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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:46 PM

The fact that traffic accounts for $3.8 billion in costs is a simply a staggering figure.  I can't stand being in traffic for 5 minutes never mind multiple hours every day just to get a mile or two down the street.  With population so high in these megacities, its astonishing to see that the governments of these cities are not focusing more on the infrastructure to stabilize the traffic.  Im sure this in turn effects the economy and the lives of all individuals involved.

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ICAI report: DFID Private Sector Development Work (Amber-Red)

ICAI report: DFID Private Sector Development Work (Amber-Red) | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Key Findings:

 

DFID has been coherent and consistent in its view that developing the private sector in a country is central to its economic development and to poverty reduction. DFID sees its work in this area as helping countries graduate from a dependency on aid. The scale of the challenge, however, is immense and DFID’s approach is highly ambitious. The department plans to spend £1.8 billion on economic development in 2015-16 – more than doubling the amount spent in 2012-13.

 

DFID’s private sector development work encompasses a wide range of different programmes: macro approaches to trade policy and regulatory reform, mid-level development of market systems and micro support to small enterprises and individuals. The impact of individual programmes is positive – particularly at the micro-level – and DFID has demonstrated its ability to assist the poor through a range of interventions.

 

DFID has not, however, turned its high ambitions into clear guidance to develop a realistic, well-balanced and joined-up country-level portfolio of programmes. There is pressure to demonstrate results against measurable targets. In none of the countries we visited did we see a plan for – or assessment of – the cumulative impact of programmes, so it was unclear how well DFID’s work overall is transforming the private sector as a tool for economic growth and poverty reduction.

 

 

Recommendation 1: DFID should clearly define and articulate where it can add most value in private sector development relative to other stakeholders. It should be more realistic in its ambitions and the impact it seeks to achieve.

 

Recommendation 2: DFID should provide clearer guidance to its staff on how to design a coherent and well-balanced private sector development country portfolio that matches its goals for an end to extreme poverty through economic development and transformational change.

 

Recommendation 3: DFID needs better to calibrate and manage the risks associated with private sector development and so innovate in a more informed fashion.

 

Recommendation 4: DFID needs to work harder to understand the barriers and business imperatives faced by the private sector in participating in development. Wherever it operates, DFID needs to be clear how and where its interventions can address these barriers.


Via DfID Regional Directorate
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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Geography Education
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:46 PM

The fact that traffic accounts for $3.8 billion in costs is a simply a staggering figure.  I can't stand being in traffic for 5 minutes never mind multiple hours every day just to get a mile or two down the street.  With population so high in these megacities, its astonishing to see that the governments of these cities are not focusing more on the infrastructure to stabilize the traffic.  Im sure this in turn effects the economy and the lives of all individuals involved.