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23 Axe Apollo Fans with the Right Stuff Win Free Space Trips

23 Axe Apollo Fans with the Right Stuff Win Free Space Trips | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Twenty-three people are now the proud recipients of free trips to space and back again.

 

For the past week, more than 100 participants from over 60 countries around the world have taken part in mental aptitude tests, combat training in a fighter jet and zero-gravity flights to distinguish themselves as the most worthy of one for one of the coveted tickets to space with Space Expedition Corporation under a project by the makers of Axe Apollo body spray. SXC manages trips aboard the reusable XCOR Aerospace Lynx spacecraft, a commercial space plane that is expected to begin flying customers in 2014 or 2015.

 

 

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NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
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THAICOM 8 Hosted Webcast

On Friday, May 27th, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket delivered THAICOM 8, a commercial communications satellite for Thaicom, to a supersynchronous transfer orbit. Thaicom is one of Asia’s leading Asian satellite operators, influencing and innovating communications on a global scale.

SpaceX launched the THAICOM 8 from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

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After snags, BEAM space module expands to its full volume – like a bag of popcorn

After snags, BEAM space module expands to its full volume – like a bag of popcorn | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

It took almost eight hours, but NASA accomplished the first expansion of a pop-up module at the International Space Station today, by inflating the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM.

BEAM was built for NASA by Nevada-based Bigelow Aerospace under the terms of a $17.8 million contract. It was sent up to the station last month in the unpressurized trunk of a SpaceX Dragon cargo capsule. In its folded-up form, the cylinder-shaped module measures only 7 feet long, but when it’s pressurized with air, it can grow to twice its size.

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First-stage landing | Onboard camera

Sped up video of the Falcon 9 first-stage landing during the THAICOM 8 mission on May 27, 2016.

Stratocumulus's insight:

 

Just... Wow!

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, May 28, 7:31 PM
Falcon 9 first stage landing hits the bullseye.
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NASA to Televise Expansion Operations for Bigelow Expandable Activity

NASA to Televise Expansion Operations for Bigelow Expandable Activity | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace will make a second attempt at 9 a.m. EDT Saturday, May 28, to expand the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), currently attached to the International Space Station. NASA Television coverage will begin at 8:45 a.m.

During initial operations Thursday to expand BEAM, the module’s length and diameter did not increase with the increased internal pressure, as expected. Teams stood down from operations for the day and engineers depressurized the habitat Friday afternoon.

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SpaceX Falcon 9 booster leans in for a landing at sea after launching satellite

SpaceX Falcon 9 booster leans in for a landing at sea after launching satellite | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

For the third time in a row, a SpaceX Falcon 9 booster sent a payload into space and then came back for a landing on an oceangoing platform. But this time, the booster was a little shaken up.

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Elon Musk's Most Unexpected Success Is the SpaceX Live-Stream

Elon Musk's Most Unexpected Success Is the SpaceX Live-Stream | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

First, Elon Musk's SpaceX disrupted the aerospace industry with rockets that were designed to be reused. Now the company is turning heads with its Internet live-streams. 

SpaceX's live launch webcasts from the company's Mission Control in Hawthorne, Calif., are becoming must-watch events for space nerds and common folk alike. The events are an equally informative and entertaining crash course in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) topics with a heavy dose of rocket propulsion and flip maneuvers thrown in.

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Jeff Bezos says Blue Origin’s next spaceflight will test parachute failure

Jeff Bezos says Blue Origin’s next spaceflight will test parachute failure | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos predicts there’ll be a problem with a parachute the next time his Blue Origin venture flies its uncrewed New Shepard spaceship. He’ll make sure of it.

Flying with a bad parachute is part of Blue Origin’s plan to test the suborbital craft under stressful conditions, in preparation for flying passengers to the edge of outer space in as little as two years.

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SpaceX Falcon 9 recycles to Friday for Thaicom 8 launch | NASASpaceFlight.com

SpaceX Falcon 9 recycles to Friday for Thaicom 8 launch | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will attempt to make its twenty-fifth flight – and its second of the month – on Friday, deploying Thailand’s Thaicom 8 communications satellite. Liftoff from Cape Canaveral was moved to Friday, following a scrub during Thursday’s window due to “a tiny glitch in the motion of an upper stage engine actuator,” according to Elon Musk. “Probably not a flight risk, but still worth investigating.”

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ISS controllers defer BEAM module expansion | NASASpaceFlight.com

ISS controllers defer BEAM module expansion | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The International Space Station (ISS) was to gain a new module for the first time since March 2011 on Thursday, as the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) was to be expanded to its full size, bringing an end to an almost two-decade long effort to place an inflatable module on the station. However, the expansion process did not go to plan, resulting in further work being postponed.

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Planetary Resources’ asteroid miners focus on Earth observation with $21 million in new funding

Planetary Resources’ asteroid miners focus on Earth observation with $21 million in new funding | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

REDMOND, Wash. – Planetary Resources was founded as an asteroid mining company, but a fresh infusion of $21.1 million in investment puts the emphasis on a space frontier that’s closer to home: Earth observation.

