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NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
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Reality TV paves way for Neil Armstrong of Mars - space | New Scientist

Reality TV paves way for Neil Armstrong of Mars - space | New Scientist | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

To be the first to set foot on Mars may mean becoming a reality TV star. The Mars One project is in the running to send astronauts to the Red Planet in 2023, with the $6 billion mission paid for by selling global TV rights to their adventures, says Bas Lansdorp, the Dutch entrepreneur behind the plan.

 

It sounds wackier even than Inspiration Mars, but Lansdorp is serious. This week, he announced that Paragon Space Development of Tucson, Arizona, would design Mars One's space suits and life-support systems. Paragon is also on the Inspiration team, and the firm has completed life-support projects for NASA and some of its major suppliers.

 

 

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Rohrabacher: Space Launch System Makes No Sense | Parabolic Arc

Rohrabacher: Space Launch System Makes No Sense | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"Calls to maintain the Commercial Crew funding at previous year’s levels fail to take into account the planned funding profile for this program. Every year that we underfund this program we make it more difficult and more costly for NASA to certify the safety of these systems for America’s astronauts. I know that some of my colleagues are skeptical of the ability of these commercial crew companies to meet the requirements of this program, but NASA’s technical experts are not."

 

 

Stratocumulus's insight:

"At least there is one person in Congress who has a brain. I wish NASA would get all the funding they need for all their projects, but given any constraints on funding, SLS should be the first to go not the last. Commercial Space is where we will see a Moore's type law take hold given an initial kick start of funding. Government space is unable to advance like that by design which has been demonstrated over the past several decades. NASA has advanced, but commercial will add a significant multiplier effect which is already being revealed and is accelerating as more players enter the fold..To the rest of Congress, please find your brains and concentrate on setting correct priorities matching budget to those priorities, and take a break from designing your own rockets..."  getitdoneinspace

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Lyle Upson's comment, March 13, 2013 10:36 PM
it is what we get when we elect lobotomised leaders
Lyle Upson's comment, March 13, 2013 11:14 PM
i note that when i read the various space blogs, i see mostly informed comment, however, when the same articles appear in mainstream media, those blogs have a mass of posted comments from people who do not follow spaceflight and as such, those posts are reflective of US pollies believing that the backup system for access to ISS must cost three times the reality of commercial space .... ha ha ha, i can see why the pollies get away with stupidity .... the mainstream population know all about space flight, the experts are ignorant .... ha ha ha, go the pollies ...ha ha ha, sorry about the laughing
Stratocumulus's comment, March 14, 2013 1:31 AM
Yep. Public support for space exploration is often a mile-wide and an inch deep.. A mile wide as long as it all doesn't cost anything and about an inch deep in terms of actually understanding the various technologies and issues involved. It's how our politicians can consistently get away with pretending that they actually really care about spaceflight when actually they really don't.
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SpaceX considering a new commercial spaceport in Texas

SpaceX considering a new commercial spaceport in Texas | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX founder and all-around renaissance man Elon Musk told the packed crowd at his keynote at the South By Southwest Interactive (SXSW) festival in Austin, Texas, that he didn't make the trip to the Lone Star state just for them. Musk said he's also in the state capitol to chat with lawmakers about the possibility of opening a new commercial launch facility in the state.

 

So far SpaceX, which claims NASA as a key customer, has conducted its launches from Cape Canaveral in Florida or Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Musk said that given SpaceX's billion dollar contracts with the federal space agency, it has made sense to launch from those two government facilities, but opening a solely commercial spaceport is a key next step for the company.

 

 

Stratocumulus's insight:

SpaceX has not yet launched from Vandenberg. The Falcon Heavy is scheduled to lift off from there on its first flight sometime later this year or possibly not until 2014. So far SpacX has launched from Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific Ocean and from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

 

 

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Mr. Rohrabacher's Additional Views on the Science Space & Technology FY 2014 Budget | SpaceRef

Mr. Rohrabacher's Additional Views on the Science Space & Technology FY 2014 Budget | SpaceRef | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"Commercial Crew remains our most critical near-term civil space goal. We currently rely on the Russians, who have been good partners, but the Soyuz provides the tremendous risk of a single point of failure. We must create redundancy and enable NASA to certify multiple, independent, sustainable systems that can bring people safely to orbit and return them to Earth. In addition, the price the Russians are charging us continues to rise.

