New pharma
Follow
Find
7.2K views | +16 today
 
Rescooped by rob halkes from Pharma
onto New pharma
Scoop.it!

Predicting success for new drugs using Social Media analysis

Predicting success for new drugs using Social Media analysis | New pharma | Scoop.it

Treato's Gideon Mantel writes:

 

Social media can predict the success of a new drug launch much faster than traditional methods. Many pharmaceutical companies try to measure the success of their launch based on weekly script trends. The difference between social media data and data derived from prescriptions is significant: social media data can predict the future, while script data record the past.

 

Social media can also, to some degree, explain events and not just record them, since patient posts are much more nuanced than purchase data, often sharing the why and not just the what.

 

Using older methods, it can take years to understand the result and impact of a new drug launch. Today social media can provide early vital signals in real time.

 

To illustrate this, let’s look at Tecfidera (formerly called BG-12 during clinical trials), a new multiple sclerosis drug that Biogen launched on April 13 [through an examination of the patient voice from billions of patient-written social media posts on over 2,000 health blogs and forums].

 

Interestingly, since the launch of Tecfidera in mid-April, the most talked about MS drug in social media has been Tecfidera, bypassing all other MS medications and growing on a daily basis. We also see significant differences between Tecfidera discussions and that of other MS medications in that 36% of the Tecfidera discussions are on Facebook while for other MS medications only 28% of the discussions are taking place on Facebook (our analysis does not include Twitter).


Via Andrew Spong
more...
Art Jones's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:45 AM

Monitoring social media conversations can predict the success of a new drug or not, more accurately than in the past.

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, June 1, 2013 7:44 AM

Interesting.

New pharma
Pharma's struggle for a new commercial model
Curated by rob halkes
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Pharma’s customer centric new commercial approach

Pharma’s customer centric new commercial approach | New pharma | Scoop.it

John Mack, better known as @Pharmaguy from Pharma Marketing news asked me to have an interview with me about this new commercial model for pharma, working customer centric.

We don’t have a transcript of the interview, but do like to present our preparing notes for the interview, which might enlighten some of the key points of the new customer centric pharma market approach:

Starting Point:
Pharma’s standard approach to all markets cannot go on as we do;
In general: we all know the genera threads to pharma markets, like loss of “blockbuster products”, limited access for promotion to Rx, pricing pressure, inroad of generics, new stakeholders, etc.
These are specific to all markets – And what’s more market conditions like access, regulations, promotional rules, preferences, prescription routines, etc. do make all markets differ substantially from each other, even within countries we have regions with their own health policy: e.g. Spain, France, Italy, or even onto local committees like in the UK and the Netherlands.

Need to look at new commercial models adapting to the different market conditions! How to localize/differentiate the market approach?

Read here for:

- The starting point ..

- Strategic Positioning

- Building partnerships, and

- the market approach ...

rob halkes's insight:

In a nutshell, I blogged the essential aspects of the new customer centric market approach for pharma in 2013. It is still significant today, even more when we want to  help our customers to help their patients better.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rob halkes from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
Scoop.it!

How the Pharma industry uses Social Media [Infographic]

How the Pharma industry uses Social Media [Infographic] | New pharma | Scoop.it
Research shows Pharma has been slow on the uptake, but massive opportunities await New communications technology has the potential to both disrupt and enha. Marketing topic(s):Social media marketing. Advice by Robert Allen.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
rob halkes's insight:

Nice Infographic about the actual use of social media by pharma (click through to original post)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Patient involvement could improve medicines R&D, according to industry

Patient involvement could improve medicines R&D, according to industry | New pharma | Scoop.it
A new study by EUPATI has revealed a belief among pharmaceutical industry personnel that greater involvement of patients and the public could improve medicines research and development (R&D). The study, which is one of the first of its kind and part of the wider European Patients’ Academy (EUPATI) project, was published today in the BMJ Open.

Patients have become increasingly involved in managing their own health over recent years. Although still an emerging area, patient involvement in medicines R&D – in which patients are actively involved in research projects and in research organisations – is most visible in public research environments (e.g. the UK’s National Institute for Health Research) and areas where existing treatment options are limited (e.g. rare diseases).

Researchers interviewed 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals, representing 11 companies, from the UK, Spain and Poland, with diverse professional roles including pan-European roles, about their attitudes regarding Public and Patient Involvement (PPI) in medicines R&D.

Most of the professionals had positive beliefs about PPI, and many were optimistic that greater involvement of patients and the public would contribute positively to the medicines R&D process. However, those in Spain and Poland expressed more uncertainty about the benefits and value of PPI than those in the UK or with pan-European roles.

