The NewSpace Daily
Follow
Find
154.6K views | +95 today
 
Scooped by Stratocumulus
onto The NewSpace Daily
Scoop.it!

Antares Launch Report | Press site views of second Antares launch | Spaceflight Now

Antares Launch Report | Press site views of second Antares launch | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The second Orbital Sciences Corp. Antares rocket lifted off Wednesday at 10:58 a.m. EDT (1458 GMT) from launch pad 0A at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Virginia coast.

The 131-foot-tall rocket, powered by two Russian engines built for the Soviet moon program in the 1970s, made an Earth-rattling ascent into a clear, topaz sky, disappearing in the glare of the morning sun as it accelerated southeast from U.S. East Coast.

The rocket deployed the Orbital Sciences Cygnus spacecraft to begin a four-day chase of the International Space Station on a demo run for NASA's commercial cargo resupply program.

more...
No comment yet.
The NewSpace Daily
NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
Curated by Stratocumulus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Elon musk discusses Falcon 9 failure investigation


Listen to "Elon Musk discusses Falcon 9 failure investigation" by Spaceflight Now on SoundCloud.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

CSF Welcomes the NTSB’s SpaceShipTwo Accident Report and Remains Dedicated to Upholding Ever-Increasing Safety Standards | Commercial Spaceflight Federation


"Today the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) held a public hearing to adjudicate the probable cause of last year’s SpaceShipTwo test flight accident, which resulted in an in-flight breakup. NTSB’s investigators and analysts presented their findings, conclusions, and recommendations in a draft report to the NTSB Board members. Throughout the discussion, NTSB staff and Board members praised the industry’s strong commitment to transparency and cooperation during the investigation, which helped lead to a more timely and complete resolution of the accident investigation.

"'We cannot undo the unfortunate events that transpired last October,' said CSF President Eric Stallmer, 'but we will successfully apply, and in some cases have already applied, the lessons learned to make our entire industry better and safer as a result.'"


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceShipTwo mishap due to pilot error and company training oversight | Spaceflight Now

SpaceShipTwo mishap due to pilot error and company training oversight | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


The fatal in-flight breakup of Virgin Galactic’s futuristic SpaceShipTwo rocket plane during a test flight last October was the result of pilot error, possibly triggered by a high workload, unfamiliar vibration and rapid acceleration, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded Tuesday.

But the NTSB also found that the pilot’s misstep was at least partially the fault of spaceplane builder Scaled Composites, which failed to fully recognize and address the consequences of critical single-point human failures, trusting pilots to properly perform without a full understanding of those consequences.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NTSB issues findings in Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo tragedy | GeekWire

NTSB issues findings in Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo tragedy | GeekWire | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Pilot error, an in-flight braking system that wasn’t sufficiently fail-safe, and lapses in training and the regulatory process contributed to the fatal breakup of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo rocket plane during a test flight last October, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Tuesday’s findings, issued in conjunction with an NTSB hearing on the accident in Washington, D.C., mark the end of the agency’s nine-month-long investigation – and close a dark chapter in Virgin Galactic’s decade-long effort to send passengers to the edge of space. The company says it’s addressing the factors raised during the investigation as it builds a second SpaceShipTwo in a hangar at California’s Mojave Air and Space Port.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Clyde Space CEO Greg Clark on How OnWeb and SpaceX are Transforming the Space Industry | YouTube

Craig Clark, founder and CEO of Scotland’s Clyde Space Ltd., gives his views on the small satellite market and innovations like OneWeb’s planned mega-constellation venture.

“OneWeb and SpaceX, with their constellations, they’re just getting up there and doing it,” Clark said in an interview during the UK Space Conference in Liverpool July 13-15. “I think we’ll see a massive shift in the way we do space in the future.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Saving Spaceship Dragon – Software to provide contingency chute deploy | NASASpaceFlight.com

Saving Spaceship Dragon – Software to provide contingency chute deploy | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


SpaceX CEO and Chief Designer Elon Musk has ordered the installation of contingency abort software into all future Dragon cargo spacecraft, providing them with an option to deploy their parachutes after an off-nominal launch scenario. Such software may have allowed the CRS-7 Dragon to save herself after she was thrown free of the failing Falcon 9 during June’s ill-fated launch.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NTSB Ready To Vote on Final Report on SpaceShipTwo Crash

NTSB Ready To Vote on Final Report on SpaceShipTwo Crash | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will meet in public session on Tuesday, July 28, to deliberate and vote on its report on the probable cause of the October 31, 2014 SpaceShipTwo (SS2) crash. The meeting begins at 9:30 am ET and will be webcast on the NTSB website.

