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Only 10 Words Make Up 25% Of The English Language

Only 10 Words Make Up 25% Of The English Language | New Words | Scoop.it
About 25% of all our speech and writing is one of these 10 words.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

...but all the other words are the ones that cause the reactions and criticism.

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K.M. Weiland, Author at Helping Writers Become Authors

K.M. Weiland, Author at Helping Writers Become Authors | New Words | Scoop.it
Steve Tuffill's insight:

KM Weiland has many insightful tips for writers on this Web site.

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The Fifth Estate

The Fifth Estate | New Words | Scoop.it
A movie about Julian Assange, the man who founded a website devoted to leaking information that governments wish to keep secret, is called The Fifth Estate.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Everyone has a "state" of mind. In America, homes and gardens are referred to as "real" estate. What could be more real than that?

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5 Typography Tips for Every Presenter

5 Typography Tips for Every Presenter | New Words | Scoop.it

Today, everyone is a typographer. If you have access to a keyboard and a basic software program, you have control over typography. For instance, if you construct email, write for a blog or build presentations, you have a type of control (pun intended) over your words and letters that your great grandfathers would envy.

Steve Tuffill's insight:

Here are some useful tips on typography. These can be used for some really creative promotion of your work...

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Amendment and Silent Correction of Quoted Content

Amendment and Silent Correction of Quoted Content | New Words | Scoop.it
What do you do when you wish to incorporate a quotation from another source into your own content, but the quotation includes a flaw in spelling, grammar, or the like, or you want to use the quotation selectively?
Steve Tuffill's insight:

When you feel that your style has been zipped by the original style, just follow these handy rules...

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How to Punctuate with “However”

How to Punctuate with “However” | New Words | Scoop.it
However are you going to keep this information straight? The usage of punctuation with however may seem confusing; however, the distinctions are straightforward.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

We are, however, experiencing some technical issues right now...

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30 Idioms About Common Shapes

30 Idioms About Common Shapes | New Words | Scoop.it
Figurative references to circles, squares, and triangles turn up in a variety of familiar expressions. Here’s a list of many of those idioms and their meanings.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

These are always useful for illustration...

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Quantify References to Elapsed Time

Quantify References to Elapsed Time | New Words | Scoop.it
A writer’s book-jacket bio mentions that she’s been a reporter for fifteen years. An online product review refers to a device having been launched last fall. Your blog relates that you attended a conference the previous month.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Time marches on. However, we must remember that our work may be viewed any time in the future, going forward.

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20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes

20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes | New Words | Scoop.it
A list of some of the most common grammatical errors that routinely make it into print.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

OK, so you get the message! But I am still amazed how many of these I see every day...

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7 Proofreading Steps

7 Proofreading Steps | New Words | Scoop.it
Proofreading is the last line of defense for quality control in print and online publishing.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

There is no getting away from the quality of proofreading the material you are about to submit...

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What Makes a Travel Writer? - Blog - Cool Infographics

What Makes a Travel Writer? - Blog - Cool Infographics | New Words | Scoop.it
For those who would love to travel and write, the What Makes a Travel Writer? infographic from hotelclub.com is the infographic for you. This infographic covers the ages and careers of these writers, and also what technology ...

Via Heather Jabusch
Steve Tuffill's insight:

This is an interesting infogram. It lays out the type of people who are likely to read your material and then it defines their technology...

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Babelicious!

Babelicious! | New Words | Scoop.it
WHY do some languages drip with verb endings, declensions that show how a noun is used, and other grammatical bits and pieces, while others rely on word order and...

Via Maria Pia Montoro
Steve Tuffill's insight:

A truly fascinating article, rescooped from Maria Pia Montoro's Scoop-It site, "Wordlo", investigating the complex variations in linguistic practice all over the world.

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Steve Tuffill's comment, August 8, 2013 10:49 AM
It is interesting to note that simple people with primitive technologies do not speak simple languages as a rule. And, as a rule, this article shows some of the redundancy in highly spoken European languages too. (For example: 'las casas blancas') in a culture that thrives on context to provide meaning, it is often difficult to even realize that other forms of communication even exist!
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“Congenial” vs. “Genial”

“Congenial” vs. “Genial” | New Words | Scoop.it
What’s the difference between congenial and genial? They both derive from that Latin term that also developed into genius, but their meanings are mostly distinct.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Well, I reckon that Sandra Bullock is a genius...! She also has a remarkable talent for overpowering bad guys... That root, "gen" has been used for so many words with distinctly different meanings.

