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Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

"All Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to do is make the world a better place for his new daughter. While he’s technically on paternity leave, he couldn’t sit idly by as India attempts to halt Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to provide free but limited internet to the developing world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 29, 2015 6:02 PM

India is a country with amazing economic potential, but hampered but uneven levels of social development.  The so-called 'digital divide' can exacebate problems for the poor and their ability to join the emerging industries.  In this situation Facebook is offering free (partial) internet access to India's poor and the discussions about net neutrality and the potential ulterior motives are underway.

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you favor Zuckerberg's proposal or do you think that India should reject this offer?  

 

Tagsdevelopment, India, South Asia, infrastructuretechnology.

   

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 2, 4:56 AM

Education access in  ALL  countries  has effects when not provided, equally!

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'Research is key to development': PM Narendra Modi tells Queensland University students | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

'Research is key to development': PM Narendra Modi tells Queensland University students | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
'Research is key to development': PM Narendra Modi tells Queensland University students - Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who visited the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane today, left behind a message for students, saying research is...

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Food security and public distribution system in India | Agricultural Research


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IFPRIKM's curator insight, July 23, 2014 4:31 PM

This study was conducted to assess the temporal changes in the status of food security in India. The food security was assessed in terms of its basic pillars—availability access and absorption. Findings reveal that though there has been a remarkable improvement in the status of food security in India, the presence of food insecurity on a large scale erodes the large chunk of sheen from the glory of economic development in India. Several initiatives have been taken to tackle the challenge of food security, and the public distribution system (PDS) has been the most important instrument of ensuring food security in India. It has been observed that its contribution to poverty reduction and food security improvement has been increasing over time.

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De Beers unhappy with Indian diamond market

De Beers unhappy with Indian diamond market | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Indian diamond jewellery consumers have been a big disappointment for the world's biggest diamond mining company De Beers in 2013.

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De Beers unhappy with Indian diamond market
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U.S.-Australia-India Public-Private Partnership Uses New Crop Technologies to Help Smallholder Farmers Adapt to Climate Change

U.S.-Australia-India Public-Private Partnership Uses New Crop Technologies to Help Smallholder Farmers Adapt to Climate Change | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, USAID Press Release, Washington, D.C. -- "The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is supporting a new public-private research partnership between the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) and India-based Vibha Agrotech to develop new climate-resilient varieties of rice and wheat, two of the “big three” primary crops required to feed the world.  The program is part of Feed the Future, the U.S. Government’s global hunger and food security initiative, and it leverages resources from both the public and private sector in Australia and the private sector in India. ...

 

This new collaboration will leverage ACPFG’s unique gene technologies and considerable expertise in cereal stress tolerance and Vibha’s field evaluation and rice transformation capabilities to develop new rice and wheat varieties with enhanced tolerance to drought and salinity, allowing farmers more stable production in the face of sudden drought and evolving salt water intrusion. The new lines will be evaluated under representative field conditions and the most successful will be transferred into the varieties that farmers grow.  Work will initially take place in Australia and India, but the technologies will be made available to developing countries in South Asia and globally where climate stresses impact cereal yields, so that farmers can be more confident that they will have a good harvest, even as climate change creates more unpredictable growing environments."

 


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Can India become a superpower?


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India

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Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 3:15 PM

I really enjoyed this video; it's packed with a lot of information, but all of it is relevant to its main discussion of India as a potential superpower. In class, we discussed the importance of the Mississippi River Valley and the Great Lakes Basin played in the development of the US economy and the rise of the US as a global superpower, and this does not differ very much from the intricate river systems that litter the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River Valley has historically been home to millions of people, facilitating agricultural development as well as trade. The lack of natural boundaries within the nation has allowed for the diffusion of the thousands of different cultures, customs, religions, and languages that find their home within India, although this has lead to division amongst its people. Internal disputes have paved the way for foreign leaders to seize control of the subcontinent, as evidenced by the Mughal Empire, and the eventual control of India by the British. Independence has lead to huge political and economic developments, as well as forming a distinct national identity that has, so far, risen above the petty sectionalist and race-related squabbles of yesteryear, but sectional rivalries continue to be had between the various Indian states. All the tools needed to become a superpower are at India's disposal; all it must do is seize the opportunity.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:48 AM

anyone who doesn't think that India can become a superpower is insane. they already are one. they have nukes. they have a billion people. they have massive industry, and they have a history of conflict with their neighbors.

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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."


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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 2014 1:57 PM

This video shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video):


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.


ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:21 PM

Interesting!

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Avoid making childish statements on decriminalisation of politics: Mayawati to Narendra Modi

Avoid making childish statements on decriminalisation of politics: Mayawati to Narendra Modi | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
Avoid making childish statements on decriminalisation of politics: Mayawati to Narendra Modi - Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) supremo Mayawati on Tuesday said the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) itself has in its rank and file people with criminal records, and urged their prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi to avoid making childish statements on decriminalising politics.
"The party itself has a lot of people with criminal records, because of which, there are a lot of issues going on within the BJP. Instead of making such childish comments, they should take a look at their own party," said Mayawati.

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.


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Police corruption in india

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Photo report's curator insight, December 5, 2013 12:19 PM

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Mobile Phone-Based Agricultural Extension in India; Can providing farmers with agricultural advice via mobile phone increase knowledge and adoption of improved farming technologies and practices?

Mobile Phone-Based Agricultural Extension in India; Can providing farmers with agricultural advice via mobile phone increase knowledge and adoption of improved farming technologies and practices? | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Indian farmers who received timely agricultural advice via mobile phone used more effective pesticides and were more knowledgeable about lucrative crop varieties.

 

India is the second largest producer of cotton after China, but cotton farmers in India have yields only one-third as large as those in China. Many factors may contribute to differences in productivity, including lack of access to credit to invest in more productive technologies, insurance to manage weather risk, and small farm size. Another possibility is that farmers lack information about how to increase their crop productivity.

 

Researchers examined the impact of offering cotton farmers toll-free access to agricultural information via mobile phone on their agricultural knowledge and practices. In Surendranagar district, Gujarat, India, a sample of 1,200 cotton farming households were selected and researchers randomly assigned 400 to receive access to agricultural advice via mobile phone, 400 to receive both traditional extension and access to mobile phone advice, and 400 to serve as the comparison group.

 

Results showed that the take-up of mobile information services: Demand for agricultural advice via mobile phone was high, by March 2012, 58 percent of farming households that were given AO access had called in, making an average of 7.5 calls. Farmers were 22 percentage points more likely to use mobile phone-based information as their main source of information for cotton fertilizer decisions, and 30 percentage points more likely for cotton pesticide decisions relative to comparison households. These effects were larger among more educated farmers.

 

Also to mobile phone-based agricultural advice increased the use of more effective pesticides. Most questions submitted through the AO system related to pest management and pesticide use.

 

Interestingly, access to mobile phone-based agricultural advice also increased the number of farmers who planted cumin. Cumin is a high-value cash crop that requires specialized knowledge to grow and farmers’ knowledge of cumin planting seemed to increase as a result of AO and traditional extension access.


Via DfID Evaluation Department
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Mobile Phone-Based Agricultural Extension in India; Can providing farmers with agricultural advice via mobile phone increase knowledge and adoption of improved farming technologies and practices?

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