The NewSpace Daily
184.9K views | +88 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Stratocumulus
onto The NewSpace Daily
Scoop.it!

The budget battle at NASA | Behind The Black

"Smith and the committee are making it clear that if they need to cut anything, they are going to cut the funds to the commercial space program. This is the program that is providing the U.S. three different commercial systems for getting humans into space, and doing it for about $3 billion total, over the entire life of the program. This is also the program that will likely accomplish this within the next five years, and then be able to provide us routine manned flights to low Earth orbit on a regular basis, repeatedly, for relatively very little additional money.

 

"Instead, these politicians want continue the funding for the Space Launch System (SLS), which is costing us about $3 billion per year, and will only fly its first manned mission in 2021, at the earliest. And even if that first manned mission comes sooner, SLS will only be able to fly once every few years, at the most.

 

"This choice by Congress illustrates several things. First, they have no interest in saving money. They want to fund the pork in their districts, at high levels, and this is best provided by SLS.

 

"Second, they have no interest in getting Americans back into space. Even if SLS finally flies in 2021 — something I seriously doubt — it will not provide us with a practical and cost effective ferry for getting humans to and from ISS, as these Congressmen seem to think. It costs too much to fly. ISS needs a cheap and efficient ferry. SLS can’t do that.

 

"Finally, the decision by Congress to favor SLS means that there will be little money for NASA’s planetary program, unless Congress makes believe that money grows on trees, and funds it anyway. And sadly, that is apparently what they are doing, based on the information in the first story above. The Senate is funding everything.

 

"In the end, nothing will get funded. In the end, this whole charade will fall apart, and the American nation will find that it can do nothing. It will be bankrupt. And this will happen because of a refusal by the American people, and their representatives in Congress, to face reality and deal with it maturely, as adults."

 

more...
Lyle Upson's comment, March 13, 2013 9:54 PM
SLS to ISS is akin to breaking up a street fight with a tactical nuclear warhead ... ha ha ha, your pollies have all developed stupidity, ha ha ha ... meanwhile before the first launch of SLS to ISS, the 3 players in the game will all have delivered their human payloads several or more times ... this said, SLS with a planned future goes ignored ... ha ha ha
Lyle Upson's comment, March 13, 2013 10:15 PM
oh yeah, lets not mention that commercial crew not only gets US back to the ISS, but more importantly, creates an industrial base for expanding space activity
Stratocumulus's comment, March 13, 2013 10:52 PM
Yes. It's truly amazing what some people can get away with, merely by winning an election.
The NewSpace Daily
NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
Curated by Stratocumulus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Simulators Offer Astronauts Glimpse of Future Flight

NASA Commercial Crew astronauts Eric Boe and Suni Williams practiced mission operations for Boeing's CST-100 Starliner using a part-task trainer designed to mimic the controls and behavior of the spacecraft. They are part of a suite of cloud-based and hands-on trainers that Boeing has built to prepare astronauts and mission controllers. The trainers will be shipped to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston this year so astronauts can use them daily to practice numerous situations from normal operations to unlikely emergencies. The Starliner is one of two spacecraft in development in partnership with NASA's Commercial Crew Program that will enable astronauts to fly to the International Space Station on a new generation of spacecraft made in America and launching from Florida's Space Coast. Working at Boeing's St. Louis facility, Boe and astronaut Suni Williams ran through numerous mission phases to assess the simulators.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

U.S. Space sues Orbital ATK over ViviSat venture | SpaceNews.com

U.S. Space sues Orbital ATK over ViviSat venture | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — Orbital ATK is facing a lawsuit from its former partner in the ViviSat satellite servicing venture, claiming Orbital improperly shut down the joint venture to pursue the servicing business on its own.

In a suit filed April 29 with the Supreme Court of the State of New York, U.S. Space LLC alleges that Orbital ATK violated the terms of a management agreement regarding operations of ViviSat to take control of the company and dissolve it in April, a maneuver U.S. Space called in court filings “a double-cross of cosmic proportions.” The lawsuit was first reported by the legal publication Law360.

