NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from IFPRI Research
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Spatial price integration among selected bean markets in Malawi: A threshold autoregressive model approach | IFPRI Publication


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IFPRIKM's curator insight, July 24, 2014 8:33 AM

This research examines the extent of market integration among different bean markets across Malawi. Market integration is an indicator that efficiency exists within the flow of information between markets. The study focused on beans as they are a cheap source of protein affordable by the majority of rural smallholder farmers. Market price data for beans was obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security and covered the period 1995 to 2011. The markets included in the study are Chitipa, Rumphi, Mzuzu, Lilongwe, Mitundu, Lizulu, Lunzu, Luchenza, and Bangula. Like prices of other agricultural crops, bean prices follow a general seasonal pattern, rising with increasing time since the last harvest and decreasing during the harvest period.

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Democratic trajectories in Africa: Conclusions and policy recommendations | Oxford University Press


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Democratic trajectories in Africa: Conclusions and policy recommendations

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IFPRIKM's curator insight, January 14, 2014 11:40 AM

In Democratic trajectories in Africa: Unravelling the impact of foreign aid, ed. Danielle Resnick, and Nicolas van de Walle.

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Agricultural policy processes and the youth in Malawi | IFPRI Publication

Agricultural policy processes and the youth in Malawi | IFPRI Publication | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

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IFPRIKM's curator insight, March 31, 2014 3:13 PM

Evidence exists which shows growing disillusionment with and disinterest in agricultural-based livelihoods among the youth in Africa south of the Sahara. This disillusionment raises concerns for the future of agriculture for the developing world as it can lead to higher rural urban migration, unemployment and lowered agricultural productivity. The engagement of youth in agricultural policy formulation processes is seen as one avenue for motivating youth engagement in agriculture. This research seeks to develop a contextual understanding of the level of engagement of youth in agriculture thus providing evidence which can be used to stimulate youth involvement in the sector. Using a mixed-methods approach, this study analyzes the determinants of the engagement by southern African youth in agricultural policy processes using Malawi as a case study.

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Democratic trajectories in Africa | Oxford University Press


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Democratic trajectories in Africa 
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IFPRIKM's curator insight, January 8, 2014 4:20 PM

Despite impressive economic growth rates over the last decade, foreign aid still plays a significant role in Africa's political economies. This book asks when, why, and how foreign aid has facilitated, or hindered, democratization in sub-Saharan Africa. Instead of looking at foreign aid as a monolithic resource, the book examines the disparate impacts of aid specifically intended for development outcomes and aid explicitly aimed at democracy promotion. Careful attention is also given to examining the role of various aid modalities, including general budget support, and the influence of non-traditional donors. In doing so, the authors use a combination of cross-country quantitative analyses and in-depth case studies of Benin, Ghana, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Zambia based on recent interviews with donors, government officials, and civil society organizations. Unlike other work on aid and democracy, the book carefully considers how foreign aid affects various elements of the democratization process, including transitions to multiparty systems and democratic consolidation. In terms of the latter, the authors analyse what role different types of aid play in avoiding a breakdown of multiparty democracy or an erosion of civil liberties, reinforcing parliaments and judiciaries, promoting free and fair elections and a vibrant civil society, and encouraging competitive party systems. Overall, the authors' findings suggest that the best means for enhancing the effectiveness of aid for development outcomes is not always the most optimal way of promoting democratic consolidation, and the book provides policy recommendations to try and reconcile these trade-offs.