“It leverages everything that we have been working on for the last several years … and it moves us forward in the direction of asteroid prospecting,” Planetary Resources’ president and CEO, Chris Lewicki, said this week during a tour of the company’s Redmond headquarters.

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Report endorses greater use of cubesats for science missions | SpaceNews.com

Report endorses greater use of cubesats for science missions | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — A National Academies report recommends that NASA and the National Science Foundation make greater use of cubesats for science missions, while also centralizing the management of NASA’s diverse cubesat efforts.

The report, prepared by a committee under the auspices of the National Academies’ Space Studies Board and released May 23, argued that cubesats represent a “disruptive innovation” whose capabilities continue to grow while remaining faster to develop and less expensive than more conventional spacecraft.

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Station Gets Ready to Expand BEAM | Space Station

Station Gets Ready to Expand BEAM | Space Station | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The final preparations are under way for Thursday morning’s expansion of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) from the Tranquility module. Back on Earth, a veteran cosmonaut and a pair of first time space flyers are getting ready for their mission in June.

NASA astronaut Jeff Williams performed leak checks and installed hardware to monitor and support BEAM expansion set to begin Thursday at 6:10 a.m. EDT (10:10 a.m. UTC). The expansion could potentially start earlier. NASA Television will broadcast the expansion activities live beginning at 5:30 a.m. Crew entry into BEAM, which has an expanded habitable volume of 565 cubic feet (16 cubic meters), is planned for June 2.

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Falcon 9 sails through customary preflight engine firing | Spaceflight Now

Falcon 9 sails through customary preflight engine firing | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket ignited its nine kerosene-fueled Merlin engines on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral on Tuesday evening in a critical milestone before liftoff with a commercial Thai communications satellite later in the week.

Held down by restraints at Cape Canaveral’s Complex 40 launch pad, the two-stage booster fired its engines for several seconds and throttled up to full power around 9 p.m. EDT Tuesday (0100 GMT Wednesday) to verify the Falcon 9 is ready for flight Thursday.

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Expanding Technology Aboard the ISS

At the International Space Station, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) was expanded to its full volumetric size May 28 through the introduction of air by the Expedition 47 crew onboard the station. BEAM, which was launched on a SpaceX/Dragon cargo craft April 8 and installed on the aft port of the Tranquility module April 16, is the first expandable component to be attached to the station and a prototype of structures that may be used in the future for habitats associated with deep space exploration. Measuring 11.6 x 10.5 feet, BEAM is expected to remain attached to the station for two years with crew members making occasional visits inside to check its systems.

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BEAM Successfully Expanded

BEAM Successfully Expanded | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"We are declaring manual inflation complete." Those words from CAPCOM Jessica Meir at Johnson Space Center's International Space Station (ISS) Mission Control at 4:10 pm EDT today brought to an end the lengthy process of expanding the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM). Air from the ISS was allowed into BEAM by astronaut Jeff Williams aboard the ISS opening a valve for prescribed periods of time -- often only one second long.

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, May 28, 7:22 PM
Bigelow's BEAM is now a fully inflated "room" on the ISS.
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Ride aboard the Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage on descent | Spaceflight Now

Ride aboard the Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage on descent | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Take a virtual trip from space back to planet Earth with an sped up video clip showing the eye-popping on-board views from the Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage booster Friday as it plummeted back to Earth, opened aerodynamic steering fins and fired its engines for a final braking maneuver just before touchdown.

The 156-foot-tall booster detached from the Falcon 9’s second stage less than three minutes after Friday’s liftoff from Cape Canaveral at 5:39 p.m. EDT (2139 GMT) with the Thaicom 8 communications satellite.

The video from a rocket-mounted camera shows the first stage opening four grid fins in an X-wing configuration for aerodynamic stabilization, then flipping around for a re-entry burn and a landing burn, targeting SpaceX’s drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You” in the Atlantic Ocean.

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SpaceX lands fourth booster after successful Falcon 9 launch

SpaceX lands fourth booster after successful Falcon 9 launch | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX on Friday landed its third consecutive rocket on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean, during a mission that successfully launched a commercial communications satellite to orbit.

“Falcon 9 has landed,” a member of SpaceX’s launch team confirmed about 10 minutes after a 230-foot Falcon 9 rocket's 5:39 p.m. blastoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

About 20 minutes later, the rocket's upper stage deployed the Thaicom 8 satellite in orbit as planned.

"All looks good," reported SpaceX CEO Elon Musk.

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SpaceX launches Thaicom-8, returns Falcon 9 first stage to offshore drone ship | SpaceNews.com

SpaceX launches Thaicom-8, returns Falcon 9 first stage to offshore drone ship | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 27 successfully placed the Thaicom-8 commercial telecommunications satellite into geostationary transfer orbit in the fifth of what SpaceX has said would be a year with up to 18 launches.