U.S. Space and ATK Space Systems created ViviSat in 2010 to develop and commercialize a satellite servicing system later known as the Mission Extension Vehicle (MEV). Under the original teaming agreement, ATK was primarily responsible for technical development of the MEV, while U.S. Space was responsible for financing and business development.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

The US should challenge the EU to lead lunar development | The Space Review

The US should challenge the EU to lead lunar development | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

As ESA seeks to drum up support for its “Moon Village” concept, the US appears content to focus instead on missions to Mars. Vid Beldavs, in an open letter to the president, argues that the US should push Europe to take the lead on lunar development and take on a supporting role that can help support its own Mars ambitions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

An overview of the American Space Renaissance Act (part 2) | The Space Review

An overview of the American Space Renaissance Act (part 2) | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

In the second part of his comprehensive review of a new space policy bill, Michael Listner examines the civil space portion of the act, including changes to how a NASA administrator is chosen.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

OneWeb Could Make 100% Broadband Coverage to Remote Canadian Communities Available and Affordable | SpaceRef Canada

OneWeb Could Make 100% Broadband Coverage to Remote Canadian Communities Available and Affordable | SpaceRef Canada | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The CRTC is currently holding hearings on the topic of reliable, affordable broadband Internet. For the majority of Canadians, access to broadband is not an issue. However for many, especially in rural and northern areas, access and affordability is a big issue. OneWeb explained the key technical issues and provided some suggestions on how the Government might want to move forward.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Hold-down test firing complete for next SpaceX launch | Spaceflight Now

Hold-down test firing complete for next SpaceX launch | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX technicians are attaching a Japanese communications satellite to the top of a Falcon 9 rocket ahead of a planned launch Thursday morning from Cape Canaveral.

The JCSAT 14 communications satellite, made in California by Space Systems/Loral, is fueled and encapsulated inside the Falcon 9 rocket’s payload fairing. Workers were expected to connect the satellite with the launcher’s second stage inside the Falcon 9 hangar as soon as Monday.

The rocket passed a key preflight test Sunday evening, when SpaceX’s launch team fueled the Falcon 9 with super-chilled kerosene and liquid oxygen and fired its nine Merlin 1D first stage engines for several seconds at Cape Canaveral’s Complex 40 launch pad.

Hold-down restraints kept the rocket on the ground during the brief static fire test, a customary all-up check of the Falcon 9 and its ground systems before the real countdown begins.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX's new price chart illustrates performance cost of reusability | SpaceNews.com

SpaceX's new price chart illustrates performance cost of reusability | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — Launch-service provider SpaceX’s new price chart shows the performance cost incurred when making the Falcon 9 Full Thrust and Falcon Heavy rockets partially reusable.

The corresponding cost and price benefit, which SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell has said could give customers around a 30 percent discount over expendable versions, is not yet listed in the price chart. Prices are shown as $62 million for the Falcon 9 Full Thrust and $90 million for the Falcon Heavy.

SpaceX has said it needs to thoroughly examine several Falcon 9 first stages on their return to the drone ships or ground landing pads before settling on a pricing structure. Final prices will also depend on SpaceX’s ability to ramp up its launch rhythm.

For now, the listed prices for the reusable and expendable versions remain the same.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX rocket preparing for late-night satellite launch

SpaceX rocket preparing for late-night satellite launch | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX this week is preparing for a late-night launch of a Falcon 9 rocket and Japanese communications satellite from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

As of late Saturday, liftoff with the JCSAT-14 satellite owned by SKY Perfect JSAT, Asia’s largest satellite operator, was planned around 1 a.m. Thursday, at the opening of a two-hour window at Launch Complex 40.

The mission aims to send the spacecraft built by Space Systems Loral to an orbit 22,300 miles above the equator, where it will deliver TV programming, broadband connections and mobile phone service in Japan, Asia, Oceania, Russia and the Pacific region for at least 15 years.

The mission is the first of two that SKY Perfect JSAT has booked on SpaceX's Falcon 9, to be followed by JCSAT-16.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

The Asteroid Miner’s Guide to the Galaxy

The Asteroid Miner’s Guide to the Galaxy | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

To evangelists of asteroid mining, the heavens are not just a frontier but a vast and resource-rich place teeming with opportunity. According to NASA, there are potentially 100,000 near-Earth objects — including asteroids and comets — in the neighborhood of our planet. Some of these NEOs, as they’re called, are small. Others are substantial and potentially packed full of water and various important minerals, such as nickel, cobalt, and iron. One day, advocates believe, those objects will be tapped by variations on the equipment used in the coal mines of Kentucky or in the diamond mines of Africa. And for immense gain: According to industry experts, the contents of a single asteroid could be worth trillions of dollars.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Changing The Way We Explore Space | NASA Watch

