The NewSpace Daily
Follow
Find
110.1K views | +60 today
Scooped by Stratocumulus
onto The NewSpace Daily
Scoop.it!

On eve of its next mission, SpaceX offers new details on previous Falcon 9 launch | NewSpace Journal

On eve of its next mission, SpaceX offers new details on previous Falcon 9 launch | NewSpace Journal | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

During a preflight press conference Thursday afternoon, SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell provided some new details about the previous Falcon 9 launch, of the CRS-1 mission, in October. That launch suffered a shutdown of one of its nine first stage engines; the Dragon spacecraft still reached orbit although a second payload, a demonstration satellite for commercial communications company ORBCOMM, was placed in a lower-than-planned orbit to comply with NASA mission rules, and deorbited a few days later. Back in December Shotwell said the investigation into the engine anomaly was wrapping up, but offered few details about the incident.

 

On Thursday, Shotwell went into a little more detail. “There was a material flaw that went undetected in the jacket of the Merlin engine, resulting in a breach during the flight, causing depressurization of the combustion chamber,” she said. “The flight computer recognized that depressurization and commanded a shutdown.”

more...
No comment yet.
The NewSpace Daily
NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
Curated by Stratocumulus
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Orbcomm OG2 - Falcon 9 Satellite Launch | YouTube

Webcast of the successful SpaceX Falcon 9v1.1 launch of the ORBCOMM OG2 Mission 1 on Monday, June 14, 2014.



more...
Donald Schwartz's curator insight, July 17, 12:04 PM

Great into space video, not animation.

Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

The dog days of summer launch debates | The Space Review

The dog days of summer launch debates | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Two of the key issues surrounding access to space in the US this year have been reliance on the Russian-built RD-180 engine and a dispute between the Air Force and SpaceX. Jeff Foust reports that, despite a number of hearings and other events, there’s no clear resolution to either issue on the horizon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Review: No Requiem for the Space Age | The Space Review

Review: No Requiem for the Space Age | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Forty-five years after Apollo 11, people still contemplate why that historic mission didn’t open a new era of space exploration. Jeff Foust reviews a book that argues that Apollo, and human space exploration, were victims of a change in cultures in America at the time of the Moon landing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Today’s space race: Google Lunar X Prize

Today’s space race: Google Lunar X Prize | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Msnbc’s Craig Melvin dives into today’s space competition organized by the X Prize foundation and sponsored by Google. Joined by Astrobotic CEO John Thornton, the pair discusses a $30 million dollar prize awarded to the team that lands a robot safely on the moon, moves 500 meters on, above, or below the Moon’s surface and sends back HDTV Mooncasts for everyone to enjoy.


more...
Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 20, 11:40 PM

The commercialization of the moon is definitely on its way.  One of these days, someone will put a repeater on the moon....talk about a huge satellite.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NASA’s new rocket drives ambition, fuels doubt

NASA’s new rocket drives ambition, fuels doubt | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


Houston Chronicle Science Writer Eric Berger takes an inside look at NASA new super booster, the SLS, which may be too expensive to actually fly.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Bezos Investment in Blue Origin Exceeds $500 Million | SpaceNews.com

Bezos Investment in Blue Origin Exceeds $500 Million | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos has invested at least half a billion dollars of his own money into Blue Origin, his spaceflight venture, a company official said July 17.


“We’re very fortunate to have a founder who has a vision and the funding and resources to match it,” Brett Alexander, director of business development and strategy at Blue Origin, said during a panel session of the Future Space 2014 conference in Washington. Bezos, best known as the founder and chief executive of Amazon.com, established Blue Origin in 2000.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NASA Considers Mars Mission With Help Of Tesla’s Elon Musk, While Celebrating 45 Years Since Apollo 11 Moon Landing | CBS San Francisco

NASA Considers Mars Mission With Help Of Tesla’s Elon Musk, While Celebrating 45 Years Since Apollo 11 Moon Landing | CBS San Francisco | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


45 years ago, America landed a man on the moon, and years from now, NASA and Tesla founder Elon Musk hope to have already landed a man on Mars, using Musk's SpaceX rocket in a public-private partnership that turns the Apollo program model on its head.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

New report tamps down “hype” about 3-D printing in space | NewSpace Journal

New report tamps down “hype” about 3-D printing in space | NewSpace Journal | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

As NASA prepares to launch the first 3-D printer for the International Space Station (ISS), a report released today says that while the technology may have considerable long-term benefits, its short-term potential has been exaggerated.


