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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | Population Growth | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...


Via Lauren Moss, Quociente Cultural
Aleasha Reed's insight:

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

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Bhopkins's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:56 PM

population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:09 AM

A future to look forward to? Your potential future? Good, bad or ugly? 

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Population Growth in Metropolitan America Since 1980

Population Growth in Metropolitan America Since 1980 | Population Growth | Scoop.it
The twists and turns of metropolitan population growth are reviewed in William Frey’s examination of recently released Census Bureau data separating the bubble and bust years of the past decade.

 

Key urban demographic changes from 1980-2010:

--Metropolitan growth in both the Sun Belt and Snow Belt tapered in the 2000s, after accelerating in the 1990s.

--Growth slowed considerably during the latter part of the 2000s, especially in “bubble economy” metropolitan areas.

--Suburbs continued to grow more rapidly than cities in the 2000s, but growth rates for both types of places declined from their 1990s levels.

--Exurban and outer suburban counties experienced a population boom and bust in the 2000s.

--Hispanic dispersion to “new destination” metropolitan areas and suburbs dropped sharply in the late 2000s.


Via Seth Dixon, Rayden Duncan
Aleasha Reed's insight:

This is a map that shows the rate of change in the U.S., population wise. The most growth occured on the western and eastern coast's. There were a few places with a decreasing population.

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Rayden Duncan's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:38 AM

This relates to my topic in that it shows how the united states populaction moved into urban settings.  It show cities are generally showing an increases in population. poeple would move to cities to find jobs or shorter commute.

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A Look Ahead at the Year 2020 | SelfStorage.com [INFOGRAPHIC]

A Look Ahead at the Year 2020 | SelfStorage.com [INFOGRAPHIC] | Population Growth | Scoop.it

Through existing trends and data available, we are able to form patterns that will allow us to have a glimpse of how the future will look like.

 

The following infographic from SelfStorage.com gives us a chance to look ahead to the year 2020, with an eye toward which communities and careers will see the most growth.

 

It entails which states will have the fastest and slowing growth in terms of jobs availability, the growth of the population and the United States life expentancy. To see the stats and figures in details, check it out at: http://www.selfstorage.com/content/2020-infographic/

 

Source: http://www.selfstorage.com/content/2020-infographic/


Via Jonha Revesencio, Molly Howard
Aleasha Reed's insight:
According to selfstorage.com the U.S. population will be made up of about 40% minorities in the year 2020. Many big cities are expected to shrink, while others will grow in size. Some things will increase, including the overall population of the U.S.
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Molly Howard's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:16 PM

This page is talking about what the estimated population will be in the year 2020. It says that the population will grow slightly by the time we reach 2020. The life expectancy is also estimated to go up as well as the growth in jobs. This would be important for people to know and to see what is going to be happening within the next 6-7 years.

AJ Kingery's comment, October 3, 2013 9:14 AM
I believe the population will grow when the year is 2020. I don't think the jobs will increase because if the population gets better how are more jobs going to be open. I still think the population will grow.
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How farmland became Canada’s hottest real estate market

How farmland became Canada’s hottest real estate market | Population Growth | Scoop.it

Buy land, advised Mark Twain, because, as the punch line goes, they ain’t making any more of it. Fast forward to 2013 and that advice, as a look at prices for farmland shows, seems as prescient as ever.

As any farmer will readily tell you, the agriculture business has had a tough run. Agriculture was once an economic mainstay. Turn back the clock to 1950 and the sector employed nearly a fifth of Canada’s work force. Today, agriculture accounts for less than 2 per cent of the country’s employed workers, while its share of gross domestic product is also a shadow of what it once was. Farm prices have languished for decades, as Canada’s population has shifted from rural to urban. By the 1990s, North America was losing two acres of productive farmland to development every minute.

 

How the world has changed for Canada’s farmers in 2013. The hottest sector of the country’s real estate market is, you guessed it, farmland. The price of farmland in Canada has outpaced both residential and commercial real estate, gaining an average of 12 per cent over the last five years. In some hotspots, such as southwestern Ontario, the price-per-acre has been going up by as much as 50 per cent a year. Even pension plans and hedge funds have become players in the pursuit of prime agricultural land, interest that is only sending prices that much higher.

If global food prices are any indication, such investments could be a solid bet. Over the last decade, global food prices have more than doubled, according to the United Nations FAO Food Price Index, which tracks monthly changes in prices for international food commodities. The food riots stemming from that price inflation were part of the spark that set off the Arab Spring. So far this year prices have been falling, but they still remain within shouting distance of the record highs reached in 2011.

The strength in global food prices is no accident. The growth in global food demand is unrelenting. Part of the reason is due to population growth. The world is at 7-billion people and counting. But that’s not the only thing straining food supply. World grain demand has also soared, as households in fast-growing Asian countries trade in rice bowls for cheeseburgers. It takes seven pounds of grain to raise a pound of beef. That’s a whole lot more than it takes to make a loaf of bread. The newfound economic clout in emerging economies such as China and India, which between them have roughly 2.5 billion people, has allowed more people to diversify their diets. In turn, global meat consumption has bounded ahead at double the rate of population growth over the last two decades.

All that demand for protein bodes well for the world’s breadbaskets. That is if Mother Nature doesn’t get in the way first. A severe drought a few years ago forced Russia, the world’s third largest producer of wheat, barley and rye, to suspend grain exports for nearly a year. Before that a drought in China caused a spike in grain prices that affected everything from the price of pasta in Italy to the cost of tortillas in Mexico. Closer to home the US Midwest has been grinding through one of the worst droughts in more than half a century.