The NTSB ordinarily has five members, but there is one vacancy at the moment. The Tuesday meeting is an opportunity for all four members to hear from the NTSB staff at the same time about their findings, conclusions and recommendations. The Board members have had access to factual reports and draft staff reports already, but this is the formal unveiling and opportunity for debate. The Board will vote to adopt or modify the staff's draft. The Board can make changes to the recommendations, although an NTSB spokesman told SpacePolicyOnline. com on Friday that typically they add or suggest rewordings to staff-developed recommendations rather than making wholesale changes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Safety Panel Commends NASA For ISS Cargo Planning | SpaceNews.com

Safety Panel Commends NASA For ISS Cargo Planning | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


WASHINGTON — Members of NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) said the agency has done a good job dealing with the loss of three cargo missions to the International Space Station in eight months.

“The cumulative effect of the three cargo mission losses are, in our opinion, significant, but the ISS program was well positioned to mitigate the impacts,” said ASAP member Brent Jett, a former astronaut, at a July 23 meeting of the panel at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia.

Jett said a few key pieces of station hardware lost of those missions “put the ISS in a little bit of a tough position.” That included filtration beds for the station’s water processing system, two of which were lost on the October failure of a Cygnus cargo spacecraft and two more on the June failure of a Dragon cargo spacecraft. Jett said that NASA was able to procure replacement filtration beds that will fly on a Japanese H-2 Transfer Vehicle mission launching to the station in August.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

How Outer Space is Becoming the Next Internet

How Outer Space is Becoming the Next Internet | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Just like the personal computer paved the way for a new category of software companies or Amazon Web Services spawned scores of cloud applications, private spacecraft is the infrastructure enabling businesses that never before could have existed. Amazon.com founderJeff Bezos even has his own space company, Blue Origin, which flew its first successful test flight in April.


Combine that with the rapid growth of cloud computing, big data analytics, the collapse in prices for electronic components in mobile devices and a thriving ecosystem of coders, and suddenly space is attainable and affordable.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Aerospace Corp. is Thinking Big on Small Satellites | SpaceNews.com

Aerospace Corp. is Thinking Big on Small Satellites | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


The Aerospace Corp. did not set out to establish an organization focused on designing and building miniature satellites. During the late 1990s and early 2000s, engineers who began building spacecraft weighing a few kilograms or even less worked in multiple departments. That changed in 2007 when the company established its Mechanics Research Department.

“At the time, the Mechanics Research Department seemed like a good home for microsatellite activity,” said Richard Welle, who led the department and now serves as Microsatellite Systems Department director. “Then the microsatellite activity just outpaced everything else in that department.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Intelsat Asks FCC To Block SpaceX Experimental Satellite Launch | SpaceNews.com

Intelsat Asks FCC To Block SpaceX Experimental Satellite Launch | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — Satellite fleet operator Intelsat asked U.S. regulators to block a SpaceX launch of two small satellites to test technologies for a future low-orbiting Internet-delivery constellation, claiming SpaceX has refused to disclose sufficient information relating to potential frequency interference and collision risk.

SpaceX has apparently accepted at least part of Intelsat’s argument and has disclosed specific data on how its satellites will avoid interference with Intelsat and other geostationary-satellite fleet operators.

Hawthorne, California-based SpaceX is in the early phase of development of a constellation of small satellites – as many as 4,000, company Chief Executive Elon Musk has said – to speed the transport of large chunks of data around the world, avoding the detours and bottlenecks of terrestrial fiber networks.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

A competitor is trying to force SpaceX to reveal its secret satellite internet plans

A competitor is trying to force SpaceX to reveal its secret satellite internet plans | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Intelsat has asked US telecom regulators to reveal confidential parts of SpaceX’s application to fly experimental internet satellites, citing fears of orbital gridlock.