The interviewees also highlighted potential barriers to further PPI activity within the sector, including a sense that the concept was too intangible at the moment to persuade industry leaders of its importance and benefits; that organisational codes of practice currently represent obstacles to PPI; and that it may be difficult to engage public and patients if they have negative views of the sector.

As a result of the study, the EUPATI project is discussing the potential for a new direction towards PPI in industry-led medicines R&D and has identified examples of patient/industry partnerships in this area.

rob halkes's insight:

Patients like no other can give directions to unmet needs and wishes in medicine research. their experiences might even give new direction in new developments in drug research and design.

However as indicated elsewhere: collaborating with other stakeholders goes further than just seeing them as marketing targets.

See this blog by Andrew Spong. See here

In a different perspective, it must be said that the relationships between patient advocacy Groups and the pharma industry is not an easy one too. See PatientView

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

A Revolutionary Paradigm Shift in Big Pharma's Organisational Development by Cristina Falcão

"Ensuring a change for the better"
A Revolutionary Paradigm Shift in Big Pharma's Organisational Development by Cristina Falcão - A paradigm is the conceptual framework upon which we build our world; it is built upon past experiences; if we are not willing to make shifts in our paradigms, we will remain stagnate in our growth a paradigm shift is a change from one way of thinking to another; it is something that does not happen like self generation it is driven by change.

Culture change is not simply about how we see others and ourselves. It is about how the system works, i.e. how we do the work together, rather than how we work together. The paradigm shift is to understand how to act on the organisation as a system.

The most critical thing to understand about a paradigm is that, in a paradigm shift, everything goes back to zero. What does that mean? It means that whatever made us successful in the old paradigm may not even be necessary in the new paradigm....

What Has Changed? Everything – 2012 Portrays Big Pharma’s Future Scenario

Governments around the world are grappling to arrive at solutions for health account deficits. Political pressures have increased during the economic crisis.

Personalised medicine means changing drug portfolios from primary care driven blockbusters towards specialties, where the medical need is so high that regulators are more ready to accept the prices. Evidence of the value that medicines bring to healthcare systems will be required to achieve access and funding in both developed and emerging markets. 

However, changing portfolios to address the changing pharma landscape is not enough; the pipelines are dry and R&D costs continue to skyrocket - the new paradigm is not about portfolios. Broadly, to raise innovation returns back to the level that prevailed in the era of blockbusters, pharma companies need transformational change.


Read on here

rob halkes's insight:

Already in 2012, change was needed to pharma's business model.
Nowe we see the urge to incrfease by heavy debates on pricing of drugs and generall influences of pharma industry on prescription.

Tghe time has come to act. Not just by changes to the commercial approach, like multi channel management, or other add ons to the traditional promotion, but a rethink and design of the proper approach.
See my work on pharma here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

AstraZeneca digs into precision medicine with lung, heart deals

AstraZeneca digs into precision medicine with lung, heart deals | New pharma | Scoop.it

AstraZeneca is diving deeper into personalized healthcare with two projects that move the concept beyond cancer into respiratory disorders and heart disease.

Personalized or precision medicine, which tailors treatment to a patient's genetic profile, is an increasing focus for drug companies, especially after an initiative from U.S. President Barack Obama in January.

Until now, however, the focus has been on cancer, where genetic mutations are well-known drivers of disease.

"The time is now right to extend the personalized healthcare approach and the benefits it brings to all of our therapy areas," Ruth March, who heads the initiative at the British drugmaker, told reporters.

"Up to now the science of personalized healthcare has been slower to reach those common disease areas such as cardiovascular and respiratory disease."

To redress the balance, AstraZeneca said on Wednesday it had signed two deals, one with Abbott Laboratories for a diagnostic test to accompany an experimental asthma drug and another with Canadian scientists on genes associated with heart disease.

Abbott will develop a diagnostic test to identify patients with severe asthma who are most likely to benefit from AstraZeneca's new antibody drug tralokinumab, which is in final-stage Phase III clinical tests.

To date, there are no such approved blood tests for use in asthma.

A separate tie-up with the Montreal Heart Institute will screen samples from up to 80,000 patients for genetic traits linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in a program that may help doctors work out which patient should take which drug.

By 2020, AstraZeneca expects half of its new drug launches will come with so-called companion diagnostics to identify those patients most likely to benefit from different treatments.

This approach is already used in cancer, with Roche's breast cancer drug Herceptin and AstraZeneca's lung cancer medicine Iressa, for example, given to patients with particular genetic profiles. Cancer has long been a key area for AstraZeneca, which was the target of a $118 billion attempted takeover last year by Pfizer.

