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New York I Love You™
A look at the City through people, pictures and cultural curiosities
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Retro/Virus @ The Knitting Factory

Retro/Virus @ The Knitting Factory | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Lydia Lunch revolutionized the downtown scene in the 1980's, fronting ultra-confrontational art-noise-rock purveyors Teenage Jesus and the Jerks and 8 Eyed Spy. Today, she has assembled a murderers row of visionaries (Weasel Walter of Flying Luttenbachers, Bob Bert of Sonic Youth/Pussy Galore and Algis Kizys of Swans) and back her on a short US tour featuring Lunch "classics" from her dirty old days. — By Brad Cohan

Price: $18/$20

Knitting Factory Brooklyn
361 Metropolitan Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11211
347-529-6696 | http://www.knittingfactory.com

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Why Brooklyn Is Suddenly New York's Best Moviegoing Borough

Why Brooklyn Is Suddenly New York's Best Moviegoing Borough | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
Move over, Manhattan -- Brooklyn is steadily turning into the best place to watch movies in New York City.
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Ed J Alvarez's curator insight, January 19, 2013 12:58 PM

It had to be ... There is so much going on in the New Brooklyn these days.

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Hollow

Hollow | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Venue: Players Theatre - NY
115 Macdougal Street,
New YorkNew York 10012

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Nyc Choreographer's Ball Carnival Party

Nyc Choreographer's Ball Carnival Party | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
The NYC Choreographers Ball Carnival Party18 to party / 21 to drinkWelcome to The NYC Choreographers Ball, where the best NYC dance studios and serious dancers come together to perform an incredibly hot show, with different styles, genres, and...
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Halloween after Sandy

Alternate side suspended again and HAPPY HALLOWEEN every one as you know parade been cancelled but i will post other places to go today.


Check this out tho!

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Eat, Drink and Be Literary in NYC

Eat, Drink and Be Literary in NYC | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

credits: Corinna Bajocco

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Violette L. Meier's curator insight, January 14, 2013 12:12 PM

Nice!

Teresa Levy's curator insight, May 25, 2013 2:14 PM

wonderful bookstore. I hope it is still opened

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10 People You'll Only See in New York City

10 People You'll Only See in New York City | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
Let's face it: New York is home to some unique and, albeit, bizarre people. Here are some of the folks you'll only see here in the Big Apple.
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Moby-Dick Marathon NYC: Where to go before and after

Moby-Dick Marathon NYC: Where to go before and after | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

If you’ve been meaning to tackle Herman Melville’s massive 1851 novel, Moby-Dick—which tells the story of Captain Ahab and his all-consuming obsession with a great white whale—then consider the Moby-Dick Marathon NYC (Nov 16–18; mobydickmarathonnyc.org) the perfect opportunity to dive in.

More than a hundred lit lovers will read sections of the epic tome at WORD (126 Franklin St at Milton St, Greenpoint, Brooklyn; Nov 16 5pm–midnight), Housing Works Bookstore Cafe (126 Crosby St between E Houston and Prince Sts; Nov 17 10am–3pm, Nov 18 10am–4pm) and Molasses Books (770 Hart St between Knickerbocker and Wilson Aves, Bushwick, Brooklyn; Nov 17 4pm–midnight). Actor Paul Dano will get the nautical party started on Friday with the book’s iconic first line, “Call me Ishmael.” If you’re wondering where to go pre- and postmarathon, let participants guide you to some of their favorite spots near the event’s locations.

Amanda Bullock Marathon cofounder and director of public programming at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe
Where to go: “I love a good dive bar, and Botanica (47 E Houston St between Mott and Mulberry Sts, 212-343-7251) is one of the best. They have a dangerous happy hour until 8pm every day; treat yourself to a dark and stormy, it fits the sea theme! Two Boots (74 Bleecker St between Broadway and Crosby St; 212-777-1033, bleeckerst.twoboots.com) is a go-to lunch spot. Perfect place to grab a slice on your way from Housing Works to Molasses on Saturday afternoon; I usually get a Grandma Bess and/or a Tony Clifton.”
Why she loves Moby-Dick: “You can read it in so many ways: there’s the pure adventure/madman story, there’s a buddy-comedy aspect between Queequeg and Ishmael, it’s a fascinating portrait of that period in history, there’s the lit-crit kind of symbolism and all that, etc. The book is so funny, and so huge yet so real, and it’s an American epic through and through, and it’s a portrait of this antiquated industry but of a type of man who appears in all times and places.… It’s everything. Very rarely is one book everything; many books are perfectly one thing, but very rarely is one book everything like this one is. Plus, it has funny words like pudding-headed whale and boatswain.”