Changing The Way We Explore Space | NASA Watch | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

What you have seen this week is a paradigm shift hiding in plain sight. In September Elon Musk is going to reveal his plans for colonizing Mars. This announcement was just the opening note. A private sector company has committed to spend its own blood and treasure on a mission to another planet. They have not asked NASA for a penny for this mission and have offered to tell NASA what they have learned - for free. Meanwhile, NASA decided to cut its own research in an area of related technology that they deemed as being crucial for their own plans to send humans to Mars. In so doing they have taken a step back from Mars while SpaceX has taken a big step forward.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

A launch company, and industry, in transformation | The Space Review

A launch company, and industry, in transformation | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

United Launch Alliance found itself on the hot seat last month after a executive made controversial comments at a university seminar that leaked out. Jeff Foust reports that behind the controversy are insights into the transformation that company, and the broader launch industry, are undergoing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

An overview of the American Space Renaissance Act (part 1) | The Space Review

An overview of the American Space Renaissance Act (part 1) | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, Congressman Jim Bridenstine introduced a wide-ranging space policy bill. Michael Listner begins a three-part examination of its contents by looking at the section discussing military space issues.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX's new 360 video puts you on the drone ship as a rocket lands

SpaceX's new 360 video puts you on the drone ship as a rocket lands | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

This is something else.

An incredible new 360 video from Elon Musk's SpaceX puts you right on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean as the company's Falcon 9 rocket came in for its successful landing on April 8.

The new video shows everything from the rocking of the ship as the rocket comes down to the deployment of its landing legs just before touchdown.

And the roar of the rocket is deafening:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX undecided on payload for first Falcon Heavy flight | Spaceflight Now

SpaceX undecided on payload for first Falcon Heavy flight | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

As SpaceX engineers put together the first model of the company’s new Falcon Heavy rocket, officials have not ruled out flying a paying customer’s satellite aboard the maiden flight of the humongous launcher scheduled later this year, the company’s president told Spaceflight Now.

The long-awaited Falcon Heavy rocket could blast off on its first flight as soon as November from launch pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, returning the storied Apollo- and shuttle-era launch complex to service for the first time since the last space shuttle mission took off in 2011.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Stormy weather in Florida delays Falcon 9 launch | Spaceflight Now

Stormy weather in Florida delays Falcon 9 launch | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX has delayed a planned Falcon 9 launch with a Japanese communications satellite to Friday due to inclement weather on Florida’s Space Coast.

The launch window is unchanged, opening at 1:21 a.m. EDT (0521 GMT) and extending for two hours Friday, to put the JCSAT 14 commercial communications satellite into orbit for SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. of Tokyo.

The 229-foot-tall rocket could have been exposed to storms streaming over Central Florida on Wednesday if SpaceX went ahead with a launch attempt Thursday morning.

The Falcon 9 will blast off from Cape Canaveral’s seaside Complex 40 launch pad.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

A new chapter for a commercial space pioneer | The Space Review

A new chapter for a commercial space pioneer | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Jeff Greason and two other co-founders of XCOR Aerospace have left the company in recent months and started a new venture, Agile Aero. Jeff Foust reports on Agile’s vision for the future of space vehicle development, as well as where XCOR stands on its Lynx suborbital spaceplane.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX looks to future with new pad, USAF contract, and boost for Falcon | NASASpaceFlight.com

SpaceX looks to future with new pad, USAF contract, and boost for Falcon | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Following a banner week for what was once the new kid on the block, SpaceX has secured a coveted US Air Force launch contract in the same week the company announced a joint venture with NASA to send its Red Dragon human rated spacecraft to Mars in 2018 while also announcing new maximum performance margins for its flagship Falcon rockets.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

White House Wants DOT in Charge of Commercial Space "Mission Authorization"

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is proposing to Congress that the Department of Transportation (DOT) be placed in charge of "mission authorization" for new types of private sector space activities in earth orbit and beyond. The FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) has been floated as a likely candidate for this role for quite some time. The FAA is part of DOT.

The Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act (CSLCA) signed into law last November required OSTP to submit a report to Congress assessing current and near-term commercial activities in space. OSTP was also directed to recommend an approach for authorizing and continually supervising those activities as required by Article VI of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty. The term "mission authorization" now is used to refer to authorizing and supervising commercial on-orbit activities such as satellite servicing (including refueling, repair, or adding end-of-life extension modules to existing spacecraft), building orbital habitats, or extracting resources from the Moon or asteroids.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

White House report endorses FAA oversight of commercial space missions | SpaceNews.com

White House report endorses FAA oversight of commercial space missions | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — The White House has endorsed a proposal where the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration would provide oversight of “non-traditional” commercial space activities, eliminating a policy barrier for proposed missions beyond Earth orbit.

In a report submitted to Congress last month by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the administration said a “mission authorization” regime, with a minimal degree of government oversight, would ensure the U.S. upholds its obligations under the Outer Space Treaty of 1967.

“The economic vitality of the American space industry is best served with a clear and predictable oversight process that ensures access to space and imposes minimal burdens on the industry,” states the report. “The Administration supports a narrowly tailored authorization process for newly contemplated commercial space activities.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Haskell to Design-Build New Blue Origin Orbital Rocket Manufacturing Facility

Haskell to Design-Build New Blue Origin Orbital Rocket Manufacturing Facility | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

JACKSONVILLE, FL – Haskell, a leading integrated design, engineering and construction firm, announced today that it has been selected to design-build a new orbital rocket manufacturing facility for Blue Origin. The facility will be built at Exploration Park in Cape Canaveral, Florida – the hub of U.S. space exploration.

In 2015, Blue Origin announced plans to open a 21st century production facility that will focus on manufacturing a new fleet of reusable orbital launchers for their private spaceflight program. The facility is strategically located near Complex 36, the site where Blue Origin plans to launch from later this decade.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX completes static fire ahead of JCSAT-14 mission | NASASpaceFlight.com

SpaceX completes static fire ahead of JCSAT-14 mission | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX has completed a crucial static firing of their Falcon 9 rocket ahead of the upcoming mission to loft the JCSAT-14 satellite for the Tokyo-based SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation. The static fire took place late on Sunday at SLC-40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station ahead of a planned launch on Thursday, 5 May.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Space Invaders | Space KSC

Space Invaders | Space KSC | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

While NASA struggles to meet a November 2018 target date for launching its Space Launch System rocket Orion capsule on an uncrewed test flight around the Moon, SpaceX may have an uncrewed version of its Red Dragon on the way to Mars — at no cost to NASA.

Political implications abound.

How will the members of Congress who zealously protect SLS continue to rationalize the billions in pork wasted on the program, when SpaceX does it decades earlier for far cheaper?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Review: The Value of the Moon | The Space Review

Review: The Value of the Moon | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

ESA’s “Moon Village” concept is just the latest proposal in long-running efforts to develop viable, sustainable plans for a human return to the Moon. Jeff Foust reviews a book by a leading American lunar exploration advocate who argues that a return to the Moon should be rooted in efforts to make use of its resources to expand human presence beyond Earth.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Of India and ICBMs: two current concerns for American small-satellite launch | The Space Review

Of India and ICBMs: two current concerns for American small-satellite launch | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Developers of small launch vehicles in the US have recently raised two policy concerns: easier access by American satellite to Indian rockets, and the potential commercial use of excess ICBM motors. Cody Knipfer explores those issues and how they could influence the development of a new generation of commercial launchers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

First batch of Iridium Next satellites good to go for July SpaceX launch | SpaceNews.com

First batch of Iridium Next satellites good to go for July SpaceX launch | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — Mobile satellite services provider Iridium Communications on April 28 said the contracting team for its second-generation Iridium Next constellation had put past delays behind it and would be ready for a first launch of 10 satellites in late July aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

McLean, Virginia-based Iridium said the launch date could slip by a few weeks, depending on SpaceX’s management of its busy manifest. But satellite prime contractor Thales Alenia Space of France and Italy, and Orbital ATK of Dulles, Virginia, which is handling the satellites’ assembly, integration and test, will have 10 satellites ready for the July rendezvous.

Iridium said that by midsummer, the Iridium Next builders should be producing five Iridium Next satellites per month to meet Iridium’s aggressive schedule.

more...
No comment yet.