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NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
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Bolden meets Dream Chaser ETA ahead of her Dryden tests | NASASpaceFlight.com

Bolden meets Dream Chaser ETA ahead of her Dryden tests | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden met with the Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) team and their Dream Chaser ETA (Engineering Test Article) at the Dryden Flight Research Center in California on Wednesday. General Bolden, a Shuttle veteran, also got to fly the baby orbiter via the vehicle’s flight simulator.

 

The Dream Chaser ETA’s Californian vacation marks the beginning of a number of key milestones in her goal of becoming the crew transport for NASA astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS).

 

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Hale: Logistics Key To Deep Space Human Exploration, and Commercial Space Is The Answer

Former NASA space shuttle program manager Wayne Hale told the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Science and Space Thursday that it is difficult for his generation to change its “mental model” of the NASA-funded Apollo program as the way for humans to explore space.   The reality today, he stressed, is that the government and the commercial sector must team together and leverage each other’s capabilities because taxpayers are only willing to spend half-a-percent of the federal budget on NASA, not the 3-4 percent in the Apollo era.

 

 

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Dream Chaser Readies, Gets Set For Flight Testing

Dream Chaser Readies, Gets Set For Flight Testing | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

It was surely one of those moments where NASA could hardly wait to tear off the shrink wrap. Sierra Nevada Corp.’s privately constructed Dream Chaser spacecraft engineering test article arrived at the Dryden Flight Research Center last week — wrapped in plastic for shipping protection — ahead of some flight and runway tests in the next few months.

 

“The captive-carry flights will further examine the loads it will encounter during flight as it is carried by an Erickson Skycrane helicopter. The free flight later this year will test Dream Chaser’s aerodynamics through landing."

 

 

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CAEXI BEST's curator insight, May 23, 2013 9:55 PM
Readies Dream Chaser, se prépare pour les essais en vol
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NATHELIE STRENG: Commercializing space travel.

Nathelie Streng of SXC, Space Exploration Curacao.

Stratocumulus's insight:

Nathelie is obviously not a rocket scientist and apparently no one ever explained to her about the Space Shuttle's three main liquid-fueled engines, but still she does a good job in using her hands while depicting complex aeronautical manuevers.

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NASA Funds 3D Pizza Printer

NASA Funds 3D Pizza Printer | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

NASA has doled out a research grant to develop a prototype 3D printer for food, so astronauts may one day enjoy 3D-printed pizza on Mars.

 

Anjan Contractor, a senior mechanical engineer at Systems and Materials Research Corporation (SMRC), based in Austin, Texas, received a $125,000 grant from the space agency to build a prototype of his food synthesizer, as was first reported by Quartz.

 

NASA hopes the technology may one day be used to feed astronauts on longer space missions, such as the roughly 520 days required for a manned flight to Mars. Manned missions to destinations deeper in the solar system would require food that can last an even longer amount of time.

 

 

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Big Meteor Explosion on Moon Shows Lunar Exploration Risks

Big Meteor Explosion on Moon Shows Lunar Exploration Risks | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The dramatic meteorite strike that blasted out a big crater on the moon two months ago shows just how perilous manned lunar exploration can be.

 

A 1-foot-wide (0.3 meters) rock slammed into the lunar surface at 56,000 mph (90,120 km/h) on March 17, creating a fresh crater 65 feet (20 m) wide. The crash caused the biggest and brightest explosion scientists have seen since they started monitoring lunar meteorite strikes in 2005.

 

"The flash was so bright it saturated the camera," said Bill Cooke, head of the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The lunar blast was the equivalent of 5 tons of TNT going off, scientists said.

 

 

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NASA, Bigelow to Discuss Private Sector Space Exploration Effort | Parabolic Arc

NASA, Bigelow to Discuss Private Sector Space Exploration Effort | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) – NASA and Bigelow Aerospace of Las Vegas are holding a media availability at 1:30 p.m. EDT, Thursday, May 23, to discuss the agency’s Space Act Agreement with the company for its insight on collaborating with commercial industry on exploration beyond Earth orbit. Journalists can participate in-person or by teleconference.

 

Under the agreement, Bigelow will work with a variety of commercial space companies to assess and develop options for innovative and dynamic private and public investments to create infrastructure to support domestic and international governmental exploration activities alongside revenue generating private sector enterprises. Bigelow will deliver its analysis by the end of this year.