Along with rivals in the field, AstraZeneca will showcase its latest cancer drug advances at the May 29 to June 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago.

Industry analysts say most attention will be focused on the latest clinical data on AstraZeneca's combination of two experimental medicines, MEDI4736 and tremelimumab, in treating lung cancer.

rob halkes's insight:

As we have noitfied in researching the developments of Pharma into Value Added Services (see here ), pharma companies are working to see how they can develop services to thealth care that could help the development of integrated care. One aspect we have seen accentuated by the interviewees was the necessity to create partnership with other stakeholders to combine needed competencies. AstraZeneca shows this by their latest partnerships with Abbott Laboratories and the Montreal Heart Institute. Beleive me: health care won't be the same anymore - although there is still along way to go!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Why Pharma Matters

Why Pharma Matters | New pharma | Scoop.it
In 1948, the year I was born, the average American man did not retire at age 65. He died of a heart attack.There were no thrombolytic drugs to break up the clots that were starving his heart of oxygen, no beta-blockers to ease the strain on his heart. There were no cardiac surgeons. Coronary artery bypass grafts lay a dozen years in the future, and though cardiac catheterization had just been developed, it would be nearly three decades before it would be used to reopen blocked coronary arteries
rob halkes's insight:

Pharma matters, in the past, at present and certainly in the future..

But how to define thier new position in healthcare: is it less or more than 'just" making new drugs??

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Succesful mHealth Publishing-presentation-mHealth-Summit-Israel by Research2Guidance

rob halkes's insight:
Very insightful report about the mhealth market from a Pharma viewpoint says: publishing apps by pharma is not that easy, but has been done a lot. Learn from the information about their success!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

37 companies reviewed in "Corporate Reputation of Pharma in 2014 - The Patient Perspective"

37 companies reviewed in "Corporate Reputation of Pharma in 2014 - The Patient Perspective" | New pharma | Scoop.it

The 4th edition of PatientView's annual CORPORATE REPUTATION INDEX OF PHARMA has collected responses from over 1,100 patient groups worldwide, which comment on the state of pharma in 2014 and on the corporate reputation of 37 companies. The first report in the series, taking a global perspective, will be published in February 2015, with companies ranked for their reputation from the perspective of these patient groups. 

Over the past 3 years, the CORPORATE REPUTATION INDEX OF PHARMA has been featured by the Financial Times, by Forbes Magazine, and by numerous national and trade papers around the world. Most recently, the importance of PatientView's corporate reputation analyses was recognised in the Deloitte report, "Healthcare and Life Sciences Predictions 2020 - A Bold Future?", published in late 2014.  

As a pharma company, you may wish to obtain a preview copy (previews are only available before the report is sent to the press in early February 2015), see information here

rob halkes's insight:

Great must see inisghts into pharma's relations to patients by @PatientView

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Integrated Delivery Networks (IDN) - Evolution & Necessities | Mu Sigma Thought Leadership

Integrated Delivery Networks (IDN) - Evolution & Necessities | Mu Sigma Thought Leadership | New pharma | Scoop.it
Integrated Delivery Networks (IDN) has resulted in a consolidated network for healthcare providers. Check out how this influences the decision sciences methodology for pharmaceutical companies.


Why this is important

Health care providers are undergoing a series of integrations that result in a consolidated network providing affordable and quality medical care –The IDN. Pharmaceutical companies need to evaluate their sales and marketing efforts and shift their focus from physician based selling to network based selling in order to tap the centralized decision makers.

Conventional Wisdom

Over the past few years the pharmaceutical industry has viewed Physicians as one of the dominant entities influencing its success and growth. A physician reserved the autonomy on decisions concerning the choice of therapy for his patients and was subjected to influence mainly by peers (group-practices) and Industry leaders (KOLs). Consequently, all pharmaceutical companies focused their promotional and educational initiatives on physicians. Sales teams were determined to acquire the mind share of physicians which resulted in having to tap a large group of individuals in order to expect returns. However, this is becoming old school.

The Evolving Industry

In the recent past, Health Care providers (primarily hospital chains) have undergone a series of vertical and horizontal integrations. Vertical integrations included the acquisition of primary care physicians (PCPs), strategic alliances with physicians in physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) etc. On the other hand, horizontal integrations involved the establishment of multihospital systems, alliances with neighboring hospitals and mergers. Over time, such integrations have evolved and enhanced to what is today referred to as the Integrated Delivery Network (IDN).