"We continue to hear that the SLS/MPCV system will serve as a back-up for Earth-to-orbit transportation in the unlikely event that none of the other systems in development are successful. Last year's request for this "back-up system" was more than 300% of the appropriated level of the primary system. By acting on this type of faulty logic, we have created a national debt as large as our GDP and still our nation refuses to take its foot off the deficit spending accelerator. SLS is unaffordable, and with relatively modest expenditures on specific technology development, we do not need a heavy lift vehicle of that class to explore the Moon, Mars, or near-Earth asteroids."

 

 

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Prospecting the Solar System | SpaceRef Canada

Prospecting the Solar System | SpaceRef Canada | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

What was once in the realm of science fiction is slowly transitioning to reality. A reality that has many challenges ahead before any reward, let alone, the creation of a sustaining industry. That industry is the exploitation of resources of the near-earth vicinity including the moon and asteroids.

 

In the past year there have been several high profile announcements by start-ups with plans to exploit the resources of the moon and asteroids. Companies such as Planetary Resources, Deep Space Industries, Stott Space have all added their prospecting hats to the arena.

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Mars One's Red Planet Colony Project (Gallery)

Mars One's Red Planet Colony Project (Gallery) | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

 

A look at the nonprofit's plan to land four humans on Mars in 2023.

 

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Nancy Kay Novak's curator insight, March 12, 2013 8:25 AM

This seems so unbelievable but would be very cool to achieve.  Keep innovating; mankind needs innovation and exploration.

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Elon to Texas: ‘It is looking quite good’ for Texas launch site | Orlando Sentinel

The world’s premier space entrepreneur has been launching most of his Falcon 9 rockets from Cape Canaveral — including the one that sent the Dragon capsule to the International Space Station two weeks ago. But don’t expect that to continue.

 

The Brownsville Herald reported over the weekend that SpaceX founder Elon Musk’s desire to have his own launch site is zeroing in on South Texas. That would mean as soon as he can, he might move those Falcon 9 launches out of Florida, and presumably the lucrative future of commercial space flight could follow.

 

 

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Dennis Tito's 2018 Mars Flyby Is On The 'Ragged Edge Of Feasibility' | Forbes

Dennis Tito's 2018 Mars Flyby Is On The 'Ragged Edge Of Feasibility' | Forbes | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

In 2001, Dennis Tito became the world’s first space tourist after paying $20 million to the Russian space program. Now he plans on an even bigger space journey – to Mars.

 

On January 5, 2018, Tito’s non-profit foundation Inspiration Mars plans to launch the first flight carrying humans to Mars. But they won’t be staying. The 501 day round-trip will only be a flyby of Mars, not a landing, but it will still be – by far – the longest space journey ever undertaken by humans.

 

 

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Musk on the Dragon glitch, Texas spaceport plans, and needling Bezos | NewSpace Journal

Musk on the Dragon glitch, Texas spaceport plans, and needling Bezos | NewSpace Journal | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

While Musk debuted the video of the latest Grasshopper test Saturday in his on-stage interview at the South by Southwest (SXSW) conference in Austin, Texas, it wasn’t the only space-related topic discussed during the hour-long event. Musk also provided some new insights on the problems the company’s latest Dragon spacecraft experienced immediately after launch on March 1 as well as the latest in the company’s interest in a Texas spaceport.

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Reality TV for the Red Planet

Reality TV for the Red Planet | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — As Wernher von Braun, the rocket scientist, used to say, the most overwhelming obstacle to exploring the cosmos isn’t gravity. It’s the paperwork.

 

Not to mention the money. 

 

So when Bas Lansdorp began dreaming more than a decade ago about establishing the first permanent human colony on Mars, his primary focus was not on overcoming the technological challenges. It was the business model.

 

“All the technology we need exists already — or nearly exists,” he said. “I just couldn’t figure out how to finance it.”

 

 

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SXSW 2013: Elon Musk’s space-travel evangelism enthralls crowd | Toronto Star

SXSW 2013: Elon Musk’s space-travel evangelism enthralls crowd | Toronto Star | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

AUSTIN, TEX.—Humanity’s future lies on planets other than Earth, believe Elon Musk, and he’s intent on getting us there. In his own lifetime, if possible.

 

Musk, the CEO and chief technology officer of commercial-spaceflight company SpaceX, held two entire, vast auditoriums in the Austin Convention Centre enthralled for an hour-long keynote interview at the SXSW Interactive conference on Saturday afternoon in which he talked about his various endeavours in the development of space-travel technologies, solar power and his other company Tesla’s Model S electric car. His increasingly confident ventures into outer space were arguably what the several thousand SXSW attendees were there to hear about, though, and fittingly enough, that was the topic area that had Musk most starry-eyed.