Climate change scientists warn that droughts and other agricultural shocks will be even more common in the future. Against a backdrop of climbing temperatures, Canada sits in an interesting spot. With a wealth of arable land and 7 per cent of the world’s fresh water, Canada’s agricultural potential is considerable. It’s also possible the amount of land under cultivation in Canada could actually increase as global temperatures continue to rise and the wheat belt climbs farther north.

Could it be that in the coming years we’ll also see farmers actually start reclaiming acres from far-flung suburbs? The idea is much more plausible now than it was only a few years ago. It was depressed farm prices that allowed prime agricultural land to be paved over in the first place. As food becomes more precious and more expensive, it will only add to the market forces that will push some of those farms to come back.

 


Via Stéphane Bisaillon, Brad Bortscheller
Aleasha Reed's insight:

This is talking about how Canada's land use and how the price for farmland has increased almost 50% because the agriculture buisness has been tough. It also talks about how our global population has grown a lot of the past 50-60 years, and it's becoming harder to supply food to everyone, therefor making the food prices rise. The growth of our population has a major impact on our resouces and food.

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Brad Bortscheller's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:28 PM

This is a great article about farming in Canada. It is not related to pupulation directly, but it is sort of a cause and effect. The farmland and farming aspect of Canada's economy is attracting more people. It is becoming more of an economic influence. That makes it affect population by attracting more people from other countries or attracting people from within the country changing the distribution. Either way it is affecting the population and I think it is a good article to read.

FutureInvestmentsInc's curator insight, October 16, 2014 12:32 AM

Really interesting and you might get ideas about what Canada real estate is...

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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | Population Growth | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...


Via Lauren Moss, Quociente Cultural
Aleasha Reed's insight:

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

more...
Bhopkins's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:56 PM

population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:09 AM

A future to look forward to? Your potential future? Good, bad or ugly? 

Rescooped by Aleasha Reed from Geography Education
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Population Density

Population Density | Population Growth | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
Aleasha Reed's insight:

The map is showing the world's population density. You can see that the western hemisphere is much less populated than the eastern hemisphere. In the United States it is most populated on the eastern coast. This shows where our countries population distribution lies, and shows which areas grow the most.

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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Canada Has Fastest Population Growth in G8, Driven By Immigration and Led by ... - CICS News

Canada Has Fastest Population Growth in G8, Driven By Immigration and Led by ... - CICS News | Population Growth | Scoop.it
Canada Has Fastest Population Growth in G8, Driven By Immigration and Led by ...CICS NewsThe Prairie provinces, prospering from their abundance of natural resources, led Canada in population growth in the year ending June 30th, 2012.

Via Trisha Klancar, Rayden Duncan
Aleasha Reed's insight:

Canada has the fastest growing population with a rate of 1.1%. The U.S. was second with 0.7%. The growth seemed to occur because of immigration levels. Canada has the highest immigration levels too.

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Rayden Duncan's curator insight, September 25, 2013 12:20 PM

Canada's population growth is the highest for a G8 largely due to immigration. The Canadian province of Alberta's populaction growth seems to correlate with it's heighst GDP per capita augmented by high production of oil from the Athabasca oil sands. Due to a high proformance in the reasourse secter low unemplayment rate is a result.

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What's Driving the Decline in U.S. Population Growth?

The United States added just 2.3 million people from 2010 to 2011, compared with 2.9 million from 2005 to 2006, just five years earlier.

Via Brad Bortscheller
Aleasha Reed's insight:

It highlights as to why the United States population rate is slowly declining. It is said to be because of lower immigration levels, less people being born, and just the population aging in general. It has gone from about 0.9% between 2000-2010, to 0.7% between 2010-2011. The decline in immigration rates is due to job losses in the common jobs where  immigrants tend to work.

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Brad Bortscheller's curator insight, September 23, 2013 12:04 PM

This article highlights not only the population growth but how the population growth is declining. It says that instead of going up 0.9%, it went up only 0.7% each year from 2000-2010. So while it is still growing, the growth is declining. It then goes on to explain how this is probably from a lower immigration rate. That is caused by lower amounts of construction and manufacturing jobs. Also the stricter immigration laws have lowered the immigration rate.

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Immigrants To Be Largest Driver Of U.S. Population Growth

Immigrants To Be Largest Driver Of U.S. Population Growth | Population Growth | Scoop.it
Immigration will outpace new births as the main source of U.S. population growth as early as 2027.
Aleasha Reed's insight:

This is talking about immigration and the impacts it does, and will have on the United States. By the year 2027 they are predicting that immigration will oupace the number of births as the main source of the United States population growth. This is a major deal, because this means there will be more and more people from other countries migrating to the U.S, than people being born.

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James Krall's comment, September 27, 2013 2:20 PM
WOW. GOSH THIS IS SUCH A GREAT TOPIC ALEASHA. WOW REALLY TOUCHED ME HEART.
Auston Kelling's comment, September 27, 2013 2:21 PM
how do you find all these great scoops! good job aleasha
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Canadian population surpasses 35 million

Canadian population surpasses 35 million | Population Growth | Scoop.it
Canada's population has surpassed 35 million over the past year, a 1.2 per cent increase with growth generally higher in the western provinces, according to Statistics Canada.

Via Mr. Thompson
Aleasha Reed's insight:

Canada's population finally reached over 35 million people. This isn't very much compared to the U.S, and the rest of the world. That was a growing rate of about 1.2% since the last year. Our population rate is about 0.97%. Which is lower than Canada's.

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James Krall's comment, September 27, 2013 2:21 PM
Very cool facts really boosted my brain thanks.
Cole Larson's comment, October 2, 2013 12:00 PM
Canada passed, finally. It only took 100 years to get there. Good for them
Andrew Whitten's comment, October 2, 2013 12:02 PM
When did Canada get passed and what year. The fact are cool but I would like to know more about the population in Canada. Nice Job