Sarah Vowell Author (Unfamiliar Fishes, The Wordy Shipmates)
Where to go: “The most contemplative spot in Soho—and probably the cheapest, considering it’s free—is The New York Earth Room (141 Wooster St between Prince and W Houston Sts, diacenter.org), Walter De Maria’s installation. What it is: a big quiet loft full of dirt. It has this stark sense of calm—unless you have a real-estate license and can’t deal with zillion-dollar lofts bogarted by artsy nonprofits for 35 years. For those not sickened by yarns of whale butchery, the Queequeg-iest brunch spot near Housing Works might be Freemans (Freeman Alley off Rivington St between Bowery and Chrystie St; 212-420-0012, freemansrestaurant.com). Its ye olde vibe and antlered walls have a kind of cute New England bloodlust.
Why she loves Moby-Dick: “What a book! Whenever I’m writing and I get stuck, which is to say all the time, I crack it open at random and read a paragraph or two out loud. Its lingo is so musical, so weird and biblical and slinky, it never fails to rekindle my ardor for words and wording. Plus, the 14-year-old boy in me thrills at both the high seas adventure and all the disgusting descriptions of blubber processing.”

Fiona Maazel Author (Last Last Chance, and the forthcoming Woke Up Lonely, spring 2013)
Where to go: “If you’re headed to Molasses Books, you gotta go to Mama Joy’s first (1084 Flushing Ave at Porter Ave, Bushwick, Brooklyn; 347-295-2227, mamajoys.com) for all-day brunch. Shrimp and grits, fried chicken, or, you know, just go there for the biscuit and duck gravy. So. Friggin’. Good.”
Why she loves Moby-Dick: “Moby-Dick is the perfect book for a marathon reading, because you can open it to any page, like I did just now, and land on a sentence like: ‘For as this appalling ocean surrounds the verdant land, so in the soul of man there lies one insular Tahiti, full of peace and joy, but encompassed by all the horrors of the half known life.’ In sum: This novel indicts us on every page; hard to go wrong with that.”

Jason Diamond Deputy editor of Flavorpill and founder of Vol. 1 Brooklyn
Where to go: “I’m a big fan of the Diamond (43 Franklin St between Calyer and Quay Sts, Greenpoint, Brooklyn; 718-383-5030, thediamondbrooklyn.com), not only because I share a name with it, but also because it has one of the best beer selections in Brooklyn. I’m also in love with the Black Rabbit (91 Greenpoint Ave between Franklin St and Manhattan Ave, Greenpoint, Brooklyn; 718-349-1595, blackrabbitbarnyc.com), and I’m hoping it will be chilly enough for them to have the fireplace on. I’ve noticed that after bigger events at WORD, the crowd tends to move to either of those two places. I’ll also be taking the East River Ferry there. Is there any other way for one to get themselves to a Moby-Dick marathon than by water?”
Why he loves Moby-Dick: “Moby-Dick is one of those novels that grows with you long after you’ve read it. It’s such a big book, but you get so much out of the entire thing. There aren’t many books where you can walk away thinking, I just read an amazing and somewhat crazy book about America’s pre–Civil War growing pains, a person’s obsession, friendship, loneliness, lots of information about whales and a bunch more.”

Ophira Eisenberg Host of NPR’s Ask Me Another
Where to go: “I’m reading at Housing works so beforehand I highly recommend popping in for a macaron and coffee at Dominique Ansel (189 Spring St between Sullivan and Thompson Sts; 212-219-2773, dominiqueansel.com). Not only are you dealing with the former pastry chef at Daniel, but they do something to their coffee that makes it taste like the freshest pot you’ve ever had—and one cup gives you the effects of drinking an entire pot. There is a glass ceiling and greenhouse-like seating in the back area that is the perfect place to enjoy a little enclosed sunshine, or better yet, a rain storm.”
Why she loves Moby-Dick: “What excites me about reading this is because the act of reading Moby-Dick is often talked about as a noble chore. Heck, Nathaniel Philbrick wrote an entire book explaining why we should read Moby-Dick, claiming that it’s ‘our American Bible.’ Mitt Romney might not agree with that, but I do.”