 

 

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SXSW: Elon Musk discusses hovering rocket, Mars and that NYT review

SXSW: Elon Musk discusses hovering rocket, Mars and that NYT review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

AUSTIN -- Elon Musk says if mankind doesn't make it to Mars by the time he dies, it'll be the biggest disappointment of his life.

 

Speaking to a packed crowd of several thousand attendees at South by Southwest on Saturday, the founder of Tesla and SpaceX said he might even consider making the journey himself. 

 

"I'd like to die on Mars, just not on impact," he said.


For now, he's been focusing his attention on something a bit closer to home. Musk revealed to the crowd that SpaceX is one step closer to developing a reusable rocket, saying the company recently launched a 10-story rocket that burst into the sky, rose 262.8 feet, hovered and landed safely on the pad 34 seconds later using thrust vector and throttle control. To cushion its fall back to the launch pad, the Grasshopper has steel landing legs with hydraulic dampers, plus a steel support structure.

 

 

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NASA Official Describes Commercial Crew and Its Importance to Human Space Exploration

NASA Official Describes Commercial Crew and Its Importance to Human Space Exploration | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

TALLAHASSEE, Fla — AmericaSpace spoke with Trent Smith with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. He detailed the basics behind efforts to cede responsibility of delivering crew and cargo to low-Earth orbit (LEO), primarily to the International Space Station, to commercial companies. Under this plan, this should allow NASA to focus on sending crews beyond Earth’s influence for the first time in over forty years. 

 

NASA currently has a two-pronged strategy in place in terms of its future human space flight program. The first half, the commercial segment, would handle operations in LEO. This would be comprised of companies such as SpaceX, Sierra Nevada Corporation, and The Boeing Company.

The second half involves a powerful new heavy-lift booster, the Space Launch System, and the Orion spacecraft. These vehicles are currently being developed and built to send astronauts to destinations that, excluding the Moon, have never been visited before.

 

 

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Risk Issues Remain Unresolved as Space Tourism Nears Liftoff | Parabolic Arc

Risk Issues Remain Unresolved as Space Tourism Nears Liftoff | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Space is the final frontier for hundreds of high net worth individuals seeking the ultimate tourist thrill. However, as industry delegates to a symposium held at Lloyd’s heard, some risk issues remain unresolved.

 

Suborbital flight – flying higher than 100km above sea level – will soon be a reality for anyone willing and able to pay thousands of pounds for a ticket. There are plenty of people already queuing for the privilege of being among the first 1,000 humans to experience space travel.

 

 

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New Mexico Spaceflight Informed Consent Measure Clears Legislature | Parabolic Arc

New Mexico Spaceflight Informed Consent Measure Clears Legislature | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

An extension of New Mexico’s spaceflight informed consent law has cleared the Legislature, clearing the way for Gov. Susana Martinez to sign it.

 

The measure extends liability protections to spacecraft manufacturers and suppliers in the event that passengers are injured or killed in spaceflight.

 

Virgin Galactic has threatened to pull out of a 20-year lease on Spaceport America if the protections were not extended. The company is both a manufacturer and operator of space vehicles. Virgin Galactic also said the legislation is needed to attract other tenants to the spaceport.

 

 

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Bill shoots for SpaceX commercial spaceport in Texas | Houston Business Journal

Bill shoots for SpaceX commercial spaceport in Texas | Houston Business Journal | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

While NASA's future remains cloudy in Houston, private-sector spaceflight may be in the cards for Texas. A state lawmaker has filed legislation to lure the world's first commercial orbital launch site to Brownsville, just days after the Houston Airport System said it sees commercial space flight as a viable option in the long-term future.

 

State Rep. Rene Oliveira filed House Bill 2623 to give certain counties and the General Land Office the authority to temporarily close a beach or a beach access point, enabling the launching of rockets from a proposed spaceport for the next generation of rockets built by entrepreneur and visionary Elon Musk’s company SpaceX.

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Rosamaria's curator insight, April 21, 2013 12:41 PM

Private space programs are on!

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House NASA panel lists budget priorities, but not everyone backs SLS (updated)

House NASA panel lists budget priorities, but not everyone backs SLS (updated) | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

... Committee vice-chairman, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher ( R-Ca.), released his own statement March 8 saying that, while he agreed with much of the committee's views and budget estimates, "there is one specific area on which I wish to state a different view, as I have done for the past few years."

 

Rohrabacher believes Commercial Crew is America's "most critical near-term civil space goal" and funding for it should be increased. "SLS is unaffordable" Rohrabacher continued," and with relatively modest expenditures on specific technology development, we do not need a heavy lift vehicle of that class to explore the Moon, Mars, or near-Earth asteroids."