 

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Lyle Upson's comment, May 21, 2013 7:13 AM
really good to see the discussion going in this direction
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Future of Spaceflight: XCOR's Doug Jones Talks with Reason's Brian Doherty

If you've ever dreamed of soaring to the stars, liftoff may be coming sooner than you think. Just ask XCOR's Chief Test Engineer Doug Jones, who has designed a commercial suborbital spaceship that can fly up to four times a day, six days a week - sort of like an airplane.

And for the low, low price of $95,000, you too can have a ticket to ride.

Reason's Brian Doherty interviewed Jones live from Reason TV's LA Studios.

 

 

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Lyle Upson's comment, May 21, 2013 7:18 AM
do we yet know if a single craft can make that many flights per day/week ???
Stratocumulus's comment, May 21, 2013 7:49 PM
Agreed. Presently their daily flight goals do seem a tad ambitious.
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Space Florida launch at Shiloh: Jobs trump rattlesnakes | Headline Surfer

OAK HILL -- Last Tuesday, Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana spoke in support of the Space Florida proposal for development of a private space launch facility on NASA-owned land near the abandoned orange grove community of Shiloh just north of the Brevard County line. NASA will postpone any final decision awaiting the results of an environmental impact study of the planned use of 150 acres out of the approximately 150,000 acres in the area shared by the Kennedy Space Center and the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge.

 

This is a shift in the position originally taken by NASA, which had earlier opposed the launch site. In my opinion, this shift was driven in part by the growing surge in popular and political support for the project best exemplified by the favorable resolution passed May 2nd by the Volusia County Council.

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X Prize Eyes New Contests for Spaceflight Innovation

X Prize Eyes New Contests for Spaceflight Innovation | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SAN MATEO, Calif. — The organization whose big-money prizes helped get the private spaceflight industry off the ground isn't done issuing high-profile challenges to spur exploration of the final frontier.

 

The nonprofit X Prize Foundation, which awarded $10 million to a groundbreaking private spaceship in 2004 and is currently offering $30 million in prize money for a private race to the moon, will be announcing further spaceflight challenges in the future, said Gregg Maryniak, the organization’s corporate secretary.

 

 

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Welcome to the Real Space Age

Welcome to the Real Space Age | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

... In New Mexico, workers are putting the finishing touches on the first of at least ten spaceports currently under construction around the world. More than 800 people have paid as much as $200,000 apiece to reserve seats on commercial flights into space, some of which are expected to launch, at long last, within a year. Space-travel agents are being trained; space suits are being designed for sex appeal as much as for utility; the founder of the Budget hotel chain is developing pods for short- and long-term stays in Earth’s orbit and beyond. Over beers one night, a former high-ranking NASA official, now employed by Sir Richard Branson of the Virgin transportation conglomerate, put it plainly: “We happen to be alive at the moment when humanity starts leaving the planet.”

 

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Vloasis's curator insight, May 20, 2013 11:28 PM

New Mexico has long held a kind of connection with space.  The red landscape, the clearness and closeness of the stars, the solitude.

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Differing perspectives on commercial crew | Space Politics

“If NASA had received the president’s requested funding for this program then,” Bolden said, referring to the rollout of the program three years ago, “we would not have been forced to recently sign a new contract with the Russians for Soyuz transportation.” Those earlier cuts, he said, have pushed back commercial crew to 2017, “and even this delayed availability is in question if Congress does not fully support the president’s 2014 request for our commercial crew program.

 

“Further delays in our commercial crew program and the impact on our human spaceflight program are unacceptable,” he said. “That’s why we need the full $821 million the president has requested in next year’s budget to keep us on track for our 2017 deadline.”

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Prepared Statement by Steven Collicott Senate Hearing on Commercial Spaceflight 16 May 2013 | SpaceRef

Prepared Statement by Steven Collicott Senate Hearing on Commercial Spaceflight 16 May 2013 | SpaceRef | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"I believe that we are beginning an era of low-cost, routine space access that will offer incredible new opportunities for the research community. Reusable commercial suborbital vehicles will allow researchers to fly payloads often, conduct more experiments and collect more data, for the price of one traditional launch vehicle. Payloads will have a gentler ride to space, resulting in reduced payload development cost and the opportunity to fly experiments that were prohibitively difficult to fly before. With short lead times, there will be opportunities to launch coincident with terrestrial and astronomical phenomena, providing astronomers and earth scientists telescope observation prospects from the edge of space. Some of the platforms will also fly researchers alongside their payloads, an exciting new addition to spacebased research that will provide flexibility that can only come from having an investigator in the loop, and reduce the need for expensive and error-prone automation. Like researchers on ocean-going vessels, in Antarctica, and on research aircraft, space-based researchers will be able to more effectively conduct their experiments when they fly with them to adapt to discovery and to acquire in-situ data."