Polly Bresnick Writer, teacher and Marathon cofounder
Where to go: “Milk & Roses (1110 Manhattan Ave between Clay and Dupont Sts, Greenpoint, Brooklyn; 718-389-0160) has book-lined walls, huge glasses of delicious wine, cured meats and Italian cheeses. Go there if you need a break from the Marathon, but still want to feel bookish. The Pencil Factory (142 Franklin St at Greenpoint Ave, Greenpoint, Brooklyn; 718-609-5858) is a block north of WORD; we’ll probably be after-partying there. Tandem Bar (236 Troutman St between Knickerbocker and Wilson Aves, Bushwick, Brooklyn; 718-386-2369) is right around the corner from Molasses. They play weird, awesome music there. If I don’t collapse with exhaustion, I will probably stumble towards Tandem for the after-party on Saturday.”
Why she loves Moby-Dick: “Moby-Dick is my favorite book of all time. It gets gorgeous, it gets gross, it’s funny, it’s brave, it’s companionable, and it has this really family-of-humans spirit threaded through it. On more than one occasion in this book, Melville puts his finger on the pulse of the interconnected webbing of all humans (and creatures). Reading Moby-Dick, especially aloud with a group of fellow enthusiasts, makes me feel thrilled to be alive! Seriously. I know it sounds dorky, but it’s true. It’s kind of the closest thing I have to religion or worship.”

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Your Day is My Night: Film Excerpts and Live Performance - Tenement Museum

Your Day is My Night: Film Excerpts and Live Performance - Tenement Museum | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Think these bedrooms are crowded? Many immigrants still take turns sleeping in "shift beds" right here in New York City. Join us tonight at 6:30 for a Tenement Talk on the new film "Your Day is My Night" to learn more. Can't make the talk? You can watch & listen online!

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Teresa Levy's curator insight, May 25, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting concept

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Wylie Dufresne Will Open Alder in the East Village

Wylie Dufresne Will Open Alder in the East Village | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Wylie Dufresne, the brainy, avant-garde chef who has spent the last decade redefining fine dining at wd~50 on the Lower East Side, is opening a second restaurant next spring in the East Village at 157 Second Avenue.

In a change of gears for the chef, Alder will be a 50-seat pub. It will open in the former Plum Pizzeria space, just three blocks south of Momofuku Ssäm Bar. The kitchen will serve "modern casual food and well-crafted cocktails," according to a rep for the restaurant. The name Alder is the Old English analog for Ellery, the name of Dufresne's second daughter.

The chef, who started serving personal food with modernist and fine-dining tendencies almost ten years ago on Clinton Street (then crowded with bodegas and old neon), has quietly ended up influencing a new generation of chefs worldwide. Dufresne overhauled the entire menu at wd~50 earlier this year. The opening of Alder will coincide with wd~50's ten-year anniversary.

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Six Artists in Sixty Seconds

Six Artists in Sixty Seconds | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

We think of Polaroid instant film as something for ordinary snapshots, but it often became a medium for serious artists. From the beginning, no less an artist than Ansel Adams recognized its potential. Aided by his proselytizing, Polaroid soon caught the eye of prominent photographers. Some used it just for lighting tests before shooting conventional film, but others embraced it on its own merits. In this excerpt, adapted from New York senior editor Christopher Bonanos’s Instant: The Story of Polaroid (out this week from Princeton Architectural Press), you’ll see six artists who took it in unique and beautiful directions.

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Gardening Without The Actual Garden: A Guide to Growing Stuff In Your Apartment

Gardening Without The Actual Garden: A Guide to Growing Stuff In Your Apartment | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
Brooklyn's best gardeners give us the inside information.
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The BookEasy

The BookEasy | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Urban Librarians Unite kicks off Banned Books Week with a night of readings from banned or censored literature as well as live music from members of the librarian band Lost in the Stacks.

The Way Station

683 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11238

2, 3 at Grand Army Plaza; C at Clinton-Washington Aves.; B, Q at Seventh Ave.

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The People's Bailout

The People's Bailout | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

This Jerry Lewis/Muscular Dystrophy-style telethon offers a terrific assortment of politically engaged entertainers appearing on behalf of Rolling Jubilee, which tries to beat the plutocrats at their own game by buying debt on the cheap and abolishing it. Janeane Garofalo, Lizz Winstead, the Yes Men, Jeff Mangum, Lee Ranaldo, Guy Picciotto (Fugazi), Tunde Adebimpe (TV on the Radio), and the Invisible Army of Defaulters comprise a mere sliver of the lineup, which will be livestreamed at rollingjubilee.org. — By Richard Gehr

Price: $25

7:00 p.m. November 15

@ Le Poisson Rouge
158 Bleecker St.
New York, NY 10012

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Phonebooth Hacking on the Bowery | Bowery Boogie