 

 

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Asteroid mining to dominate the industry: experts | MINING.com

Asteroid mining to dominate the industry: experts | MINING.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Profiting from the riches that asteroids, stars and unknown planets have to offer not only seems closer than ever, but experts think space mining will likely dominate the extractive industry in the short term.

 

That was the main conclusion of the Canadian Space Commerce Association (CSCA) conference held last week in Toronto.

 

Arny Sokoloff, the head of the organization, told attendees that mining off the planet would one day become one of the major factors in the development of space.

 

For him, there is no doubt that space mining will go farther than earth mining, he told Canadian Press, adding that governments should encourage the industry by offering tax benefits similar to those given to mining companies.

 

 

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Mars Colony Project Signs Deal to Study Spacesuits, Life Support

Mars Colony Project Signs Deal to Study Spacesuits, Life Support | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

A non-profit organization that aims to land four astronauts on Mars in 2023 has signed its first deal with a supplier for the ambitious space colonization effort.

 

The Netherlands-based Mars One has contracted with Paragon Space Development Corp. to perform a conceptual design study into Red Planet life-support and spacesuit systems, officials announced today (March 11).

 

"We are extremely proud to have been selected by the Mars One team to provide such a vital role on the project," Paragon chief engineer and co-founder Grant Anderson said in a statement. "The objective of this conceptual design study will be to provide a well-defined pathway to mature the technologies and architectures required for long-term human habitation in the Martian environment."

 

 

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Facilitating the commercial crew era for Kennedy’s OPFs | NASASpaceFlight.com

Facilitating the commercial crew era for Kennedy’s OPFs | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

As the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) continues its transformation into a multi-user spaceport, the three buildings dedicated to processing the since-retired Space Shuttle orbiters are aiming to once again host engineers busily tending to their spacecraft. However, only one of the buildings has confirmed a tenant for the new era at this time.

 

 

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Elon Musk: How SpaceX Saved the Dragon Spacecraft from Certain Doom

Elon Musk: How SpaceX Saved the Dragon Spacecraft from Certain Doom | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

AUSTIN — At a keynote at SXSW 2013, Entrepreneur and SpaceX Founder and CEO Elon Musk described how his team stopped the Dragon spacecraft from tumbling out of control in space by performing the "equivalent of a Heimlich Maneuver."

 

In an interview with Chris Anderson, Musk described the moments after launch as "extremely nerve-wracking," since the rockets could fail and destroy the launch pad. He recalled that in the early days of his rocket launches, they had three failures and one left him picking up pieces of the launch pad from the reef for hours.

 

 

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Nevadan at Work: To the moon and beyond for Las Vegas developer

Nevadan at Work: To the moon and beyond for Las Vegas developer | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The sky isn't the limit for Robert Bigelow.

 

Bigelow, founder and president of Bigelow Aerospace, has aspirations well beyond Earth's atmosphere: Bigelow is building and launching space habitats that he says could someday serve as the foundation for a colony on the moon.

 

Space captured Bigelow's imagination at an early age. The Las Vegas High School graduate was intrigued as a child by family stories of close encounters with unidentified flying objects.

Bigelow eventually made his fortune the Las Vegas way - in real estate, developing hotels, motels and apartment complexes in the 1980s and '90s. But that construction was a means to starting a space-exploration company.

 

In 2001, Bigelow launched Bigelow Aerospace. Today, the company has factories in North Las Vegas and Maryland, and a deal with California-based Space Exploration Technologies to put habitats into orbit.

 

 

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Elon Musk: Our future in space depends on reusable rockets

Elon Musk: Our future in space depends on reusable rockets | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Austin, Texas (CNN) -- The future of space travel will depend on our ability to make rockets that can be used more than once, says SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. And on Saturday, he gave a crowd at the South by Southwest Interactive festival the world's first look at a step in that direction.

 

Musk, whose SpaceX Dragon is currently docked on the International Space Station, showed a packed exhibit hall a two-day-old video of Grasshopper, an experimental rocket. If fully realized, the rocket would propel spacecraft out of the earth's atmosphere, then flip around, sprout landing gear and return intact to the launch pad.

 

In the video, a 10-story-high Grasshopper rocket did just that -- except for the leaving-the-atmosphere part. It blasted off, hovered, and then set itself down at virtually the same spot where it began. The video, with its Johnny Cash "Ring of Fire" soundtrack, drew cheers from the crowd.

 

 

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MikeMongo's curator insight, March 10, 2013 9:11 AM

Elon Musk describes SpaceX's recent jaw-dropping save of Dragon spacecraft.

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Trent Smith on NASA Commercial Crew

 

Video interview with NASA's Commercial Crew Program Trent Smith.

 

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