 

 

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As NewSpace Prepares to Take Off, Will Congress Let NASA Get On Board?

As NewSpace Prepares to Take Off, Will Congress Let NASA Get On Board? | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Even if the proposed budget for Commercial Crew is slashed by its opponents in Congress yet again, such action will only delay the inevitable introduction of the first commercial, passenger carrying space transportation system, and it could even have the opposite effect. Either way, as public awareness of private spaceflight increases though the engine of marketing,  even Congress may reach the understanding that  a threshold has been passed, and that for NASA to maintain its current relevance, policy must be adjusted accordingly. One possible outcome,  mission planners wisely decide to  follow Wayne Hale’s conclusion, that commercial space is the key to affordable logistics for deep space exploration.  If that doesn’t happen,  the terms NASA and science fiction may take on a whole new meaning.

 

 

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China Media Claim Private Mars Colony Mission Is a Scam

China Media Claim Private Mars Colony Mission Is a Scam | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Some people may find it hard to believe that a private mission will succeed in landing four astronauts on Mars in 2023, but several state-run media outlets in China are targeting the project with even harsher terms like "hoax" and "hype."

 

Doubts have been growing in China about the legitimacy of Mars One, the Netherlands-based nonprofit that seeks to establish a colony on the Red Planet 10 years from now. China's People's Daily newspaper, for example, ran a story Tuesday (May 21) headlined "Settlement on Mars a hoax? Over 10,000 Chinese people fall for it."

 

The headline refers to the 10,000 people from China who have applied to become Mars One astronauts since the organization opened its selection process last month. (Mars One charges a non-refundable application fee that varies from nation to nation; it's $11 for Chinese applicants and $38 for United States citizens.)

 

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Revolutionary New Space-Diving Suit Will Rival Anything You’ve Ever Seen In The Movies

Revolutionary New Space-Diving Suit Will Rival Anything You’ve Ever Seen In The Movies | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Tony Stark has been to a lot of cool places in that Iron Man get-up of his. But low Earth orbit might still be a bit beyond his operational flight envelope. Not so for the developers of the revolutionary RL Mark VI Space Diving suit. A hi-tech ensemble consisting of augmented reality goggles, power gloves, control moment gyros, and a low-cost commercial space suit, the RL Mark VI will allow future thrill seekers and space tourists an experience that up until now could only be imagined in the boldest science fiction.

 

 

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Nancy Kay Novak's curator insight, May 23, 2013 8:57 AM

Very cool...

Solar System Express's comment, May 23, 2013 3:33 PM
Additional comment, questions, or investor can reach Sol-X at CTO@solarsystemexpress.com
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Dream Chaser unwrapped

Dream Chaser unwrapped | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Several Sierra Nevada Corporation employees recently unwrapped the Dream Chaser flight test vehicle following its five-state journey from Colorado to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in southern California. The prototype space access vehicle will undergo ground and approach-and-landing flight tests in the coming months at Dryden as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) development work. SNC is one of three companies working with CCP during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCap) initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers.

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3-D Printed Pizza to Feed Mars Colonists? | DNews

3-D Printed Pizza to Feed Mars Colonists? | DNews | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

One of the biggest challenges facing humanity in space is: how to cultivate food. Coincidentally, one of the biggest challenges facing the entire planet in the near future will be: how to cultivate enough food to support an ever-swelling population. Wouldn’t it be delicious if both challenges could be solved, or at least partially solved, using the same, open-source technology?

 

Enter the 3-D printer: your all-in-one solution to lunar habitat-building, gun-making and space pizza preparation! Now, the latter has grabbed the attention of NASA, which has approved a $125,000 grant for a mechanical engineer to develop a prototype of his universal food synthesizer based on 3-D printing technology.

 

 

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Washington is stinting NASA, as usual

Washington is stinting NASA, as usual | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Oh Washington, why do you toy with NASA so?

 

Back in 2009 President Obama convened the Augustine commission to provide a full overview of NASA’s human spaceflight program, and determine the best course of action to take. The committee’s principal finding was, simply, this: NASA’s budget should match its mission and goals.

 

Alas no one in Washington bothered to listen to this advice, then or now.