Phonebooth Hacking on the Bowery | Bowery Boogie | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
We've seen some pretty cool phonebooth hacking over the years.
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Robicelli's Owner Organizing Relief Efforts

Robicelli's Owner Organizing Relief Efforts | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
Lending a helping hand in Bay Ridge and elsewhere.
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MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition of Matt Connors

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition of Matt Connors | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

LONG ISLAND CITY, NY http://www.ps1.org 

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition of Matt Connors (American, b. 1973), comprising twenty-three paintings from 2008 to the present, including five new works. Organized by MoMA PS1 Curator Peter Eleey, Matt Connors: Impressionism is on view on the 3rd floor of MoMA PS1 through December 31, 2012. The paintings of Matt Connors aren’t catchy, but they rattle around the brain like a Top-40 track sung last night in a karaoke bar—familiar, slightly off-key, and delivered in an honest voice. Like the singer, Connors offers profane and intimate tributes, inserting his artistic voice alongside and among the popular melodies of the modernist pictorial tradition. This is the thrill of the “vocals” of his Vocals (2010), which at first appears to be little more than squiggles. On closer examination, an endearing two-step reveals itself: a collection of doodles the artist has dashed off, and then another set of adjacent lines he has carefully painted to emulate them. It is a painting singing along to its own tune, and an allegory of the troubled yet carefree state of contemporary abstract painting. The piece also hints at the attitude of Connors’ broader practice. His paintings regularly put quotation marks around themselves: a rendition of a logocovered plastic bag, for example, is accompanied by a cartooned version of that very painting elsewhere in the exhibition, which includes a range of work created over the past half-decade. A Connors painting often points elsewhere in form, process or content, but it does so without clear direction. His canvases absorb influences from a disparate and evolving roster of artists in the jukebox of art history (as well as writers, filmmakers and musicians) to whom he looks for inspiration, and this porosity is likewise reflected in the formalities of his method. Connors’ paintings are remarkable for the apparent thinness of their surfaces; paint usually ends up in them, rather than on them. He may make rubbings from other paintings, or use one wet painting to imprint another. His work takes and offers impressions not only of its immediate surroundings, but also of things more distant in time and space. For all that his work draws upon, Connors’ paintings are notably self-sufficient when considered together. Like members of a large, extended family, they bear traces of one another, and sometimes prop up or lean into each other. Matt Connors has been the subject of a solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Düsseldorf; and with Fergus Feehily, a two-person show at the Dallas Museum of Art. He will be included in the upcoming exhibition, Painter, Painter at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. In 2012, Matt Connors received the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship Grant and the Belgacom Art Prize. He received his BFA in 1995 from Bennington College and his MFA in 2006 from Yale University School of Art. Connors grew up in San Diego; he lives and works in New York. 


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The 7 Best Horror Movies Set in New York City

The 7 Best Horror Movies Set in New York City | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Scary things happen in New York all the time! Here are some movies about those scary things.

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Sometimes pictures do not need a caption

Sometimes pictures do not need a caption | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Today more than ever.

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Kids party in Williamsburg

Kids party in Williamsburg | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Photo Credits: Corinna Bajocco

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Stars Tweet About Sandy

Stars Tweet About Sandy | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
Bette Midler, Questlove from the Roots and Lena Dunham were all tweeting about the storm and its impact.
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Hurricane Sandy Slideshow: The Frankenstorm in Photos

Hurricane Sandy Slideshow: The Frankenstorm in Photos | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it
Here we go....
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New York City Wine & Food Festival, October 11-14, 2012

New York City Wine & Food Festival, October 11-14, 2012 | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

We’ve performed a coup of California’s top talent. Charles Phan, the patriarch of the incredible Slanted Door restaurant in San Francisco and author of the newly released cookbook Vietnamese Cooking will host “Opening The Slanted Door”, the closing affair of the Festival’s Dinner Series at the International Culinary Center.  Phan’s introduction of fresh ingredients into Vietnamese time-honored cooking techniques in this intimate sit-down setting is the perfect way to close the Festival’s 5th anniversary in style. This ingredient-driven menu will prove why Zagat said that Phan’s cooking is “‘the pinnacle of Asian cuisine”.

Guests will be assigned seating prior to this event. We can only guarantee guests who purchased tickets together will be seated together. If you would like to be seated with another guest(s), please send your request via email to tickets@nycwff.org.

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5 Top Autumn Cultural Events In New York City

5 Top Autumn Cultural Events In New York City | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Something that is never missing in this beautiful unsleeping city is the variety of possibilities and magnificent events that are on display all year around. Within the romance of this fall 2012, one more time New York offers us numerous cultural activities, from music to design, from film festivals to exhibitions. Among the great assortment, here are five special happenings are really worth mentioning.