SpaceX and satellite builder Orbital ATK confirmed Thaicom-8’s successful separation in orbit. Orbital ATK said the satellite was sending signals post separation.

Operating from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the vehicle’s first stage returned to a successful landing on an offshore drone ship. It was the fourth successful recovery of a Falcon 9 first stage and the third consecutive drone-ship recovery. It was also the second successful drone-ship landing following a mission carrying a commercial satellite to geostationary-transfer orbit, which means handling higher speeds and temperatures as the stage turns around and heads back to Earth.

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SpaceX logs successful late afternoon launch for Thaicom | Spaceflight Now

SpaceX logs successful late afternoon launch for Thaicom | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

A Falcon 9 rocket took off from Cape Canaveral and climbed into space Friday, propelling a Thai television relay satellite into orbit and achieving its third dramatic ocean landing in a row, adding to SpaceX’s growing inventory of recovered rocket boosters.

Flying into crystal clear skies over Florida’s sun-splashed Space Coast, the 229-foot-tall (70-meter) Falcon 9 rocket slowly cleared Cape Canaveral’s Complex 40 launch pad on the power of nine kerosene-burning Merlin 1D main engines at 5:39 p.m. EDT (2139 GMT).

Running a day late to allow SpaceX to review a glitch in an upper stage engine actuator, the slender white launcher, topped with a bulbous aerodynamic shroud covering the Thaicom 8 communications satellite, tilted on an easterly trajectory over the Atlantic Ocean, bound for an equator-hugging geostationary transfer orbit.

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Stressing caution, SpaceX delays commercial satellite launch | Spaceflight Now

Stressing caution, SpaceX delays commercial satellite launch | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX scrubbed a launch Thursday to investigate a “tiny glitch” in an upper stage engine actuator on the company’s Falcon 9 rocket, delaying liftoff from Florida of a Thai communications satellite at least 24 hours.

The launch firm said managers delayed the launch until no earlier than Friday “out of an abundance of caution” to review data on the condition of the rocket.

Elon Musk, SpaceX’s founder and chief executive tweeted: “There was a tiny glitch in the motion of an upper stage engine actuator. Probably not a flight risk, but still worth investigating.”

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BEAM Expansion Terminated for the Day | Space Station

BEAM Expansion Terminated for the Day | Space Station | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Efforts to expand the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) were terminated for the day after several hours of attempts to introduce air into the module. Flight controllers informed NASA astronaut Jeff Williams that BEAM had only expanded a few inches in both length and diameter at the time the operation ceased for the day. Engineers are meeting to determine a forward course of action, with the possibility that another attempt could be made as early as Friday morning.

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Blue Origin preparing to land New Shepard with a bum parachute next time | SpaceNews.com

Blue Origin preparing to land New Shepard with a bum parachute next time | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — Blue Origin plans to find out if New Shepard can land with a failed parachute when it launches the suborbital spacecraft on its fourth round trip flight.

Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin’s founder, said May 26 the Kent, Washington-based company is finishing up mission planning for New Shepard’s fourth flight since the reusuable spacecraft touched down in Texas after reaching an altitude of 100.5 kilometers.

“On this upcoming mission we also plan to stress the crew capsule by landing with an intentionally failed parachute, demonstrating our ability to safely handle that failure scenario,” Bezos said in an email update. “It promises to be an exciting demonstration.”

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SpaceX ‘on track’ to launch astronauts in late 2017 | Spaceflight Now

SpaceX ‘on track’ to launch astronauts in late 2017 | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX is on schedule to fly two NASA astronauts on a test flight to the International Space Station by the end of 2017, but there is a lot of work to do to ensure the company’s new Crew Dragon spaceship is up to the task and ready in time, a SpaceX manager said Tuesday.

Benjamin Reed, director of SpaceX’s commercial crew program, said Tuesday that construction workers will install a crew access arm and other infrastructure for human spaceflights at Kennedy Space Center’s launch pad 39A this summer.

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More Space...in Space

More Space...in Space | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

BEAM will be deployed to its full size this Thursday, May 26, and begin its two-year technology demonstration attached to the space station. The astronauts aboard will first enter the habitat on June 2, and re-enter the module several times a year throughout the test period. While inside, they will retrieve sensor data and assess conditions inside the module.

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Why NASA is Hitching a ride on Red Dragon | SpaceNews Magazine

Why NASA is Hitching a ride on Red Dragon | SpaceNews Magazine | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

When NASA and SpaceX announced April 27 that they had modified an existing unfunded Space Act Agreement that involves the company’s “Red Dragon” Mars lander concept, it was, unsurprisingly, SpaceX that got all the attention. No company has ever flown a private Mars lander, and not even NASA has landed a spacecraft as large as SpaceX’s Dragon. Moreover, Red Dragon is the latest sign that SpaceX and its founder, Elon Musk, are serious about pursuing a long-term goal of Mars settlement.

But what’s in it for NASA? The answer might be summed up in two words: supersonic retropropulsion, a landing technology that the agency increasingly sees as critical to its own Mars goals.

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