The integrations have resulted in the creation of a network of facilities and providers working together to offer a continuum of care. Prevailing economic market conditions and an array of healthcare reforms demands high quality of treatment at reduced costs (PPACA -2014). The very nature of integration allows IDNs to gain perspective on quality and cost factors that lead to better outcomes. This new vision focuses not only on intervention, but also on prevention and wellness, guiding patients to the most appropriate site of care, at the right time and cost. In short, IDNs are “Patient Centric” systems that act as ‘Islands of Excellence’ providing quality cost-effective treatments.

Conventional Wisdom

Over the past few years the pharmaceutical industry has viewed Physicians as one of the dominant entities influencing its success and growth. A physician reserved the autonomy on decisions concerning the choice of therapy for his patients and was subjected to influence mainly by peers (group-practices) and Industry leaders (KOLs). Consequently, all pharmaceutical companies focused their promotional and educational initiatives on physicians. Sales teams were determined to acquire the mind share of physicians which resulted in having to tap a large group of individuals in order to expect returns. However, this is becoming old school.

The Evolving Industry

In the recent past, Health Care providers (primarily hospital chains) have undergone a series of vertical and horizontal integrations. Vertical integrations included the acquisition of primary care physicians (PCPs), strategic alliances with physicians in physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) etc. On the other hand, horizontal integrations involved the establishment of multihospital systems, alliances with neighboring hospitals and mergers. Over time, such integrations have evolved and enhanced to what is today referred to as the Integrated Delivery Network (IDN).

The integrations have resulted in the creation of a network of facilities and providers working together to offer a continuum of care. Prevailing economic market conditions and an array of healthcare reforms demands high quality of treatment at reduced costs (PPACA -2014). The very nature of integration allows IDNs to gain perspective on quality and cost factors that lead to better outcomes. This new vision focuses not only on intervention, but also on prevention and wellness, guiding patients to the most appropriate site of care, at the right time and cost. In short, IDNs are “Patient Centric” systems that act as ‘Islands of Excellence’ providing quality cost-effective treatments.

rob halkes's insight:

In short: The world of health care is changing rapidly under the stres of more quality and volume for less costs of care. The formation of Integrated Delivery Networks (IDNs) will rise. To the health industry and pharma it means: if ou're not in, you're out and your competitor is in. This makes the need to change principles of market approach from a pharmaceutical company even  higher.

Don't you have a clue as to how: get in touch:
www.healthbusinessconsult.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Sales rep restrictions point to need for a pharma rethink

Sales rep restrictions point to need for a pharma rethink | New pharma | Scoop.it

 .. A survey shows sales rep bans are accelerating, while also pointing to a limitedtime opportunity for pharma to become a significant partner for healthcare systems.

[..] the latest edition of his firm's survey his group compiled with Capgemini Consulting shows that change in certain aspects of the pharma commercial space is happening very, very, quickly— but he says the industry is not doing enough to adapt its promotional strategies to address a healthcare environment dominated by cost-conscious medical groups and performance-focused federal health programs.


But first, a little math. This years survey showed that 32% of physicians said they cannot talk to reps, compared to 27% last year. Apply this limit to doctors in organized health systems, and the restrictions become even greater: 42% of doctors affiliated with integrated health networks say they are not allowed to see reps—a 17% increase since last year.

Malloy told MM&M his group was surprised by how quickly the no-access population jumped since last year and said it probably reflects a higher pace of change than the industry is aware of. Further, he said the industry is wrongly using the same perspective it uses to woo doctors to court payers and integrated networks. He said that this is a pretty big problem because organizations don't need breakfast meetings, portals or newsletters. Instead, he said groups need technology and that pharma has an opportunity to “bring that expertise on how to use digital tech [like EMRs] effectively.”

The Quantia/Capgemini data indicate that getting the integrated-system approach right is only going to become more urgent: 2014 data suggest 57% of physicians now work within an organized provider system, like an Integrated Delivery Network/Health Network and 44% of doctors said they are working for organizations that are moving towards an Accountable Care Organization model, which generally means implementing even more restrictions around rep-doctor contacts and greater formulary control.

Malloy said this same data also outlines how pharma can become part of the health conversation by uniquely partnering with administrators and doctors[...]

The provider angle requires a rethink about what it means for a drug manufacturer to become a resource for health professionals.“Administrators don't have good relationships with their doctors... they have trouble communicating with the doctors they have acquired through acquisitions,” Malloy said, and noted that he sees an opportunity for pharma to position itself as a healthcare partner invested in the overall patient experience as opposed to a single condition. He that this change requires having reps address different levels of expertise—nurse practitioners, for example, instead of just doctors—and providing educational support that is not just pinned to a manufacturer's product.[..]

This concept hits on one the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics mentioned in a recent write-up about the importance of the patient journey, which IMS said is about more than Googling symptoms and potential physicians and includes the full experience—physician education, doctor-patient relationships and back-of-the-house considerations like formularies and the regimens physicians will be able to offer during exams.[...]