 

 

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NASA Astronauts Fly Dream Chaser Simulations May 15-17

Jack Fischer was one of four NASA astronauts to fly approach and landing simulations of Sierra Nevada Corporation's Dream Chaser spacecraft at the agency's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The three-day simulations evaluated the spacecraft's subsonic handling in support of NASA Commercial Crew Program efforts

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Spaceport Georgia | Columbus Ledger Enquirer

Spaceport Georgia | Columbus Ledger Enquirer | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Georgia is ideally situated, in terms of both geography and infrastructure, to locate a commercial spaceport. Our southern latitude is important because spacecraft get an additional boost from Earth's rotation the farther south they launch. Also, launching spacecraft over the ocean, rather than heavily populated land areas, reduces the risk. Where can you find a southeastern coastline? Georgia. These geographical assets are further enhanced with barge access to the Atlantic, a superior interstate system, and the world's busiest airport nearby. Combine these benefits with a population of 85,000 aerospace workers in the state and an outstanding university system to train and enhance the next generation workforce, and Georgia presents a highly attractive package for space entrepreneurs. Few people today realize that in 1960, when NASA was looking for a site to launch rockets, Georgia was on the short list for many of these reasons.


Read more here: http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/2013/05/18/2507383/spaceport-georgia.html#storylink=cpy

 

 

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Scaled Blowed Up Rocket Engine Real Good on Friday | Parabolic Arc

Scaled Blowed Up Rocket Engine Real Good on Friday | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Scaled Composites conducted a static fire of an engine on Friday that startled everyone who heard it at the Mojave Air and Space Port the other day. The nozzle and engine casing ended up separated from the test rig and was on the floor outside the small fence that surrounds the test site.

 

Scaled says that is exactly what they planned to do. The company is describing it as a “a non-flight experimental rocket motor in which flaws had been intentionally introduced to improve knowledge of different design components. Tested experimental grain to destruction. This unique test, which was necessary to perform during the test program, successfully collected data for several key safety systems.”

 

 

Stratocumulus's insight:

Doug Messier. Ever the comedian.

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Futures imperfect | The Space Review

Futures imperfect | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

At the risk of over-generalizing, there are two broad points of view among space enthusiasts about the future of American human spaceflight. One group looks at NASA’s inability to go beyond Earth orbit in the last four decades, looks at the numerous policy collapses like the Space Exploration Initiative and the Vision for Space Exploration, and considers the current lack of clearly defined goals and destinations and the resources to actually venture outward, and gets depressed. Another group looks at the rise of “commercial space,” at the Bigelow inflatable habitats and the announced plans for asteroid mining and, above all, the latest press releases from SpaceX, and concludes that the future is so bright that we gotta wear shades. In their view, humans will be landing on Mars perhaps within fifteen years wearing corporate logo polo shirts and drawing the shape of the dollar sign in the pink sky while flipping the bird at the oppressive NASA bureaucracy.

 

But I try to be as analytical as possible about the present: the glass is neither half full nor half empty; it is a 16 ounce glass containing 8 ounces of water. And when it comes to trying to imagine the future of human spaceflight, I watch movies.

Stratocumulus's insight:

Europa? Maybe. The other two? Meh...

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Is NASA about jobs, or actually accomplishing something?

Is NASA about jobs, or actually accomplishing something? | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden had a rare (and welcome) availability with Houston area media on Thursday, and while he generally stuck to talking points, citing the space agency’s rosy future, moments of frustration slipped through the cracks.

 

These slips are illuminating as they point out a central weakness and strength of NASA — its 10 centers spread across eight states.

 

 

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Lyle Upson's comment, May 20, 2013 2:40 AM
another view point is that government pollies and bureaucrats will do what they will do, in this case SLS et al and the private sector will continue to grow ... two paths, one competent and the other not, but both can be supported
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Prepared Statement by Wayne Hale Senate Hearing on Commercial Spaceflight 16 May 2013 | SpaceRef

Prepared Statement by Wayne Hale Senate Hearing on Commercial Spaceflight 16 May 2013 | SpaceRef | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"Poised on the cusp of these new systems, we run the risk of being penny wise and pound foolish as we make the same mistake that doomed the space shuttle to much higher cost operations: starving a spacecraft development program in the name of saving a few pennies for today’s budget bottom line resulting in the compromised systems that, if they fly at all, will not be cheap enough to enable business in space…

 

"Currently, the commercial space effort stands uncomfortably close to the brink of financial starvation. Deep space transportation development is being stretched out by similar restrictions. Business is looking to see if the government is serious about providing the critical support or whether this effort will be wasted as so many earlier government programs which withered away on the very cusp of success: National Launch System, Orbital Space Plane, and others."

 

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