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Reciprocation vs. Reciprocity

Reciprocation vs. Reciprocity | New Words | Scoop.it
What’s the difference between reciprocation and reciprocity? The distinction is fine but useful.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

There is nothing worse than unrequited love...

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How to Use Reading to Become a Better Writer | Write to Done

How to Use Reading to Become a Better Writer | Write to Done | New Words | Scoop.it

There are two ways to become a better writer, in general: write a lot, and read a lot.
There are no other steps.
Of course, within those two general directives, there are lots of more specific advice I can give you, and that other professional writers would offer. Let’s take a look at the second general directive: read a lot.

Steve Tuffill's insight:

I could not agree more.

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Purposely vs. Purposefully

Purposely vs. Purposefully | New Words | Scoop.it
What’s the difference between purposely and purposefully? The meanings are similar, both referring to intention, but they have distinct connotations.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

But do we know the difference between a porpoise and a dolphin...? Either way, it is all good information to assimilate.

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Non-standard English and the New Tribalism

Non-standard English and the New Tribalism | New Words | Scoop.it
Dave Frohnmayer, President Emeritus of the University of Oregon, defines the New Tribalism as the growth of a politics based upon narrow concerns, rooted in the exploitation of divisions of class, cash, gender, region, religion, ethnicity, morality...
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Hmmm, that is a mouthful, right?

Maeve Maddox sets out the precise reasons that we are not seeing this disregard for grammar rules in standard English.

"Grammar signifies more than a person's ability to remember high school English..."

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Permanent Archival of Author Content Soon Possible Thanks To Harvard Perma.cc

Permanent Archival of Author Content Soon Possible Thanks To Harvard Perma.cc | New Words | Scoop.it
Broken links are everywhere. Perma helps authors and journals create permanent links for citations in their published work.

Via Robin Good
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Essential, if the Internet is our all-time library resource...

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jmwakasege's comment, September 24, 2013 2:50 PM
Wow this is so powerful insights, and actual getting it fist at hand around here. And great editorial work you are doing over here, I just had to read the article because you said so, in a very clear way. :)
Blaithan Michael Altenburg's curator insight, September 24, 2013 3:11 PM

This is good that they are helping

Prof. Hankell's curator insight, September 25, 2013 10:33 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

 

Perma.cc is an upcoming web service that aims to help authors and journals create permanent archival copies of their online published content.

 

Way too often in fact, due to a multitude of reasons, not only content gets moved and relocated to new sites, becoming more difficult to find but in many others it is permanently deleted or lost.

 

To comfort your doubts that this is a true and tangible issue, you should check the work being carried out by Kendra Albert, Larry Lessig and Jonathan Zittrain, who are completing a study of link rot, available at http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2329161. ;

 

Link rot is the phenomenon by which material we link to on the distributed Web vanishes or changes beyond recognition over time.

 

Believe it or not half of the links in all of the Supreme Court opinions, don't work anymore.

 

In this context "the Harvard Library Innovation Lab has pioneered a project to unite libraries so that link rot can be mitigated.  We are joined by about thirty law libraries around the world to start Perma.cc, which will allow those libraries on direction of authors and journal editors to store permanent caches of otherwise ephemeral links."

 

The Internet Archive has provided its powerful archiving engine to support this effort and Cloudfare its distributed CDN.

 

The official tagline of the upcoming site reads: "perma.cc helps authors and journals create permanent archived citations in their published work"

 

Here is essence what you should expect from it: "Perma.cc allows users to create citation links that will never break.


When a user creates a Perma.cc link, Perma.cc archives a copy of the referenced content, and generates a link to an unalterable hosted instance of the site.


Regardless of what may happen to the original source, if the link is later published by a journal using the Perma.cc service, the archived version will always be available through the Perma.cc link."

 

N.B.: While anyone will be able to go to Perma.cc and archive any web page this resource is designed for researchers, authors and journals. In this light Perma.cc downloads the material at the designated URL and provides a new URL (a “Perma.cc link”) that can then be inserted in a paper. 


After the paper has been submitted to a journal, the journal staff checks that the provided Perma.cc link actually represents the cited material. If it does, the staff “vests” the link and it is forever preserved. Links that are not “vested” will be preserved for two years, at which point the author will have the option to renew the link for another two years.

