"News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal
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Steve Coogan & Louise Mensch Clash Over Press Regulation On Newsnight [30.10.2011]

Steve Coogan & Louise Mensch Clash Over Press Regulation On Newsnight [30.10.2011] Click the link below to SUBSCRIBE to the 'News of the World Phone Hacking'...
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 4:40 PM
Absolutely enjoyed this video because Steve Coogan is one of my favorite actors. In this video he and Louise Mensch both debate about press regulation. Coogan makes a valid point in saying that the media is way too sensationalist and unethical, in terms of publishing stories about one's private life, and that the news should be strictly about the news and not about one's private life. Although Mensch does agree with Coogan, she also discusses how, for newspapers, it is important to publish these stories because it is one of the main ways that they maintain and attract and audience and readership. I personally agree with Coogan, I don't want to know about the personal life and scandals that a certain individual is involved in, I just want to be informed on the more important issues.
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Internet major player in ethical issues arising from News of the World scandal

Internet major player in ethical issues arising from News of the World scandal | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
The most news and entertainment portal from a Canadian perspective. Television, major newspapers across Canada, health, sport, entertainment, lifestyle, free email and more.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 4:22 PM
I really enjoyed this article because I like the way it connected the internet to the scandal. This does bring up a very interesting concept: how the internet age/culture impacts newspapers and print. The internet has allowed for information to be spread and consumed at speeds that have never been seen before. However what this results in is a fast-paced journalism style that constantly tries to maintain readership and an audience. It is apparent that News of the World most likely went through with the phone hacking in order to maintain an audience and readership.
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Murdoch Media Empire: A Journalistic Travesty

Murdoch Media Empire: A Journalistic Travesty | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
The scandal shaking Rupert Murdoch's media holdings in Britain could be expected of a global media empire intoxicated with power and lacking any ethical base.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 4:03 PM
This is a very interesting article for many reasons. Although it is very evident that the author, Karl Grossman, is attacking and has a strong disliking of Murdoch, calling his media empire the "most dishonest, unprincipled and corrupt of any media empire in the history of the English-speaking world". Although thinking about his argument in a bigger picture does leave one to contemplate if certain media corporations do have too much power and influence over its consumers.
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End of the ‘World’: Rupert Murdoch’s News of the World To Close After Phone Hacking Scandal | TIME.com

End of the ‘World’: Rupert Murdoch’s News of the World To Close After Phone Hacking Scandal | TIME.com | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
James Murdoch has announced that Sunday's edition of the British tabloid News of the World will be its last.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 3:51 PM
This article basically discusses how Murdoch decided to shut down the News of the World newspaper after 168 years of circulation. His decision is due to the fact that the scandal had become too large and unwieldy for the company to control, so it was best to just shut it down. Interestingly enough he defends the newspaper by pointing out that it has done a lot of good, but that good was overlooked due to the scandal.
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Q&A: Phone-hacking scandal

Q&A: Phone-hacking scandal | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
The row over phone-hacking by journalists has led to the closure of the News of the World, the establishment of the Leveson Inquiry into media practices and launch of three police investigations. Here's a look at the key questions it poses.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 3:42 PM
This is a very good Q&A. All the questions seem to be the basic questions that one would ask when trying to understand what the scandal is about. It offers background info on the case and discusses and shows how the actions that News of the World took was not only immoral, but illegal and wrong.
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Phone Hacking Explained

ABC News 24 presenter & journalist Nick Grimm gives a backgrounder on the history of the phone hacking scadal that's mired the Murdoch press. Graphics by Lin...
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 3:37 PM
Nick Grimm does a very good job in giving an informative timeline of the basic events of the phone hacking scandal. He discusses the more important events of the scandal, the people involved, and the overall outcome of those involved.
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Phone hacking: The main players

Phone hacking: The main players | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
A table showing the people named in relation to the hacking scandal - those involved with News International and the senior police officers investigating the claims.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 22, 2013 8:25 PM
Like the victim posting, this is an interesting page published by the BBC that lists and features the main people who took part in this scandal. It offers brief background information on all the individuals involved, and in some cases even leads to pages dedicated to the prominent individuals. Also does a nice job in highlihgting whether or not the individuals were convicted and for what they were convicted.
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News International phone hacking scandal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The News International phone-hacking scandal — dubbed "Hackgate", "Rupertgate", or "Murdochgate" by the press — is an ongoing controversy involving the now defunct News of the World and other British newspapers published by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Employees of the newspaper were accused of engaging in phone hacking, police bribery, and exercising improper influence in the pursuit of publishing stories. Investigations conducted from 2005 to 2007 concluded that the paper's phone hacking activities were limited to celebrities, politicians and members of the British Royal Family. In July 2011, it was revealed that the phones of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler, relatives of deceased British soldiers, and victims of the 7/7 London bombings were also accessed, resulting in a public outcry against News Corporation and owner Rupert Murdoch. Advertiser boycotts contributed to the closure of the News of the World on 10 July, ending 168 years of publication.[1] Continued public pressure later forced News Corporation to cancel its proposed takeover of the British telecommunications company BSkyB.

British prime minister David Cameron announced on 6 July 2011 that a public inquiry would look into the affair after police investigations had ended. On 13 July 2011, Cameron named Lord Justice Leveson as chairman of the inquiry, with a remit to look into phone hacking and police bribery by the News of the World, while a separate inquiry would consider the culture and ethics of the wider British media.[2] He also said the Press Complaints Commission would be replaced "entirely".[1] The inquiries led to several high-profile resignations, including Dow Jones chief executive Les Hinton; News International legal manager Tom Crone; and chief executive Rebekah Brooks. The commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police Service, Sir Paul Stephenson, also resigned his post. Former News of the World managing editor Andy Coulson, former executive editor Neil Wallis, and Brooks were all arrested. Murdoch and his son, James, were summoned to give evidence before the Leveson Inquiry.

