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Reality TV paves way for Neil Armstrong of Mars - space | New Scientist

Reality TV paves way for Neil Armstrong of Mars - space | New Scientist | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

To be the first to set foot on Mars may mean becoming a reality TV star. The Mars One project is in the running to send astronauts to the Red Planet in 2023, with the $6 billion mission paid for by selling global TV rights to their adventures, says Bas Lansdorp, the Dutch entrepreneur behind the plan.

 

It sounds wackier even than Inspiration Mars, but Lansdorp is serious. This week, he announced that Paragon Space Development of Tucson, Arizona, would design Mars One's space suits and life-support systems. Paragon is also on the Inspiration team, and the firm has completed life-support projects for NASA and some of its major suppliers.

 

 

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Elon Musk Reveals His Plan for Colonizing Mars

Elon Musk takes the stage of the 67th International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico on Sept. 27, it won’t be to rehash terrestrial concerns like a fatal Tesla autopilot crash or a poorly received merger proposal. Instead, the space and electric-car entrepreneur will be talking about realizing his boyhood dream: going to Mars.

Stratocumulus's insight:

 

The talk begins around 20:40. Enjoy.

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Different paths to Mars | The Space Review

Different paths to Mars | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Elon Musk will unveil his plans for human missions to Mars this week, but he’s not the only person talking about Mars exploration. Jeff Foust reports there’s a new emphasis on Mars mission planning, as other companies and organizations propose alternative approaches for getting humans to the Red Planet.

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SpaceX unveils Mars mission plans | SpaceNews.com

SpaceX unveils Mars mission plans | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk announced plans by his company to develop a large new launch vehicle and reusable spacecraft that could be ready to take large numbers of people to Mars as soon as the mid-2020s.

Musk, in a highly-anticipated speech at the International Astronautical Congress here that attracted an unusually raucous audience for a professional conference, said that SpaceX had made initial progress on those plans despite only a small fraction of the company working on the effort.

The “Interplanetary Transport System” announced by Musk involves the development of a large reusable booster that will launch a spaceship into low Earth orbit. That spaceship will be fueled by later booster launchers of tanker vehicles, then fly to Mars.

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Elon Musk wants to build a transit system that lets humans tour the entire Solar System

Elon Musk wants to build a transit system that lets humans tour the entire Solar System | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Elon Musk today announced plans for a giant rocket and spaceship that will theoretically be capable of sending humans to Mars. The theory, according to him, is that we could find a way to colonize Mars in just a century or two. In typical Musk fashion, he wasn't done there. During the latter stages of his presentation, the SpaceX CEO explained why he decided on Twitter a few weeks ago to rename the Mars Colonial Transporter to the "Interplanetary Transport System" — he wants the ITS to go so much farther beyond Mars. With a proposed 77-meter-tall rocket acting as a "javelin" for the massive ITS spaceship, Musk teased the idea of SpaceX spending centuries helping humans explore the outer reaches of the Solar System.

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SpaceX reveals ITS Mars game changer via colonization plan | NASASpaceFlight.com

SpaceX reveals ITS Mars game changer via colonization plan | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX’s Elon Musk has made his landmark speech, finally revealing details of his plans to make humanity a multiplanetary species. In a keynote speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, Musk outlined a monster rocket and huge spacecraft capable of transporting at least 100 people to Mars – a planet Musk appears to have ambitions of terraforming.

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Falcon 9 explosion narrowed to helium system failure

Falcon 9 explosion narrowed to helium system failure | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Faster than the blink of an eye – that’s how little time there was between the first sign of an anomaly and the loss of the Falcon 9 rocket with the AMOS-6 satellite during a pre-flight test propellant loading operation on Sept. 1, 2016. After poring over the data, SpaceX engineers have narrowed down the likely cause of the explosion to a failure in the upper stage’s helium system.

Largely silent in the days following the incident, SpaceX has provided scant information on the progress of the investigation – until now. In a release issued by the company Sept. 23, 2016, SpaceX outlined some of the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (AIT) – composed of SpaceX, the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and industry experts – and on the condition of the infrastructure at Launch Complex 40 (LC-40).

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Falcon 9 rocket explosion traced to upper stage helium system | Spaceflight Now

Falcon 9 rocket explosion traced to upper stage helium system | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The investigation into a dramatic Falcon 9 rocket explosion earlier this month at Cape Canaveral has determined a “large breach” in the launcher’s upper stage helium pressurization system led to the destruction of the booster and its $200 million satellite payload, SpaceX said Friday.