The National Research Council report, “3D Printing in Space,” examined the current state of 3-D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, and its potential applications in space. The report, sponsored by NASA and the US Air Force, concluded that the technology has benefits, but not necessarily in the immediate future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Virgin Galactic Sets Sights on 2016 for LauncherOne | Via Satellite

Virgin Galactic Sets Sights on 2016 for LauncherOne | Via Satellite | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Though more prominently known for its suborbital spaceflight business, Virgin Galactic has also been working on a dedicated small satellite launch system known as LauncherOne. Speaking to Via Satellite, George Whitesides, CEO of Virgin Galactic, said the company hopes to have liftoff using its air-launch system within the next two years.


more...
Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 18, 12:10 AM

Virgin Galactic is one of several commercial launch companies that is vying for Air Force and federal government launch contracts.  Perhaps AMSAT can work with Virgin Galactic's "Launcher One" satellite program to cut costs of orbiting amateur radio satellites. Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

House members press NASA for information on “epidemic of anomalies” with SpaceX missions | Space Politics

Three members of Congress from Alabama and Colorado have asked NASA to provide information on what they receive to be an “epidemic of anomalies” on missions performed by SpaceX.


“Recent news reports have shown that an epidemic of anomalies have occurred during SpaceX launches or launch attempts,” write Reps. Mo Brooks (R-AL), Mike Coffman (R-CO), and Cory Gardner (R-CO) in a July 15 letter to NASA administrator Charles Bolden. Those anomalies cited in the letter include issues with both SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft, ranging from “multiple” helium leaks to seawater intrusions into the Dragon spacecraft after splashdown.

Stratocumulus's insight:


To put it swiftly and bluntly, ULA, and all their "paid representatives," strike again.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

UrtheCast & NanoRacks To Install Additional Cameras On ISS

VANCOUVER, JULY 16, 2014 | UrtheCast Corp. (TSX:UR) (“UrtheCast” or “the Company”) is very pleased to announce that pursuant to its agreement with NanoRacks, LLC it plans to dramatically expand its Earth Observation data stream by operating state-of-the-art sensors on the NASA segment of the International Space Station (ISS).


The installation of the sensors further enhances UrtheCast’s market leadership for Space Station-based Earth Observation (EO). The Company intends to develop and supply the EO sensors, electronics and all related hardware. NanoRacks, working with the U.S. National Lab manager CASIS, will facilitate the launch, installation and onboard integration of the cameras and hardware in accordance with its Space Act Agreement with NASA.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Senate Could Hand SpaceX A Monopoly In Military Satellite Launches

Senate Could Hand SpaceX A Monopoly In Military Satellite Launches | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

If you have been following the controversy surrounding SpaceX’s efforts to break into the military launch market, then you know what founder Elon Musk’s big complaint is: lack of competition.  Up until last week, only one provider of launch services was certified by the Air Force to loft military satellites into orbit.  That provider, a joint venture of Boeing BA -0.3% and Lockheed Martin LMT +0.3% called United Launch Alliance (ULA), has enjoyed a de facto monopoly since its founding in 2006.  Musk says this arrangement invites abuse, and is trying to overturn a 2012 sole-source award of 36 rocket cores to ULA.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

ORB-2 Cygnus completes ISS rendezvous and berthing | NASASpaceFlight.com

ORB-2 Cygnus completes ISS rendezvous and berthing | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Orbital’s ORB-2 Cygnus spacecraft has successfully rendezvoused and berthed with the International Space Station (ISS) on Wednesday morning. The American spacecraft, partly built in Italy, guided in by Canadian sensors and grabbed by an American astronaut using another Canadian asset – Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) – completed her arrival at 6:36 Eastern.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

#Apollo45 - TMRO 7.21 | YouTube

Our main topic today is Apollo 45 years later and why we don't want a repeat of the past. Our next humans on the Moon or Mars should be there to stay, not just flags and footprints!