In the objection, Intelsat, a European firm that operates a major global satellite network, says it doesn’t understand “how the proposed [SpaceX satellites] could operate on a non-interference basis or meet the requirement to avoid collision with other satellites.” The company also filed a Freedom of Information Act request to reveal the confidential information, which includes technical details on SpaceX’s antennae, ground stations and “power flux density.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

First flight of Falcon Heavy delayed again | Spaceflight Now

First flight of Falcon Heavy delayed again | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


SpaceX has slowed development of the Falcon Heavy rocket, a mega-booster made of three Falcon 9 booster cores strapped together, as the company recovers from a launch failure last month, delaying the new rocket’s inaugural flight until early 2016.

“Given our focus on Falcon 9, we’ve de-prioritized Falcon Heavy to probably launch in the spring next year, maybe April or so,” SpaceX chief executive Elon Musk told reporters Monday.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NTSB SpaceShipTwo findings will serve to strengthen our resolve – Branson | NASASpaceFlight.com

NTSB SpaceShipTwo findings will serve to strengthen our resolve – Branson | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has provided details into the probable cause of the SpaceShipTwo failure during last year’s test flight. The investigation found co-pilot error and procedural issues relating to the SS2’s feather system were to blame. With the investigation now closed, Virgin Galactic are building a new spacecraft with modifications to mitigate a repeat issue.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NTSB Concludes Accident Investigation

NTSB Concludes Accident Investigation | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


"Today, a team of impartial experts at the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) concluded their thorough investigation of the in-flight breakup of SpaceShipTwo during a test flight on October 31, 2014. In a public hearing held at the NTSB’s headquarters in Washington, DC, the organization’s experts and board members discussed their findings from the investigation.

"As our founder, Richard Branson, said: 'While it is good to have passed this milestone and be able to focus on the future, we are acutely aware that it does not alter the fact that this was at heart a human tragedy. Our thoughts go out again today to the family, friends and colleagues of Mike Alsbury.'"


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NTSB Blames Pilot Error, Lack of Planning for SpaceShipTwo Accident | SpaceNews.com

NTSB Blames Pilot Error, Lack of Planning for SpaceShipTwo Accident | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


WASHINGTON — The accident that destroyed the SpaceShipTwo suborbital vehicle and killed one its pilots last year was caused by the co-pilot’s premature unlocking of the vehicle’s feathering system and inability of its developer, Scaled Composites, to foresee such an event and take measures to prevent it, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) concluded July 28.

The NTSB, during a public meeting at its headquarters here, accepted a report regarding the Oct. 31 accident that also criticized the Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation for rushing to approve the vehicle’s experimental permit application without properly scrutinizing its safety issues.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NTSB: Scaled's Failure To Protect Against Human Error Led to Loss of SpaceShipTwo

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) voted on Tuesday to adopt its final report on the October 31, 2014 SpaceShipTwo (SS2) accident that killed one of the spaceplane's two pilots.  The Board agreed to 17 findings and 10 recommendations, along with a statement of probable cause that focused on the failure of Scaled Composites to "consider and protect against" the possibility that a single human error could doom the vehicle and its crew.

SS2 broke apart during a flight test over the Mojave Desert killing co-pilot Michael Alsbury.  The pilot, Peter Siebold, survived after being thrown clear of the spaceplane unconscious.  He regained consciousness during the fall to Earth and was able to detach himself from his seat and his parachute opened automatically.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Cutting the costs of a human return to the Moon | The Space Review

Cutting the costs of a human return to the Moon | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Governments have largely deferred plans for human missions to the Moon, citing their cost, while private ventures offer more affordable concepts but struggle to raise funding. Jeff Foust reports on a new study that argues that a combination of the two, through public-private partnerships, could reduce the cost of human missions by as much as an order of magnitude.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Domes Arrive for CST-100 Test Article Assembly | Commercial Crew Program

Domes Arrive for CST-100 Test Article Assembly | Commercial Crew Program | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


The first two domes that will form the pressure shell of the Structural Test Article, or STA, for Boeing’s CST-100 spacecraft have arrived at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The STA Crew Module will be assembled inside the former space shuttle hangar, known as Orbiter Processing Facility-3, so the company can validate the manufacturing and processing methods it plans to use for flight-ready CST-100 vehicles. While the STA will not fly with people aboard, it will be used to determine the effectiveness of the design and prove its escape system during a pad abort test. The ability to abort from an emergency and safely carry crew members out of harm’s way is a critical element for NASA’s next generation of crew spacecraft.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Report Argues Commercial Partnerships can Slash Costs of Human Lunar Missions | SpaceNews.com

Report Argues Commercial Partnerships can Slash Costs of Human Lunar Missions | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


WASHINGTON — A new report concludes that public-private partnerships, like those NASA has used in its commercial cargo and crew programs, could return humans to the moon for as little as $10 billion and within seven years.