Malloy said being the go-to that puts all of these pieces together is a time-sensitive opportunity and unless pharma figures out “how to work with systems so they can directly and indirectly influence [the way] formulary management systems... are structured,” the impact will be harsh: “All the decision-making will be taken and pharma won't be able to influence it.”

rob halkes's insight:

It is clear: the rep function of pharma is getting outdated, unless... We knew that, did we?

Malloy suggest a new approach which is in essence about delivering services that clients might really need beyond just information on the drug.

But, based upon my own experience in updating the promotional approach of pharma companies, I'm not very enthusiastic about the suggestions made here. Think for instance on the need for internal alignment, in my view the most difficult issue for change to current pharma companies, ..

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rob halkes from New Wave Drug Discovery
Scoop.it!

Digital Transformation Moves Pharma 'Beyond the Pill' #hcsmeu #pharma

Digital Transformation Moves Pharma 'Beyond the Pill' #hcsmeu #pharma | New pharma | Scoop.it
Pharmas are looking to move to a range of value-added services under the moniker beyond-the-pill – and most of those new services are digital.

Via IHEALTHLABS EUROPE, John R. Amelia
rob halkes's insight:

A sure thing.. pharma's fundamental change is underway. The question is how to make it true within the organizations. I suspect a difficult change process is immanent, as I 'm currently well underway with such in pharma companies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Corporate reputation of the medical device industry - the patient perspective

Corporate reputation of the medical device industry - the patient perspective | New pharma | Scoop.it

THE CORPORATE REPUTATION OF THE MEDICAL DEVICE INDUSTRY —THE PATIENT PERSPECTIVE (3rd EDITION)

Report published by PatientView, June 4th 2014


London, June 4, 2014. This report is based on the findings of a PatientView March-April 2014 global survey exploring the views of 408 international, national, regional, and local patient groups from 54 countries (86% from Europe), and with a wide range of differing medical specialties. The report provides feedback on the corporate reputation of the medical device industry during 2013-2014, as well as the performance of 28 leading medical device companies for six key indicators that influence corporate reputation: patient-centredness; patient information; patient safety; useful products; transparency; and integrity. Results are compared with industry and corporate performance in the previous two years.

For the purposes of this report, the phrase ‘corporate reputation’ is defined as the extent to which medical device companies are meeting the expectations of patients and patient groups. 28 companies are examined in the report.


See the complete press release !!


Key Findings:

The 2014 survey is an exact repeat of studies carried out in2012 and 2013, allowing the progress of the medical device industry (and individual companies) to be tracked over the three-year period.

- 2013-2014 results put the medical device industry first among all healthcare industries (but by default). 60% of the patient groups responding to the 2013-2014 survey state that multinational medical device companies had an “Excellent” or “Good” reputation that year, the same percentage as in 2012-2013, and higher than in 2011-2012 (when only 53% stated as such). [..]
- In fact, the overall reputation of the medical device industry has slipped, in the perception of patients. When respondent patient groups were asked whether the corporate reputation of medical device companies in their own right had improved, declined, or remained unchanged over the past year (2013-2014), just 34% felt able to state that the industry’s reputation had improved (compared with 40% in 2012-2013). And 26% of the 2013-2014 respondents say that the reputation of the medical device industry declined (the figure was 24% in 2012-2013).[...]- The medical device industry’s performance at various activities of importance to patient groups is stable. On the whole, the performance of the medical device industry at activities of importance to patient groups has remained remarkably similar over the past two years (between 2013-2014 and 2012-2013). [...]

DENMARK’S COLOPLAST IS ONCE AGAIN OVERALL NUMBER 1


Ranking              2013-2014

Coloplast A/S   
ConvaTec

St.Jude Mecial
Novo Nordisk A/S
Roche Diagnostics

Sanofi

Abbott Labaratories

Fresenius Medical Care

Medtronic, Inc.

Philips Healthcare

rob halkes's insight:

Great Insights into the corporate reputations from the best performing Medical  Device Industry in patients' perspectives!

Kudos to Coloplast, ConvaTec and St.Jude Medical.

Sorry to see Philips healthcare just at the 10th place. 

Sweden seems to be the best country for Medical devices Industry..;-)

more...
rob halkes's curator insight, June 4, 2014 4:58 AM

Congrats to those in the top 10. What are you doing when you're organization is less than good in this perspective?

Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Pharma Marketing Blog: Healthcare Marketers Trend Report 2014: I Give It a "C-Meh!" Rating

Pharma Marketing Blog: Healthcare Marketers Trend Report 2014: I Give It a "C-Meh!" Rating | New pharma | Scoop.it

Not all available market research is created equal," says Rich Meyer, author of DTC Marketing Blog. According to Meyer, "some research is a must have and provides insights, but there is also a lot of available research that doesn’t clarify findings and is written by journalists not people will real world pharma business experience." He goes on to rate various sources of pharma marketing research (here).

Meyer has two ratings:"A-Must Have" and "D-Pass," which means don't bother with it. Meyer doesn't have a "C-Meh!" rating -- that's my way of saying "lackluster, take it or leave it."

One study "written by journalists" is the MM&M/Ogilvy CommonHealth Healthcare Marketers Trend Report, the 2014 version of which was just published (here). Let me tell you why I give it a "C-Meh!" rating.

One surprising finding of this survey of 202 "qualified" senior executives -- "all director level and above" -- employed by pharmaceutical, biotechnology, devices and diagnostics companies, is that 22% of pharma marketing budgets of these individuals goes to some form of digital marketing (websites, digital ads, SEO marketing, and social media).


See further read on blog!

rob halkes's insight:

Great review  by John Mack, @pharmaguy of these trend "researches". Due to his investment in time, we can state: trend reports? "C-meh" ;-)


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Almirall's Eduardo Sanchiz and Alfonso Ugarte with their view on patient centricity to pharma - eyeforpharma Barcelona 2016

Almirall's  Eduardo Sanchiz and Alfonso Ugarte with their view on patient centricity to pharma - eyeforpharma Barcelona 2016 | New pharma | Scoop.it

In these exclusive videos eyeforpharma's Paul SImms spoke with Eduardo Sanchiz and Alfonso Ugarte, resp CEO and Senior Director of Global Business Units of Almirall, on the changing pharma landscape, patient value and rewriting the business plan.

rob halkes's insight:

Inspiring to see the leadership of Almirall speaking about their personal drives to lead their company to patient centricity.

more...
PatientView's curator insight, February 8, 4:01 AM

@almirall  is featured in our new corporate rep report in March 2016  43 patient groups commenti on the company

Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

GSK, Astra, J&J link with universities in new drug research fund

GSK, Astra, J&J link with universities in new drug research fund | New pharma | Scoop.it
GlaxoSmithKline, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson have joined with three leading British universities to create a new 40 million pounds ($57 million) fund backing early drug research.
rob halkes's insight:

New pharma cannot do without collaboration and co-creation - not only though in research. The connection with stakeholders to create sustainable care is waiting to be developed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Corporate Reputation of Pharma-the perspective of 550 European Patient Groups - 34 companies reviewed

Corporate Reputation of Pharma-the perspective of 550 European Patient Groups - 34 companies reviewed | New pharma | Scoop.it

Published 28th September 2015: Corporate Reputation of Pharma-the perspective of 550 European Patient Groups - 34 companies reviewed

For further information about PatientView’s ‘Corporate Reputation of Pharma’ series of reports, access to a PDF version of this press statement, and report pricing, go to http://www.patient-view.com/bull-corp-reputation.html

European patient groups fear pharma’s pricing tactics are causing health inequities!

The 34 pharma companies reviewed for their corporate reputation in Europe are: AbbVie l Actavis l Allergan l Amgen l Astellas l AstraZeneca l Baxter International l Bayer l Biogen Idec l Boehringer Ingelheim l Bristol-Myers Squibb l Celgene l Eli Lilly (Lilly) l Gilead Sciences l GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) l Grũnenthal l Janssen l Lundbeck l Menarini l Merck & Co (the US company) l Merck Group (the German company) l Mylan l Novartis l Novo Nordisk l Pfizer l Roche l Sanofi l Servier l Shire l Stada Arzneimittel l Takeda l Teva l UCB l ViiV

Findings based on the opinions of 550 Europe-based patient groups responding to the 2014 edition of PatientView’s annual study: ‘The Corporate Reputation of Pharma—from a Patient Perspective’.
Survey conducted November 2014 to January 2015.
This independent study, funded by PatientView, represents (for the second time) the perspectives of patient groups based across Europe (550 in 2014) on the corporate reputation of 34 individual pharma companies, and of the European pharma industry as a whole, during 2014. The opinions of 2014’s respondent Europe-based patient groups are compared in the report with those from the 2013 European patient-group survey.


Key findings:
Europe-based patient groups regard pharma more positively in 2014 than they did in 2013: 26% of the patient groups responding to the 2014 Corporate-Reputation survey say that the industry’s corporate reputation has improved (against 18.9% saying the same in 2013).