In Space News we have:


Orbital Sciences Antares Cygnes Launch, SpaceX Falcon 9 Orbcomm launch, Russia launches a Foton satellite via Soyuz, ESA Rosetta Update, UAE going to Mars in 2021, ISRO going to Mars again, UKs first Space Port and a Bonsai tree in space?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

New Fort Knox: A means to a solar-system-wide economy | The Space Review

New Fort Knox: A means to a solar-system-wide economy | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

While space advocates are never short of bold visions for future space development projects, funding them has long been a major challenge. Richard Godwin offers one approach to bootstrap long-term use of space resources though smaller initial steps and a key financial measure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

45 years after Tranquility: One small step to a bright future | NASASpaceFlight.com

45 years after Tranquility: One small step to a bright future | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Forty-five years ago tonight, people across the world held their breaths as a hair-raising, heart-pounded descent occurred a quarter of a million miles away from Earth. At the Sea of Tranquility, on 20 July 1969, two humans succeeded in what many had considered impossible: landing and walking on the surface of another world.



more...
Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 20, 11:37 PM

I remember that night 45-years ago. I was stationed at Mather Air Force Base near Sacramento, California and watched this over a television set in my squadron's briefing room.  I wished I could have been there, but as a "desk commando" (admin type), I was in no way qualified to be part of that historic mission.  I was so glad when the landing and departure were a success.  We were back in the space game again!  Those were the days.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

While NASA fixates on Mars, space rivals shoot for the moon

While NASA fixates on Mars, space rivals shoot for the moon | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

“I just have to say pretty bluntly here, we’ve been there before,” the President said, raising his right hand for emphasis. “Buzz has been there before.”


With this single line from his 2010 speech Obama reinforced the modern zeitgeist of the moon as a dead end on humanity’s path to the stars.


Yet much of the spaceflight community, many planetary scientists and all other space-faring nations do not share that view. The President, they say, had it all wrong. The moon, rather, offers an essential base camp for human exploration deeper into the solar system. From an outpost there explorers could fuel rockets, take on supplies and venture deeper into the solar system.


more...
Scott Baker's curator insight, July 20, 9:36 AM

Obama would be more believable if we still had the capability of reaching the Moon, but were just choosing to go to Mars.  Unfortunately, we can do neither, and can't even send people into orbit presently.  Pathetic excuse and rationalization, that's all this is, and everyone sees through it.

Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Will Pomerantz: How the Second Space Age Promises to Open up a New World of Exciting Opportunities | YouTube


Will Pomerantz, Virgin Galactic's VP of Special Projects, explains how the second space age promises to open up a new world of exciting opportunities.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Opinion: Spaceport support? | The Engineer

Opinion: Spaceport support? | The Engineer | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

This week’s announcement of eight shortlisted sites for a potential UK spaceport caused much excitement. And it’s easy to see why.


The image of Britain as a hub for reusable spaceplanes embarking on science, travel and tourism missions is certainly an exciting one from an economic, scientific and plain patriotic point of view.


But there was also some confusion over whether it was actually feasible to launch vehicles into space from the UK. And while the government was enthusiastically championing the idea, the companies actually developing spaceplanes didn’t appear to show the same level of support. So is a UK spaceport likely or even possible?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Column: Apollo program a flameout at 45 | USA Today

Column: Apollo program a flameout at 45 | USA Today | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Forty-five years ago this coming Sunday, in a stunning, unimaginable historical achievement, men from earth first walked on its moon. But for over four decades now, no one has gone further than a couple hundred miles or so, a thousand times less distant, from our home planet.


