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Researcher: Commercial spaceflight could be $1.6 billion industry

Researcher: Commercial spaceflight could be $1.6 billion industry | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON--Commercial spaceflight is not only possible, it could become a $1.6 billion industry in the next decade, a researcher told Congress on Wednesday.Carissa Bryce Christensen of the Tauri Group said 925 reservations for suborbital trips already have been purchased. Some customers have paid the full $200,000 cost in advance, while others have put down a $20,000 deposit.

 

The Tauri Group and the Federal Aviation Administration released a joint study that found demand at these prices to be “genuine, sustained, and ... sufficient to support multiple providers.”

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SpaceX, NASA Managers Discuss Vehicle Mishap Following CRS-7 Launch | YouTube


During a post-launch press conference on June 28, mangers from SpaceX and NASA discuss the mishap following the liftoff of the SpaceX CRS-7 mission from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The mission was to deliver supplies, hardware and other important cargo to the International Space Station. SpaceX is leading the investigation of the cause of the issue.

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Another major rocket failure for a space industry out to prove itself

Another major rocket failure for a space industry out to prove itself | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


It was a beautiful day on the cape, sunny and hot with patchy clouds — good weather for rocketry. SpaceX’s unmanned Falcon 9 rocket looked great as it tore a hole in the sky, propelling 4,000 pounds of cargo in a Dragon capsule toward the International Space Station.

NASA’s Twitter account offered the play-by-play: “And we have liftoff of @SpaceX #ISScargo resupply mission to the @Space_Station.”

Two minutes later, Elon Musk’s Falcon 9 blew up like a bottle rocket. Food, supplies, hardware and dozens of student science experiments rained to the sea off the Florida coast.

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SpaceX's Falcon 9 Rocket Failure Adds to the Pressure on Space Station

SpaceX's Falcon 9 Rocket Failure Adds to the Pressure on Space Station | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX's billionaire founder, Elon Musk, says there'll be no quick answers to the questions surrounding Sunday's loss of his company's Falcon 9 rocket and its cargo for the International Space Station.

The cause of the mishap is "still unknown after several thousand engineering-hours of review," Musk tweeted overnight. "Now parsing data with a hex editor to recover final milliseconds."

He said that the problem was traced to excessive pressure in the upper stage's liquid oxygen tank — but that the cause of that condition appeared to be "counterintuitive." His comments led to deep discussions on such forums as Reddit and NASASpaceflight.com.

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Photos: Falcon 9 blasts off, then breaks apart in mid-air | Spaceflight Now

Photos: Falcon 9 blasts off, then breaks apart in mid-air | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


Cameras positioned around SpaceX’s launch facility at Cape Canaveral captured stunning photos of the Falcon 9 rocket’s picturesque blastoff into a sun-splashed sky Sunday morning, but the photogenic launch went awry minutes later.

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The aftermath of a launch failure | The Space Review

The aftermath of a launch failure | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

On Sunday, SpaceX suffered the first failure of its Falcon 9 rocket in 19 launches, losing a Dragon cargo spacecraft bound for the ISS. Jeff Foust reports on what’s known about the failure and its implications for the company, the space station, and broader space policy.

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SpaceX failure adds another kink in station supply chain | Spaceflight Now

SpaceX failure adds another kink in station supply chain | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


Managers in charge of International Space Station say the massive orbiting laboratory and its residents can keep going despite Sunday’s failure of a SpaceX resupply launch, which destroyed a new docking adapter critical to NASA’s commercial crew program, a spacesuit, and a part to repair the lab’s water purification system.

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket disintegrated minutes after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, marking the commercial launcher’s first failure in 19 missions and destroying more than 4,000 pounds of gear needed on the space station.

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SpaceX Failure Leaves Long List of Customers in the Lurch | SpaceNews.com

SpaceX Failure Leaves Long List of Customers in the Lurch | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


PARIS — The June 28 failure of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is almost certain to deal a blow to the revenue projections of numerous SpaceX commercial customers that had been basing their results on being in orbit this year or early in 2016.

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Space KSC: The Fall

Space KSC: The Fall | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


"Today I met a 12-year old from a Colorado middle school who had an experiment aboard SpaceX CRS-7. I told her I was sorry she lost her experiment, but she was undeterred. Grinning from ear to ear, she said, 'We'll build another one and do it again!'

"That is what SpaceX will do. Build another one. And do it again."

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Statement: Space Frontier Foundation Expresses Condolences on Falcon 9 Loss, High Hopes for Spaceflight


“Today, our thoughts go out to the hard working team at SpaceX. It’s important to see this event as yet another learning experience for the commercial space industry that will only increase the probability of SpaceX’s success with the Falcon 9 in the future,” said Jeff Feige, Chairman of the Board of the Space Frontier Foundation. “Space is hard, incredibly hard, just as aviation and ocean voyages were in their infancies, but with the unwavering determination of companies like SpaceX and the NewSpace community, I have no doubt we will overcome the inevitable setbacks only to return stronger and even more determined.”