But, even so, European patient groups express mixed emotions in 2014 about aspects of pharma: from the hope engendered in patients by a number of important new clinical trials, to the disbelief that reimbursement authorities refuse to approve some of pharma’s latest products on the grounds of the high prices set by the companies.

The lowest ratings awarded by Europe-based patient groups to pharma activities in 2014 relate to the ability (or otherwise) of pharma companies to implement fair pricing policies. As many as 43.4% of the 550 respondent Europe-based patient groups think pharma poor at pricing products fairly. This opinion is held by 63% of French patient groups, by 57% of those in Italy, 53% in Germany, 53% in the UK, and 50% in Austria [see chart, below].

Comments offered by the respondent Europe-based patient groups show that areas of distrust between patient groups and pharma include the following: pharma corruption scandals, and litigation against pharma; the possibility that health professionals may be in the pocket of the industry; absence of robust science when presenting clinical data; lack of patient access to expensive new drugs; excessive profit-making; and … not taking patients’ needs and viewpoints into consideration.

rob halkes's insight:

Great insights again in the next edition of PatientView's report on pharma reputation!

European Patient groups Europe-based patient groups regard pharma more positively in 2014 than they did in 2013! But there are drawbacks too Read it here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

How Pharma Can Offer More than Pills

How Pharma Can Offer More than Pills | New pharma | Scoop.it

For years, there has been a push within the pharmaceutical industry to move “beyond the pill” —  in other words, to build and deploy complementary services and solutions to diversify revenue sources. The rationale is simple and elegant: A company with experience selling pharmaceutical products should be able to successfully and profitably sell its large customers (health plans, delivery systems, and governments) other health care offerings.

The impetus to move beyond the pill typically arises from one or two realizations: 1) medicines alone are often not enough for patients to achieve optimal clinical outcomes, and 2) as pharmaceutical pipelines dry up, beyond-the-pill businesses can be valuable new sources of revenues.

However, many beyond-the-pill efforts have sputtered or died. During my years working as a pharmaceutical industry executive and advisor to senior management, I have observed that these initiatives typically fail because of one of three challenges:

Leadership.[..]

Regulatory environment. [..]

Access to capital [..]

Recruit industry outsiders [..]

Form partnerhsips [...]

Revise regulations [...]

Avoid stand alone solutions [...]

Integrate clinical trials [...]
The world will continue to need companies that develop and commercialize new medicines. Those same companies must not lose sight of this fact and recruit the right leadership to use around-the-pill services, solutions, and tools to enhance the clinical effectiveness and commercial success of their core products...


rob halkes's insight:

Inspiring article Sachin. Good to see how your experience in the field made you pick and select the best tips to go beyond the pill.
We just finished a study about the activities taken by Pharma companies to go this way. Some of your tips are being underscored by the findings, others demonstrate how it is not an easy task from the perspectivce of the traditional blockbuster business model. One of the major conclusions is indeed that knowledge about what added value might be in healthcare and what the difference is between products, services and solutions are key. Besides, and even more so: development and testing services and solutions is one thing: delivering is quite a different game. Not only does the very intention impact the demands to customer relationships: how they are developed into a conditional quality of such relations, but the question of how to get revenue for the added value is quite a challenge. These things have to be thought through before scaling solutions/services to be sure about reimbursement.
See here for the study report: http://social.eyeforpharma.com/content/value-added-services-2015
Rob Halkes @rohal

more...
Dinesh Chindarkar's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:56 AM

Inspiring article Sachin. Good to see how your experience in the field made you pick and select the best tips to go beyond the pill.
We just finished a study about the activities taken by Pharma companies to go this way. Some of your tips are being underscored by the findings, others demonstrate how it is not an easy task from the perspectivce of the traditional blockbuster business model. One of the major conclusions is indeed that knowledge about what added value might be in healthcare and what the difference is between products, services and solutions are key. Besides, and even more so: development and testing services and solutions is one thing: delivering is quite a different game. Not only does the very intention impact the demands to customer relationships: how they are developed into a conditional quality of such relations, but the question of how to get revenue for the added value is quite a challenge. These things have to be thought through before scaling solutions/services to be sure about reimbursement.
See here for the study report: http://social.eyeforpharma.com/content/value-added-services-2015
Rob Halkes @rohal

Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Value Added Services 2015 | Thought leadership and innovation for the Pharmaceutical Industry - EyeforPharma

Value Added Services 2015 | Thought leadership and innovation for the Pharmaceutical Industry - EyeforPharma | New pharma | Scoop.it

3 tailored roadmap's to solutions in healthcare beyond the pill.


- Understand the creation of successful services by looking at organizational structure and internal processes, how to partner with external stakeholders, and how to make projects economically viable.