 

 

My comment: Can't wait to test it. We need these type of archival tools like oxygen. It's not only important that we organize and curate what is important from the web, but it is essential that we also take care in preserving it for the longest possible time.

 

 

 

Free and open to all (soon).

 

Request beta access here: http://perma.cc/ ;

 

More info: http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/futureoftheinternet/2013/09/22/perma/ ;

 

 

Similar Tools: www.Permamarks.com

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Avoid Gratuitous Capitalization

Avoid Gratuitous Capitalization | New Words | Scoop.it
As an editor, I devote much of my time and energy to helping a writer bring out the best in his or her prose, but a lot of effort also goes into minor but nagging errors -- unnecessary capitalization among them.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

This of course is not an issue in the German language...

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3 Justifications for Altering Quotations

3 Justifications for Altering Quotations | New Words | Scoop.it
Generally, writers should not change the wording in quotations, but quotations that lack context or that include a gratuitous word or phrase should be repaired, as shown in the following examples.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

All useful stuff! I have had times when I have been scratching my head for an answer to some of these .

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How To Write A Book…FAST

How To Write A Book…FAST | New Words | Scoop.it
Time is relative, especially in a writer's world. It's easy for any one of us to get sucked into some shiny rabbit hole. We lose time like it's cool.

We spend time being 'busy'. Busy marketing on social media.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Photo by John O’Nolan.

The acronym FAST reveals some really great rules for getting the job done.


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Words we need in English

Words we need in English | New Words | Scoop.it
A collection of international linguistic lovelies that perfectly sum up that something that you can't quite express in English words alone.

Via Catherine Christaki, Natalia Franco [Translation and Localization]
Steve Tuffill's insight:

"Inter linguistic lovelies" describe these words beautifully...

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Judith van Praag's curator insight, August 18, 2013 2:06 PM

JvP: Since Welsh is known for a pronunciation that to non Welsh makes no sense, I would most definitely mistake their hug for the Yiddish Kvetch. Safe? "An me hoela!" (that's Dutch for Yeah right, or bite me).

Cwtch. This Welsh word means hug or snuggle, but a lot more besides. It also means a safe place, it’s an intimate and protective hug, and in 2007 it was voted the favourite word of the Welsh.

JvP: Irony happens when the intonation of a word is changed. Imagine saying gezellig with the corners of your mouth turned down. The result? The opposite of cozy, friendly, warm.

Gezellig. A Dutch word meaning homely, cosy, friendly, warm, comfortable and familiar, amongst other things. (The noun is gezelligheid.)

JvP: In order to learn the following word I'd disect it in Dutch: "Ik zwaar pok" which reminds me of "Ik heb zwaar de pokken in dat je er nog niet bent." Meaning: I'm fed up you're not here yet.

Iktsuarpok. An Inuit word encapsulating that feeling of anticipation when you’re waiting for someone to show up at your house and you keep going outside to see if they’re there yet. Brilliant.

JvP: PS I've left the meaning of the words as published bulleted by badlanguage.net

Julia Graham's comment, August 19, 2013 3:08 PM
These are great! I think 'slampadato' was made for Glaswegian girls. There seems to be a tanning salon on almost every corner!
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Rewordify.com: Understand what you read

Rewordify.com: Understand what you read | New Words | Scoop.it
Rewordify.com helps you understand more of what you read, faster. It translates hard English into easier English.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Steve Tuffill's insight:

Great resource for those who want to hit the ground running, learning English...

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Freek Kraak's curator insight, August 19, 2013 7:06 AM

Ook iets voor in het Nederlands?

Connie Baques 's curator insight, November 1, 2013 4:53 AM

This website is really cool, especially for Beginners and Elementary students. Check it out!

Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:14 PM

Un site intéressant pour les professeurs d'anglais.

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Which Words Matter The Most When You Talk

Which Words Matter The Most When You Talk | New Words | Scoop.it
Language like anything else can be hacked for greater effectiveness. Here are some techniques to make your words--your best tool at work--more...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Steve Tuffill's insight:

I like this. It is well laid out and, despite the subject matter being quite scholarly, it is very easy to read. I am glad to see this here. Thanks for sharing it, Ana!

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5 Examples of Insufficient Hyphenation

5 Examples of Insufficient Hyphenation | New Words | Scoop.it
Phrasal adjectives that consist of more than two words are often flawed in construction, perhaps because writers are hesitant to complicate a phrase with more than one hyphen.
Steve Tuffill's insight:

It is the way it is written that speaks volumes when it is read...

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