Officials said returning to flight “safely and reliably” with the Falcon 9 rocket, a critical vehicle for NASA’s commercial crew and cargo program for the International Space Station, is SpaceX’s top priority.

The inquiry, led by SpaceX with assistance from government and industry experts, is still looking into the cause of the breach, which may be only a symptom and not the root of the Sept. 1 mishap. The spectacular explosion occurred as the 23-story rocket was being fueled for a preflight engine firing at Cape Canaveral’s Complex 40 launch pad.

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SpaceX says probe into Falcon 9 launch pad blast points to helium system leak

SpaceX says probe into Falcon 9 launch pad blast points to helium system leak | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX says an investigation into the launch pad explosion that destroyed a Falcon 9 rocket and its satellite payload has turned up evidence of a “large breach” in the supercooled helium system for the oxygen tank on the rocket’s second stage.

Today’s update made clear that the root cause of the Sept. 1 blast at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida has not yet been identified. Nevertheless, SpaceX said it anticipated to return to flight as early as November, “pending the results of the investigation.”

SpaceX is leading the investigation, just as it did last year when a Falcon 9 broke apart shortly after liftoff. That mishap involved a component inside the second-stage oxygen tank, but today the company said it’s ruled out a connection between the two blasts.

“All plausible causes are being tracked in an extensive fault tree and carefully investigated,” SpaceX said.

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Anomaly Updates

Anomaly Updates | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"At this stage of the investigation, preliminary review of the data and debris suggests that a large breach in the cryogenic helium system of the second stage liquid oxygen tank took place. All plausible causes are being tracked in an extensive fault tree and carefully investigated. Through the fault tree and data review process, we have exonerated any connection with last year’s CRS-7 mishap."

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Blue Origin's future rocket plans - 9.29

Blue Origin announced their New Glenn orbital rocket this last week. We take a peek at the history of Blue Origin, where they are now, what they have announced and the possible New Armstrong tease could mean.

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Launch failures: non-launch mishaps | The Space Review

Launch failures: non-launch mishaps | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The pad accident that destroyed a Falcon 9 rocket early this month during preparations for a static fire test was rare, but not unprecedented. Wayne Eleazer examines some of the previous pad mishaps in the history of the Space Age.

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Selecting from the flight demonstration spectrum | The Space Review

Selecting from the flight demonstration spectrum | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

An aerospace flight demonstrator can help prove technologies and business cases for full-scale vehicles, if they’re selected properly. Steve Hoeser describes the various types of flight demonstrators and how they should best be used to further a vehicle development effort.

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How we settle Mars is more important than when | The Space Review

How we settle Mars is more important than when | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Much of the discussion about human missions to Mars has focused on the technical challenges of such missions. Joelle Renstrom argues that the various ethical considerations of such missions should not be ignored.

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How SpaceX Will Make Interplanetary Civilization a Reality

On Tuesday, 27 September, Elon Musk announced SpaceX's Martian Colonization Architecture. This video is designed to get you hyped, and help explain to your friends and family why you might be so hyped.

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Elon Musk: A Million Humans Could Live on Mars By the 2060s

Elon Musk: A Million Humans Could Live on Mars By the 2060s | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

In perhaps the most eagerly anticipated aerospace announcement of the year, SpaceX founder Elon Musk has revealed his grand plan for establishing a human settlement on Mars.

In short, Musk thinks it’s possible to begin shuttling thousands of people between Earth and our smaller, redder neighbor sometime within the next decade or so. And not too long after that—perhaps 40 or a hundred years later, Mars could be home to a self-sustaining colony of a million people.

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SpaceX’s Elon Musk makes the big pitch for his decades-long plan to colonize Mars

SpaceX’s Elon Musk makes the big pitch for his decades-long plan to colonize Mars | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

GUADALAJARA, Mexico – SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has made some ambitious sales pitches in his career, but today’s big reveal about his plan to transport a million settlers to Mars over the next few decades has to be the topper.

The billionaire began his 95-minute talk with the existential concern over Earth’s long-term future, and the need to set up a civilization beyond Earth to safeguard the species. “I hope you’d agree this is the right way to go. Yes? … That’s what we want,” he said.

From there on, Musk laid out a step-by-step blueprint that culminated in a vision of a totally reusable super-spaceship that could transport 100 to 200 passengers and their luggage to the Red Planet.

