern of persecutions, as many religions have been persecuted through the history of the U.S. He uses examples from Jews, Catholics, and Mormons. They have all been restricted income rights, or attacked by the government in the 19 and 20 centuries. DTS says that what the current president and the old president have done regarding Islamic extremist is controversial. Both president Bush and Obama have said that ISIS and other terrier groups could be considered not even Islamic or religious as to not be labeled as attacking a religion, so it can rather be seen as simply terrorist and then have the peaceful Muslims be kept protected.
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200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin.  The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s.  Since WWII, Central and South America and Asia have replaced Europe as the largest source of immigrants to the U.S. Immigration shrunk to almost nothing as restrictions tightened during WWII, and then gradually expanded to reach its largest extent ever in the first decade of the 21st Century."


Tags: migration, historical, USA, visualization.


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David Holoka's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:36 AM

The statistics in this article shocked me. I already new America took in a large number of immigrants, but I thought most came illegally from Mexico. Instead, the immigrants we hold are very diverse in ethnicity.  

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:56 PM

Migration

Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:24 PM

We tend to forget that the first real Americans were the Native American Indians. Immigration is a hotly discussed topic right now, but I wonder where we would be as a nation, if the original Native Americans told the settlers at Roanoke Island, the Chesapeake, and Plymouth Rock, that no, we are not allowing any foreigners to settle on our shores and land. Food for thought. Fred Issa,

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More than half of all Americans live in states where same-sex marriage is legal

More than half of all Americans live in states where same-sex marriage is legal | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"More than 168 million Americans now live in states where marriage for same-sex couples is legal following the Supreme Court’s decision Monday to not hear five states’ appeals.  That number represents about 53.17 percent of the U.S. population, according to data from the Census Bureau and visualized on the map above."


Tags: sexuality, USA. regions, map, political.


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Nevermore Sithole's insight:

Concept of Human Rights in USA

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Julia Keenan's curator insight, October 7, 2014 7:57 PM

Shows states that allow same sex marriage or have laws for or against them

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:08 PM

UPDATE: As of November 20, 2014 this is now the new map of same-sex marriage in the United States.  Notice that all the states that oppose same-sex marriage are part of one single, territorially contiguous block of states.  How come that is the spatial pattern for this issue?    

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Revolutionary War Battles

Revolutionary War Battles | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
America's war for indpendence began on April 19, 1775, when the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts.

 

Tags: USA, historical, mapping, National Geographic.


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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


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s smith's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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The Survey of Best Practices in Developing Online Information Literacy Tutorial Jul-25-2013 | PrimaryResearch.com

Primary Research Group has published The Survey of Best Practices in Developing Online Information Literacy Tutorials, ISBN 978-1-57440-247-6.

The study looks closely at how academic libraries are developing and deploying online information literacy tutorials exploring issues such as spending, budgets, staffing, range and qualifications of staff used for tutorial development, software use, time frame for tutorial development, conceptions of what constitutes a quality tutorial, assessment of library efforts, marketing to students and faculty, cooperation with other institutions, frequency of tutorial revision, measurement of student outcomes, and other issues in the development and use of online information literacy tutorials.


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PRG on ILS

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Daniel McGowan Back in Jail Days After Writing About His Secretive Prison Unit for Huffington Post

Daniel McGowan Back in Jail Days After Writing About His Secretive Prison Unit for Huffington Post | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Memos authored by Leslie Smith, the Chief of the CMU, reveal that McGowan was targeted [for] his political beliefs.


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Political Polarization in the American Public

Political Polarization in the American Public | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan antipathy is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in recent history. And these trends manifest themselves in myriad ways, both in politics and in everyday life.


A decade ago, the public was less ideologically consistent than it is today. In 2004, only about one-in-ten Americans were uniformly liberal or conservative across most values. Today, the share who are ideologically consistent has doubled: 21% express either consistently liberal or conservative opinions across a range of issues – the size and scope of government, the environment, foreign policy and many others.


Tags: political, statistics, regions, USA.


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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:57 AM

The right-wing ideology is worldwide, years of racist colonial acculturation, sexist and neoliberal social inequality. The culture industry was filled to disclose these conceptions.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:14 PM

Unit 6

A decade ago, the public was less ideologically consistent than it is today. In 2004, only about one-in-ten Americans were uniformly liberal or conservative across most values. Today, the share who are ideologically consistent has doubled: 21% express either consistently liberal or conservative opinions across a range of issues – the size and scope of government, the environment, foreign policy and many others.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 16, 2015 9:49 AM

Bipartisanship is at an all-time low in this nation's history, which is evident in every facet of our political system; our Congress for the past 10 years has been the most inactive it has been since the 1890's. Party members on both sides of the debate have refused to compromise, leaving many Americans frustrated. The polarization of the parties has been the primary driver of this divide, with ideological and social issues now at the forefront of any political debate, in the place of economic, foreign, and other domestic policies. With this ideological element now added to politics, we see much more aggression in terms of how Americans on either end of the political spectrum now view the other end. Although this is great in the sense that many young Americans are becoming more interested in and more involved with politics, it also leads to incorrect, fragmented views that demonize the opposing party. Americans are finding a shrinking amount of political issues to compromise on, and until we learn to do so, Congress will remain in a gridlock. 

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Map shows how race is a social construct

Map shows how race is a social construct | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"Americans' understanding of who counts as 'white' has changed dramatically throughout the country's history and even over the last century alone. This map — which covers a decade of immigration to the US, from 1892 to 1903 — is a dramatic illustration of what it looked like when 'white' wasn't the same thing as European.  Mouse over any part of the map to magnify it."


Tags: race, historical, USA, map.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, November 9, 2014 3:23 PM

And a political construct, too ...

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 10, 2014 8:43 AM

 Up to me, race and colour don`t matter. Most important is the personality. America have now a black President. Is it better??

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2014 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 2014 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Drawing the Line: Architects and Prisons | The Nation

Drawing the Line: Architects and Prisons | The Nation | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A call for architects to refuse to design chambers of living death.

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A call for architects to refuse to design chambers of living death.

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Phone Records of Journalists of The Associated Press Seized by U.S.

Phone Records of Journalists of The Associated Press Seized by U.S. | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The Associated Press reported that the Justice Department had secretly obtained the phone records of its offices and journalists, calling it a “massive and unprecedented intrusion.”

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Article suggests shrinking media freedom in the USA due to recent bombings. Freedom of the press is compromised. If this had happened in Africa, North America would blow trumpets (Vuvuzelas).

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