The 100-page study, funded by NASA, concluded that an “evolvable lunar architecture” could eventually lead to a permanent human base at the lunar poles to convert water ice there for propellant that could be sold to NASA or other customers. However, those involved in the study acknowledge that the biggest obstacle to this approach may be convincing policymakers of the plan’s effectiveness.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SES’s 2016 Outlook Clouded by Falcon 9 Failure | SpaceNews.com

SES’s 2016 Outlook Clouded by Falcon 9 Failure | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


PARIS — Satellite fleet operator SES on July 24 said the rapid rise in the U.S. dollar has been good news for its revenue and profit but bad news for certain customers operating in developing nations.

Luxembourg-based SES also said it could not provide a forecast of 2016 revenue until SpaceX sets a firm date for the launch of the large SES-9 satellite.

Originally scheduled for mid-2015, then delayed to September earlier this year, the satellite’s launch has now slipped into to-be-determined category since the June 28 failure of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

How One Woman Is Democratizing the Final Frontier

How One Woman Is Democratizing the Final Frontier | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


"The co-founder and president of Escape Dynamic, Laetitia Garriott de Cayeux is a true role model of business leadership in science & technology. Escape Dynamics is building an electromagnetically-powered space launch system that will enable reusable single-stage-to-orbit spaceplanes, and plans to reduce costs of access to space by 100x for small payloads. They will do this by abandoning the path that all chemical rockets have used for the last 50 years, and instead will beam energy wirelessly to the rocket from ground to space," says Azam Shaghaghi, the President of Space Tourism Society of Canada, who had the rare opportunity to sit down with Laetitia during the International Space Development Conference 2014.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Intelsat to FCC: For the love of satellites, STOP ELON MUSK!

Intelsat to FCC: For the love of satellites, STOP ELON MUSK! | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Elon Musk wants to use his commercial SpaceX rockets to put satellites into orbit that will bring broadband to the next billion, but one of SpaceX's own customers has thrown a wrench into the works.

Musk's plan involves encircling the globe with a few thousand high-capacity, low-latency satellites that the Tesla Motors boss says should be able to deliver broadband internet at speeds comparable to optical fibre.

But Musk isn't the only one with an internet-in-space scheme. Richard Branson-backed OneWeb has a similar idea, as does Luxembourg's Intelsat – and here's where things get dicey.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Rival Claims SpaceX Internet Satellites Could Block Its Own

Rival Claims SpaceX Internet Satellites Could Block Its Own | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Satellite internet provider Intelsat has asked the Federal Communications Commission to reject an application from Elon Musk’s private space company SpaceX for permission to test its proposed satellite internet service.

SpaceX hopes to build a large constellation of small, low earth orbit satellites capable of blanketing the globe in wireless internet coverage. Such a service would obviously be a threat to Intelsat’s existing business model. But at the moment, Intelsat’s concerns are technological. It’s worried that SpaceX’s experimental satellites could interrupt its own services and is asking the FCC to require SpaceX to disclose more information about its plans, even though the company has requested to keep much of this information confidential.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

XCOR To Raise Ticket Prices for Suborbital Flights | SpaceNews.com

XCOR To Raise Ticket Prices for Suborbital Flights | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


SAN JOSE, Calif. — XCOR Aerospace, a company developing a two-seat suborbital spaceplane for tourism and research applications, plans to raise its ticket prices by 50 percent next year, the company announced July 16.

The company, currently based in Mojave, California, but in the process of moving to Midland, Texas, said that the price of tickets for flights on its Lynx vehicle will increase from $100,000 to $150,000 effective Jan. 1, 2016.

“With the Lynx Mark I spacecraft closer to completion and first flight, the price will be raised to align more closely with the current market value of a commercial spaceflight,” said XCOR Space Expeditions, the Amsterdam-based subsidiary of XCOR Aerospace that serves as the sales office for Lynx tickets.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

CRS-7 Investigation Update

CRS-7 Investigation Update | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


On June 28, 2015, following a nominal liftoff, Falcon 9 experienced an overpressure event in the upper stage liquid oxygen tank approximately 139 seconds into flight, resulting in loss of mission. This summary represents an initial assessment, but further investigation may reveal more over time.

more...
No comment yet.