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Ranking Members Johnson and Edwards Statements on SpaceX CRS-7 Launch Vehicle Failure

Ranking Members Johnson and Edwards Statements on SpaceX CRS-7 Launch Vehicle Failure | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

“The loss of today’s SpaceX cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station is a reminder that spaceflight is still not a routine undertaking. While the loss of the mission is disappointing, I am grateful that no one was hurt. I am confident that SpaceX and NASA will determine the cause of today’s failure and take the necessary corrective actions. In the meantime, NASA has assured us that the crew on the International Space Station is in no danger as a result of today’s accident.”

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Pressurization Event in Second Stage Likely Cause of SpaceX CRS-7 Failure

SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell said during a press conference this afternoon that early data indicate that the cause of the Falcon 9 launch failure today was due to pressurization issues in the second stage.  Some confusion remains as to whether the rocket exploded on its own or because of a destruct signal sent by the Range Safety Officer, but Shotwell said she did not believe it was due to a destruct signal

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket exploded 139 seconds (2:19 minutes) into flight this morning (Sunday, June 28) following a 10:21 am ET launch.   NASA posted a video of the launch and failure on YouTube.  Shotwell said data showed "some pressurization indications in the second stage" that the company will be "tracking down and following up on."  She could not provide any other details at this early stage of the investigation other than saying they do not suspect the first stage.

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Falcon 9 rocket destroyed in launch mishap | Spaceflight Now

Falcon 9 rocket destroyed in launch mishap | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying a Dragon cargo ship loaded with more than 4,000 pounds of supplies and equipment bound for the International Space Station — including a critical docking adapter needed by future U.S. crew ships — broke apart in a shower of debris shortly after launch Sunday in a major setback for NASA and the California rocket company.

In a spectacular mishap, the rocket, the 19th Falcon 9 launched by SpaceX since 2010, disintegrated in a sudden cloud of swirling vapor followed moments later by arcing contrails as debris fell toward the Atlantic Ocean.

The last data from the spacecraft was received just under two-and-a-half minutes into flight, around the time the booster’s nine first stage engines were to have shut down. SpaceX founder Elon Musk, who turned 44 Sunday, said in a tweet that telemetry indicated a sudden change in the pressure of the second stage liquid oxygen tank just before the rocket came apart.

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Falcon 9 failure seen from the Press Site | YouTube


A Falcon 9 rocket on a space station resupply mission explodes minutes after launch from Cape Canaveral. This view is from Spaceflight Now's camera at the Kennedy Space Center Complex 39 Press Site.

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Understanding The Aftermath Of SpaceX’s Failed Falcon Launch

Understanding The Aftermath Of SpaceX’s Failed Falcon Launch | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


On Sunday morning, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket broke apart nearly 30 miles above Cape Canaveral just a few minutes after launch, marking its first full mission failure. The rocket was taking the Dragon capsule, carrying more than 4,000 pounds of supplies, to the International Space Station (ISS).

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SpaceX Commercial Crew Will Have Launch Escape Route | DNews

SpaceX Commercial Crew Will Have Launch Escape Route | DNews | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


In the video of the fireball that engulfed SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket Sunday, a little capsule, still intact, can be seen falling through the sky, a poignant reminder that rocket explosions can be survivable.

That’s an important and painful lesson NASA learned following the loss of two space shuttles and 14 astronauts, one that it is incorporating into the next generation of human spaceship currently under development.

The Dragon capsule that flew aboard the ill-fated Falcon rocket Sunday is nearly the same as one SpaceX is designing to fly people. Crew Dragon, however, will have an escape system that will enable the capsule to fly away from an exploding rocket and parachute to safety.

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Satellite owners among bystanders in Falcon 9 accident | Spaceflight Now

Satellite owners among bystanders in Falcon 9 accident | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


The long queue of satellites waiting on launches aboard SpaceX’s Falcon rockets — a backlog the company says is worth $7 billion — will stay grounded while investigators determine what caused a Falcon 9 booster to disintegrate after liftoff Sunday with supplies heading for the International Space Station.

Commercial and government satellite operators — from telecom giant SES to NOAA’s climate research team — were lined up to fly on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket in the coming months, and they will have to wait longer than bargained for when they signed on to launch on the commercial booster.

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Senate Bill Provides Partial Funding Increase For FAA Commercial Space Office | SpaceNews.com

Senate Bill Provides Partial Funding Increase For FAA Commercial Space Office | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


WASHINGTON — A Senate appropriations bill approved last week provides a modest increase in funding for the federal office that licenses commercial launches, but industry officials argue that the office requires more funding, particularly after the recent SpaceX launch failure.

