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Corporate Human Rights Abuses Are Fine, United States Tells the UN

Corporate Human Rights Abuses Are Fine, United States Tells the UN | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Good news: The United Nations has recently approved the implementation of a legally binding body that can punish corporations that commit human rights abuses.

Bad news: The United States is furious and says it will refuse to abide by any repercussions this Human Rights Council-approved body should assign.

Up until now, the UN’s standards for corporate accountability have been strictly voluntarily. Resolving that waving a metaphorical finger at companies that commit human rights abuses was insufficient, in 2013, Ecuador initiated a proposal to hold international offenders responsible for their immoral actions. More than 80 other countries signed on, agreeing that actual accountability was necessary to diminish human rights abuse. With help from South Africa, Ecuador finally convinced the HRC to vote on the issue last week; the resolution passed by a 20-14 vote.

Alas, it’s the nations who voted no that are being the most vocal at this point, with the United States and nations in the European Union leading the charge. Before the vote, they lobbied hard to have nations reject Ecuador’s proposal; since losing, they have thrown what amounts to a hissy fit. ...“



Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/corporate-human-rights-abuses-are-fine-united-states-tells-the-un.html#ixzz36jXyPN00


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Bush Adminstration Convicted of War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity

Bush Adminstration Convicted of War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

...

This omission might be due, at least in part, to the fact that Mr. Bush is now a convicted war criminal who dares not travel abroad out of fear of being arrested.

In February 2011, Bush was forced to cancel a scheduled appearance in Geneva, Switzerland after human rights groups filed a criminal complaint charging him with violating international treaties against torture.

His trouble increased dramatically a year ago when Bush — along with former Vice President Dick Cheney, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, and several other top Bush administration officials — were convicted of war crimes in absentia by a special war crimes tribunal in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Tribunal was convened and conducted according to internationally recognized procedures and rules of evidence, and the week-long hearing ended with the five-member panel unanimously delivering guilty verdicts.

What is the significance of that tribunal? Is its verdict legally binding? Are there troublesome aspects to the idea that a foreign tribunal can sit in judgment of a U.S. President — whatever we may think of his actions?...


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Yemen Human Rights Minister takes outrage over drones to the media

Yemen Human Rights Minister takes outrage over drones to the media | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

In an opinion piece published on Tuesday in the Washington Post, Human Rights Minister Hooriah Mashour expressed her opposition of US-led drone attacks in Yemen by denouncing the ruins they leave in their trail.
An activist at heart and a fierce advocate for human dignity and Yemen’ s national sovereignty, Minister Mashour has long denounced Washington anti-terror policy in Yemen, having warned in many instances that drones would only generate more hatred and trauma than they are worth. In line with security experts and analysts, Minister Mashour would rather see the government implement a strategy which seeks to uproot Islamic radicalism at its base, through educational program and awareness campaigns than bomb civilian communities on the off chance that militants might happen to be present.
After December 12th astronomical miss, Minister Mashour chose to speak out on behalf of the Yemen, hoping that on some level, the greater public will stop associating Yemenis with terrorism and emphasize instead with its people’s tragic losses.
Weeks after a US drone mistaken a wedding convoy for al-Qaeda militants, Yemen’s outrage still echoes across all provinces. Keen to highlight the sheer magnitude of Washington’s miss, the minister wrote, “December 12 was supposed to be a day of celebration for the al-Ameri family. A young bride traveled to her wedding with her relatives in Bayda province, Yemen. But in a few dark seconds their celebrations were eviscerated.”
She added, “The strike is said to have killed at least 14 civilians and injured 22 others, over a third of them seriously. This marks the largest death toll by a drone strike in Yemen since the drone war’s inception. It is also the largest death toll by U.S. strike since December 2009, when a U.S. cruise missile killed 41 civilians in al-Majala, including 14 women and 21 children.”
A voice among many, Minister Mashour’s message is simple: drones as per noted by Jeremy Scahill and most recently by Nabeel Khoury, former U.S. deputy chief of mission to Yemen, drones only serve al-Qaeda.


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Yemen Human Rights Minister
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