Fuerza Bruta  (or Brute Force)
Ongoing through November 11

The production involves performers and spectators in a mute, smooth, water environment in which the surrounding music triggers naïve and suggestive emotions for a show that has a flavor of transcendental and magic.

The show features “mind-blowing visual effects” – a man running full throttle through a series of moving walls, women frolicking in a watery world suspended just inches above the audience” for a total “heart-pounding theatrical experience!”.  Find all the details at -  cit. fuerzabrutanyc.com

Daryl Roth Theatre
101 E. 15th St.
Manhattan, NY 10003
More info on: www.fuerzabrutanyc.com

Architecture & Design Film Festival
October 18 – October 21

The Architecture & Design Film Festival is in its fourth season this year with 25 films participating. An assortment of documentaries such as the Coast Modern,a travel from Los Angeles to Vancouver along the Pacific North-West coast, directed by Mike Bernard and Gavin Froome; Machine for Life, a documentary on the concept of “the mechanized” of Le Corbusies and the connection among sentiments, experience, architecture and design; and Life Architecturally, an architectural process of concepts and designs, directed by Debbie Ryan and Robert McBride

Tribeca Cinemas
54 Varick St. (at Laight St.)
New York, NY 10013
More info on: 
http://adfilmfest.com/portal/adff

American Ballet Theatre Fall 2012 Season
October 16 – October 20

Choreographers J. Limon, A. Mille and A. Tudor have created a magnificent ballet that ranges from classic ballet to modern premieres with main artist Alexei Ratmansky. Make sure not to miss this masterpiece, only performed for 4 days in middle October.

American Ballet Theatre
890 Broadway
New York, NY 10003
More info on: http://www.abt.org/

Picasso Black and White
October 5-January 23, 2013

This beautiful exposition retraces Picasso´s works from 1904 to 1971. The Guggenheim Museum will display more than 100 pieces for the following three months. The exhibition starts from the early days of the artist, from its monochromatic canvas, to later works such as the war scenes connected to the Spanish Franco´s dictatorship.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Ave. (5 Av/89 St)
Manhattan, NY 10128
More info on: guggenheim.org.

Mozart Chopin Smetana – The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
November 2 – November 4

The violinist A. Sussmann together with the pianist I. Barnatan and cellist A. Weilerstein will perform the famous Mozart´s violin-piano sonata that the musician composed after his mother´s death. This is a masterpiece worth being seen, or better, heard from those who can be intimately moved by melancholic melodies and the power of Mozart´s genius work.

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
70 Lincoln Center Plaza
Manhattan, NY 10023
More info on: http://www.chambermusicsociety.org/

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What should I dress in NYC?

What should I dress in NYC? | New York I Love You™ | Scoop.it

Lazy Sunday

    Teddy

      226 Columbus Ave., nr. 70th St.; 212-875-0500

        The newest outpost of this local chainlet (joining the Cobble Hill and Park Slope shops) is dependable for park- or beach-ready maxi, T-shirt, and tank dresses for $100 or less. Browse comfy shapes from BB Dakota, Blue Bird, and Plum, as well as the in-house label.

        Brunch

          Joie

            1196 Madison Ave., nr. 87th St.; 212-837-2220

              The French label brings a slew of chic throw-on-and-go frocks to its U.S. flagship. The lower-priced Soft line offers shifts and jersey maxi dresses (from $120), while the main line’s breezy silks and chiffons are sweet but still grown-up (from $200).

              Office

                Annelore

                  18 Jay St., nr. Greenwich St.; 212-775-0077

                    Designer Juliana Cho has a knack for making her dress-wearers look effortlessly put together. Her genius is combining luxurious fabrics—a citrus-colored brocade for spring, say—and flattering silhouettes, whether a demure shirtdress or a swingy style (from $525).

                    Cocktail Party

                      Tucker

                        355 W. Broadway, nr. Broome St.; 212-938-0811

                          At designer Gaby Basora’s recently opened Soho spot, the statement patterns for which she is known are splashed across new styles both sophisticated and slinky, along with small-batch revivals from the archives and one-off designs (from $300).

                          Friend's Wedding

                            Z Spoke

                              875 Washington St., nr. 14th St.; 212-691-1926

                                Zac Posen’s offshoot excels in dresses that are elegant yet unstuffy (from $425). Though the line is lower priced than his primary label, Posen doesn’t skimp on his signature shape-flattering details, from seamed bodices to tastefully plunging necklines.

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