The negative attention garnered by the scandal eventually reached the United States, where News Corporation is headquartered and operates multiple media outlets. The Federal Bureau of Investigation launched a probe on 14 July 2011, to determine whether News Corporation accessed voicemails of victims of the 9/11 attacks. On 15 July, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced an additional investigation by the Department of Justice, looking into whether the company had violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 22, 2013 8:30 PM
WIKIPEDIA=BEST WEBSITE EVER. I always read Wikipedia when I want to be informed of certain issues because it is very informational. The information is constantly updated by the users. Although many people do often complain that Wikipedia isn't necessarily reliable because anybody can post on it, it actually is reliable because it allows the users to see where the information was obtained by providing links to external articles. This page does an excellent job in giving the background on the case (discovery of hackings, investigation, and outcome) and also does a good job in discussing the ethical dilemma associated with the case. I also liked the external links provided because it allows me to see where the information was obtained, and therefore allows me to determine whether or not it is credible.
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Hacking Report Urges Tougher British Press Standards

Hacking Report Urges Tougher British Press Standards | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
An inquiry triggered by The News of the World scandal recommended a new system of press regulation that would be backed by parliamentary statute.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 4:36 PM
This article discusses how, with the conclusion of the News of the World investigation, whether or not the British parliament should adopt and enforce a stricter and tougher regulation when it comes to the press. This has led to a strong debate whether or not there should be an adoption of a self-regulation or whether the government should intercede and assume some control over the regulation of the press. Overall this leads to a long debate of whether or not the press should be free or controlled.
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In Journalism, the End Doesn't Justify the Means

In Journalism, the End Doesn't Justify the Means | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
The legendary football coach, Vince Lombardi, once said: “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing!”

If that idea were applied to journalism, it would justify any action on the part of a reporter or editor to get...
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 4:32 PM
A very interesting article that focuses on how this phone hacking scandal has led to a general rethinking of the importance of media ethics, and how this scandal has brought journalistic ethics into the hot seat. The author does a sort of comparison between the American media and the British one. He emphasizes the fact that American companies have a code of ethics that they follow and that in America journalist follow the belief to “Get it first. But, first, get it right.”. Although he does have a valid point I still don't believe that this is the case in America either. American media companies are also very sensationalist and at times don't necessarily publish the truth. Also if you truly think about it Murdoch owns FOX and several other American media companies, so there no reason why he wouldn't apply the same practices form his home country in the US.
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Murdoch Scandal Stirs U.S. Debate on Big Media

Murdoch Scandal Stirs U.S. Debate on Big Media | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
The British phone-hacking affair that has enveloped the News Corporation has emboldened American advocacy groups who believe that media companies have become too big and powerful.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 4:13 PM
Nice article that demonstrates how the phone hacking scandal has an international impact. This article specifically focuses on how the scandal might impact the United States and its attitudes towards big media corporations. In fact it discusses how in the wake of the scandal the F.C.C. might even consider passing laws that severely limit the ownership capabilities of many media empires. THis is good because it is very important to maintain a diversity in media options, because if all media ends up being controlled by few corporations then there isn't much of a choice in what we choose to consume
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Firms reconsider ad deals over newspaper phone hacking scandal

Firms reconsider ad deals over newspaper phone hacking scandal | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
Several major advertisers in the United Kingdom are pulling advertising from the UK's News of the World newspaper amid a wave of public outrage over a phone hacking scandal.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 3:56 PM
This article provides a good look at the impact the scandal had on the newspaper's advertisers. Many prominent companies either decided to either suspend or review their position with the company including Ford, T-Mobile, and Halifax Bank. Many of the advertising firms distanced themselves from the company because they didn't want to get involved with the scandal and didn't want to tarnish their own company's image.
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How newspapers covered News International's apology for phone-hacking

How newspapers covered News International's apology for phone-hacking | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
What the papers did, and didn't do, after Wapping issued its statement of 'sincere regret'. By Roy Greenslade
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 3:47 PM
This article discussing the apology letter that Murdoch had published in several newspapers and television news programs, such as The Guardian, The Times, Sky News, and The Daily Telegraph, not only featured the apology letter, but also featured stories that further discussed the apology. In their ad, News of the World expressed remorse and regret for the damges and suffering that they have caused, do I personally believe that it is sincere? Not really, I believe that it is just a way to have people hear what they expected to hear from the company.
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News of the World's Top 10 Scandals

News of the World's Top 10 Scandals | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
Phone hacking is just one of many sticky stories the 168-year-old paper, which will close Sunday, has been involved in.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 23, 2013 3:40 PM
Before discussing this scandal it is best to look at the rather shifty background of News of the World. Based upon the numerous scandals related to this specific newspaper, it is easy to see how the company isn't the most moral and ethical. They are constantly involved in scandals that involve illegal actions such as bribery, invasion of privacy, blackmailing, and defamation.
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Phone hacking: Victims and possible victims

Phone hacking: Victims and possible victims | "News of the World" Phone Hacking Scandal | Scoop.it
A table showing some of the victims and possible victims of the phone-hacking scandal.
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Marco Frosoni's comment, April 22, 2013 8:22 PM
Interesting page published by the BBC that offers background information on both the victims and alleged victims of the phone hacking scandal. It also includes a very nice feature in which within some of the background information on the victims there are links to videos and other articles that feature the individual and their relation to the scandal