The Senate Appropriations Committee approved a transportation and housing and urban development bill June 25 on a 20–10 vote. The bill, which funds the Federal Aviation Administration among other agencies, includes $17.425 million for the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation, the office that regulates commercial launch activities in the United States.

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Untangling the knot: fix Congress, pioneer space | The Space Review

Untangling the knot: fix Congress, pioneer space | The Space Review | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Opening up the frontier of space is a bold and exciting prospect. Yet, without denigrating America’s outstanding civil space program, the “system” is hardly tapping our nation’s collective potential. We all know that we can be achieving much more in space and doing so on faster timescales. Political impediments, including the new entrant of mounting polarization, continue to hamper potential progress. Decent people are operating within a flawed system. What could America accomplish in space if it aligned its program closer to national popular interest, while subjugating partisan and narrowly defined interests, including geography and campaign contributions?

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Range Safety Destruct Signal Was Sent To Falcon 9, But Too Late


SpaceX officials confirmed today that although a range safety destruct signal was sent to the Falcon 9 rocket yesterday, it was 70 seconds too late. The "mishap" had already occurred and the signal played no role in the loss of the vehicle.

Until this statement from SpaceX, it was not clear if the rocket malfunctioned, veered off course, and was destroyed by the Range Safety Officer, or if the rocket exploded on its own. Rockets are equipped with Flight Termination Systems that can be activated by sending an abort signal in order to protect public safety.

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Government Agencies Differ on Use, Usefulness of Cubesats | SpaceNews.com

Government Agencies Differ on Use, Usefulness of Cubesats | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — As interest in the use of cubesats continues to grow, U.S. government agencies are taking very different approaches regarding their use, with some openly embracing them as useful scientific tools and others more skeptical about their effectiveness.

One of the biggest advocates for cubesats has not been NASA but the National Science Foundation (NSF), which has funded a small program for space science cubesat missions since 2008. “Cubesats can help us provide some of these measurements that we badly need,” said Therese Moretto Jorgensen, who manages NSF’s cubesat program. “Cubesats can’t do everything, but they can help.”

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House Plans ISS Hearing for July 10 Amid Reactions to SpaceX Launch Failure

In a statement on the SpaceX launch failure today, the House Science, Space and Technology (SS&T) Committee announced that it will hold a hearing on the status of the International Space Station (ISS) on July 10.   The statement, from the chairs of the full committee and its space subcommittee, was one of several expressing disappointment about the failure but determination to learn what went wrong and continue to support the ISS.

The failure of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket 139 seconds after launch this morning (Sunday, June 28) marked the third failure in eight months of the systems that resupply the ISS with food, water, science experiments, spare parts and other equipment needed to sustain the station and its crew.  Usually six people inhabit the ISS although only three are there now because they are in the middle of a crew rotation. It was SpaceX's seventh operational cargo mission to the ISS under its Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) contract with NASA -- CRS-7 or SpX-7.  The first six were successful.

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Statement from Space Florida President Frank DiBello Regarding SpaceX CRS-7 Launch

Statement from Space Florida President Frank DiBello Regarding SpaceX CRS-7 Launch | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


"I was saddened to learn of the failure of the Falcon 9 after launch this morning. But this is the space business, where complex vehicles fly in unforgiving environments. From time to time mishaps will happen. In its short history SpaceX has built an impressive record of success and I have no doubt that the company will get to the bottom of the problem, fix it and continue on successfully."

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Docking Adapter, Satellites, Student Experiments Lost In Dragon Failure | SpaceNews.com

Docking Adapter, Satellites, Student Experiments Lost In Dragon Failure | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it


WASHINGTON — The cargo lost on a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft when its Falcon 9 launch vehicle failed June 28 range from a key piece of hardware for future commercial crew spacecraft to an experiment developed by middle school students, but NASA officials said none of the cargo was critical to the near-term operations of the International Space Station.

The Dragon, flying on the seventh mission under SpaceX’s Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA, carried 1,867 kilograms of pressurized cargo intended for the ISS, a total that increases to 1,952 kilograms when the weight of the cargo’s packaging is included. That total included 676 kilograms of crew supplies, 461 kilograms of hardware for the ISS, and 529 kilograms of scientific investigations.


The largest, and perhaps most valuable, item lost on the Dragon was an International Docking Adapter (IDA), a 526-kilogram item transported as unpressurized cargo in the “trunk” section of the Dragon spacecraft. The IDA, one of two built by NASA, would have been attached to the station to serve as a docking port for future commercial crew vehicles and potentially other spacecraft.

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Slow motion video of the Falcon 9 explosion | YouTube


A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket breaks up in mid-flight after its 2nd stage liquid oxygen tank experienced "an over pressure event". This is high definition video slowed to a tenth of the normal speed.

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