Why did we spend so much to go to another world, and then almost completely abandon the effort?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Getting to love logistics on the space station | The Space Review

Getting to love logistics on the space station | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

On Sunday, an Antares rocket launched a Cygnus spacecraft on a mission to deliver cargo, from food to smallsats, to the ISS. Jeff Foust reports on the launch and the challenges NASA and its industry partners are overcoming to establish a regular supply chain to the station.

more...
Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 18, 12:07 AM

it's about time we used our own launch platforms, rather than the rockets and facilities of other nations.  Perhaps we can be competitive again in the exploration of space.  Besides, the country needs the jobs and expertise to keep our space communications alive.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Space planes, rocket launches on UK's wish list | Spaceflight Now

Space planes, rocket launches on UK's wish list | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

FARNBOROUGH, England -- The British government has announced plans to develop a spaceport, revealing candidate sites across the United Kingdom and fostering closer ties with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to revamp regulations and lure space tourism, and potentially small satellite launches, to Britain.

 
The announcement Tuesday is the latest move by the government to expand Britain's space industry, which grew by 7.2 percent over the last two years, according to David Parker, head of the UK Space Agency.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

The New Space Race, and Why Nothing Else Matters

The New Space Race, and Why Nothing Else Matters | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Forty-five years ago this July 20th, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first human beings to set foot on the moon.  Their mission represented an emphatic American victory in the first space race, which began in earnest in 1957 when the Soviet Union launched a notably unattractive satellite, Sputnik, into orbit.

Since then, however, America’s national space program has essentially foundered.  It improved space travel by building and then scrapping the Space Shuttle, without ever accomplishing – or attempting – a mission as bold or impactful as the one in 1969.  It’s time for a new one.  To win the next space race, the US should announce its support for private property rights in space, and NASA should take a back seat.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

DARPA announces XS-1 study contracts | NewSpace Journal

DARPA announces XS-1 study contracts | NewSpace Journal | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced Tuesday it has awarded study contracts to three teams, representing a mix of established and entrepreneurial space companies, to study concepts for a reusable suborbital spaceplane.


DARPA said it awarded contracts to three teams: Boeing, working with Blue Origin; Masten Space Systems, working with XCOR Aerospace; and Northrop Grumman, working with Virgin Galactic. The contracts, for phase one of the Experimental Spaceplane 1 (XS-1) program, cover initial design work on concepts for the vehicle, designed to serve as a reusable lower stage of a low-cost launch system for medium-sized satellites.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Expedition 40 Welcomes ‘Seventh Crew Member’ as Spaceship Janice Voss Arrives at Space Station

Expedition 40 Welcomes ‘Seventh Crew Member’ as Spaceship Janice Voss Arrives at Space Station | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Less than three days since it launched its mighty Antares booster from Pad 0A at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) on Wallops Island, Va., Orbital Sciences Corp. has triumphantly brought its second “dedicated” Cygnus cargo ship—and its third overall, counting last September’s ORB-D “Demonstration” mission—to a smooth berthing at the International Space Station (ISS). Flying 260 miles (420 km) above northern Libya, Cygnus was grappled by the station’s 57.7-foot-long (17.6-meter) Canadarm2 robotic arm at 6:36 a.m. EDT Wednesday, 16 July. Fittingly for a spacecraft whose name is the Latin for “swan,” Wednesday's capture was led by Expedition 40 Commander Steve Swanson. A little more than two hours later, at 8:53 a.m., the cargo craft was firmly berthed at the “nadir” (or Earth-facing) port of the Harmony node, preparatory to hatch opening and crew ingress.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Three Teams To Develop Spaceplane Concepts for DARPA | SpaceNews.com

Three Teams To Develop Spaceplane Concepts for DARPA | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has awarded contracts to three companies to develop concepts for an experimental spaceplane capable of flying 10 times in 10 days, according to a July 15 DARPA press release.


The companies selected to develop the XS-1 spaceplane concepts are: Boeing, working with Blue Origin; Masten Space Systems working with XCOR Aerospace; and Northrop Grumman with Virgin Galactic. 


DARPA’s press release did not announce the contract values, but the agency previously said the awards would be worth roughly $4 million apiece. However, the Federal Business Opportunities website separately posted the value of the Masten contract, which is worth nearly $3 million, and Boeing said the value of its deal was $4 million.

more...
No comment yet.