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SpaceX performs first test of Raptor engine | SpaceNews.com

SpaceX performs first test of Raptor engine | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — On the eve of a major presentation outlining his Mars exploration plans, SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk announced early Sept. 26 the first test of a rocket engine believed to be a key element in those plans.

Musk, in a series of tweets, disclosed the test of the Raptor engine, which uses methane and liquid oxygen propellants rather than the refined kerosene and liquid oxygen of the company’s Merlin engines. Musk did not disclose details about the test, including when it took place and how long it fired.

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Rocket Crafters notes safety of hybrid rockets after SpaceX disaster

Rocket Crafters notes safety of hybrid rockets after SpaceX disaster | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceFlight Insider spoke with former NASA astronaut and current Rocket Crafters CEO and Chairman Sid Gutierrez about the potential of hybrid rockets in the wake of the Sept. 1, 2016, explosion that consumed a SpaceX Falcon 9, its Amos-6 satellite, and damaged the launch site at Cape Canaveral’s SLC-40.

 

According to Gutierrez, the propellants used couldn’t be safer. Nitrous oxide (N2O – more commonly known as laughing gas) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) – the same material that Lego bricks are made from. He noted that ABS is transportable on commercial aircraft, a far cry from cryogenic fuels.

 

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket is fueled by a mixture of RP-1 (highly refined rocket-grade kerosene) and liquid oxygen. The volatile nature of this mixture was made apparent with this month’s accident at SLC-40.

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Falcon accident investigation points to breach in rocket’s helium system | SpaceNews.com

Falcon accident investigation points to breach in rocket’s helium system | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — Investigators have traced the explosion that destroyed a SpaceX Falcon 9 on the pad Sept. 1 to a “large breach” in the helium system in the rocket’s second stage, although the root cause of the accident remains unknown.

In a Sept. 23 update, the first released by the company in nearly three weeks, SpaceX said that an accident investigation team continues to study evidence from the explosion that took place while the rocket was being fueled for a static-fire test.

“At this stage of the investigation, preliminary review of the data and debris suggests that a large breach in the cryogenic helium system of the second stage liquid oxygen tank took place,” the company said in a statement. What caused that breach, though, is still a mystery.

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SpaceX continuing to press toward Amos-6 failure root cause | NASASpaceFlight.com

SpaceX continuing to press toward Amos-6 failure root cause | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX is still working towards a root cause into the failure of its Falcon 9 during a Static Fire test. The failure, which resulted in the destruction of the rocket and the Amos-6 satellite, originated in the second stage LOX tank’s helium pressurization system, although the specific cause of the anomaly is not yet fully understood. SpaceX is still hopeful it will be able to return to launch action in November.

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NASA to have limited role in SpaceX’s planned Mars campaign | Spaceflight Now

NASA to have limited role in SpaceX’s planned Mars campaign | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Expertise, input and advice from seasoned NASA engineers will improve SpaceX’s chances of nailing the first commercial landing on Mars as soon as late 2018, a senior space agency official said Wednesday, but Elon Musk’s space transport company will likely seek more independence from U.S. government support on later expeditions to the red planet.

While considered high risk by NASA standards, the Red Dragon Mars mission revealed by SpaceX in April has a “reasonable likelihood” of success, according to Phil McAlister, NASA’s director of commercial spaceflight development.

McAlister said NASA will act as a consultant to SpaceX on the Red Dragon project, the first of a series of Mars landers planned by the Hawthorne, California-based company. NASA’s participation will diminish in later missions, he said.

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The new era of heavy lift | The Space Review

The new era of heavy lift | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Last week, Blue Origin unveiled its planned orbital launch vehicle, New Glenn, that likely will be able to place payloads weighing dozens of metric tons into low Earth orbit. Jeff Foust notes it’s the latest development in heavy-lift vehicles that include programs by NASA and SpaceX.

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Commercial crew: two years after contracts, two years until flights | The Space Review

Commercial crew: two years after contracts, two years until flights | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Last week marked the second anniversary of NASA’s award of commercial crew contracts to Boeing and SpaceX. Jeff Foust reports that, despite initial hopes that one or both vehicles would be ready by the end of 2017, delays until late 2018 are looking increasingly likely for both.

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A tale of two launchers | The Space Review

A tale of two launchers | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

As SpaceX continued to investigate a mysterious pad accident that destroyed a Falcon 9, United Launch Alliance flawlessly launched another NASA mission. Jeff Foust reports on those developments and their implications for both companies.

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