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4 simple steps to ensure you'll never, ever be tricked by an internet hoax again

4 simple steps to ensure you'll never, ever be tricked by an internet hoax again | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
You're too smart to share this nonsense

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2014 8:25 AM

Many students today are digital natives and teachers often assume that students understand how to 1) find, 2) evaluate and 3) vett online resources in a critical manner.  To read more about assessing geographic-specific resources online, see this article here. 


Tags: social media.

magnus sandberg's curator insight, November 24, 2014 9:07 AM

I would perhaps replace some of these four points with others. But that is not the most important, as any steps taken will raise awarness, and that is what we want.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:52 AM

Well, I guess we have come across incidents of Phishing and Spam e-mails? Most of these are scams that are set to draw out some money from you. Some might ask for your bank account details. 

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The Big List of The 61 Best Social Media Tools

The Big List of The 61 Best Social Media Tools | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Learn to manage social media to kickstart your business

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Seven useful social media case studies from 2013

Seven useful social media case studies from 2013 | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
We get sent a huge number of social case studies at Econsultancy so I thought it would be useful to collate a list of some of the most interesting ones I’ve seen in the past few months.

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Sunil Agrawal's curator insight, July 19, 2013 7:49 AM

Interesting collection & also useful pointers to be noted that can be applied for any similar business strategies.

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Can China control social media revolution?

Can China control social media revolution? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Microblogging is undermining the communist government's control of information, giving people access to information and the chance to speak out, reports the BBC's Michael Bristow.

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China and social media revolution.

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The Science of Positivity in Social Media

The Science of Positivity in Social Media | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
See the research behind the advice for positivity in social media, along with some examples of the brands and individuals who do it well.

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Five Social Media Best Practices for Small NGOs in Developing Countries

Five Social Media Best Practices for Small NGOs in Developing Countries | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
As a follow-up to Five Online Fundraising Best Practices for Small NGOs in Developing Countries, below are five social media best practices specifically tailored for small NGOs in developing countr...

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Katerina Diamantaki's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:33 AM

Social Media Best Practices for NGOs: using tools, media, and practices effectively

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The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

The role of social networking in the Arab Spring | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A case study for our World Development text book...

 

How useful was digital technology, particularly social networking sites, to democracy protesters in Tunisia and Egypt?  How important are the democracy protests in the Middle East and North Africa to world development?  Social media has fundamentally changed the cultural and political paradigms. 


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The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:34 AM

The role of social networking through media is crucial in the Arab Spring.  Social networking through media brings people from all areas of the world together.  It spreads a variety of thoughts, ideas, and questions.  It also acts as a major news source.  People in the United States can click a button and see what is happening on the other side of the world at any particular moment, and vice versa.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:40 PM

While we sit here on Facebook and Twitter for a way to connect with friends, share photos of our vacations or follow our favorite celebrities every move places in North Africa and some of the Middle East are using social media to change their country.  In countries like Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt people have used these social media sites to disperse information to the general public.  Where a rally will be held, a map of where police forces will be located, and what to do in the event teargas is used are all topics for discussion on social media.  With the use of these websites a larger group of people are able to take part in the overthrow of the government.  With leaders restricting the access to the web even more people were intrigued to join the protests.  When people can't follow along on the internet the events they decided to go take part in the events themselves.  With the use of these social media websites the Arab Spring in these areas was able to be as successful as it was.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 5:27 PM

I think it is important that technology plays a role in these revolutions. Before, if a revolution happened, the dictator could just silence its population. Now the population has things like Facebook and Twitter to mobilize their plans of attack for meeting places and advice about how to confront the government. As such, the power of the citizens has grown and according to the article some argue it was this power that made the government officials in Egypt and Tunisia stand down. I tend to agree since the coverage of the event helped increase the size of the demonstrations.  

 

I love that these protests for democracy are being led by the citizens. Since the citizens actually want this type of government, there is actually a chance that this might  be what the country needs. As you mentioned during the Solar Diem video, what works for one society may not translate to another. The author of this piece is more than likely from a western democracy given how the author thinks "democratic change offers the only solution"  to issues like poverty and internal strife within "Arab" countries. Yet, that isn't the case in the Middle East. By forcing a democratic revolution on Iraq,  the region is more destabilized than it was under the harsh command of Saddam Hussein. As you mentioned in class, Iraq needed a dictator like Hussein to keep peace though. So as helpful as technology might be  for democratic revolutions, democratic revolution might not be the answer to every countries problems.