- A roadmap tailored to your company with three scenarios for creation, development, implementation and up-scaling of ‘Value Added Services’.

- In-depth case studies of company-wide initiatives and specific projects, such as Janssen Healthcare Innovation, Sanofi Integrated Care, Pfizer Integrated Health, Grunenthal´s ‘My pain feels like’ and Boehringer-Ingelheim´s ‘Picasso’.

rob halkes's insight:

I was as happy to conduct the research for Eyeforpharma's Value Added Services Report. It changes the view on how pharma could integrate its different market approaches to focus and be more effective. Effective: both in services to customers and patients, and in commercial return.

I gave already some presentations and workshops to interested audiences, e.g. see here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Corporate reputation of pharma (from a patient perspective) in 2014 -37 companies ranked

Corporate reputation of pharma (from a patient perspective) in 2014 -37 companies ranked | New pharma | Scoop.it

PRESS RELEASE FROM PATIENTVIEW: 'The Corporate Reputation of Pharma in 2014—the Patient Perspective’, and how the corporate reputation of pharma companies has changed over the past four years

An independent study by PatientView

• Findings based on a survey of 1,150 patient groups (from 58 countries and of differing specialties)
• Survey conducted mid-November 2014 to mid-January 2015
• Patient-group feedback on the corporate reputation of the entire pharma industry during 2014
• Patient-group feedback on the corporate reputation of 37 individual pharma companies in 2014
• Results for 2014 are compared with those of 2013, 2012, and 2011

The 37 pharma companies reviewed in the study are: AbbVie l Actavis l Allergan l Amgen l Astellas l AstraZeneca l Baxter International l Bayer l Biogen Idec l Boehringer-Ingelheim l Bristol-Myers Squibb l Celgene l Eisai l Eli Lilly (Lilly) l Gilead l GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) l Grũnenthal l Ipsen l Janssen l Lundbeck l Menarini l Merck & Co (USA) l Merck KgA (Germany) l Mylan l Novartis l Novo Nordisk l Otsuka l Pfizer l Roche l Sanofi l Servier l Shire l Stada Arzneimittel l Takeda l Teva l UCB l ViiV Healthcare [...]

The majority of patient groups respondent in 2014 acknowledge (as "excellent" or "good") pharma’s innovative capabilities, and its ability to ensure patient safety. However, the majority of patient groups do not believe that the industry is “excellent” or “good” in its other activities. These further activities are:

Having a good relationship with the media / Providing high-quality information for patients / Providing access to clinical trials / Having a patient-centred strategy / Acting with integrity / Managing adverse news about products / Having ethical marketing practices / Providing services to patients outside its business remit / Being transparent in all corporate activities / Practising philanthropic activities / Fair pricing policies

rob halkes's insight:

PRESS RELEASE FROM PATIENTVIEW: 'The Corporate Reputation of Pharma in 2014—the Patient Perspective’, and how the corporate reputation of pharma companies has changed over the past four years.

Remarkable: it shows that health care insurances and payors fall below the industry's reputation of pharma!


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Nurturing change in pharma marketing - PMLiVE

Nurturing change in pharma marketing - PMLiVE | New pharma | Scoop.it

At the turn of the millennium, as the industry began its painful descent from the summit of the blockbuster era, the optimisation of sales resources in a changing environment was global pharma's biggest strategic challenge.

Arguably, it still is. The days when vast armies of representatives descended on GPs in their droves have long departed;[..]

But, as the wider world adapts to technological evolution, even pharma is not immune to the need for real change. In fact, if managed appropriately, technology could provide the catalyst for optimal, efficient and highly effective sales engagement. [..]The rapid development of digital, mobile and ambient technologies has transformed the global communications paradigm, and, with it, set new expectations in how consumers and professionals consume information.[..]he next phase of commercial optimisation will focus not on the death, but on the depth of a salesman. The development of a more nuanced, multichannel approach, where organisations harness technology and leverage communications and insight across a variety of channels, can support and supplement the work of the field force. By adopting a balanced, multichannel approach with the sales force at the centre, companies can enjoy deeper engagement, build deeper relationships and communicate the depth of information that customers in the value-based economy require.[..]

The word 'multichannel' is now de rigueur in marketing circles, but in the pharmaceutical industry, it's a look that's proving difficult to pull off. In the real world, however, it's a simple proposition. “The Holy Grail is having a mixture of channels that enable you to engage with the broadest contingent of customers, with the requisite frequency, to help influence prescribing and change behaviours,” says Julian. “From a sales perspective, the routes to market are manifold. For example, the medical representative, KAM, hospital representative and MSL (medical scientific liaison) are all different channels. So too are call centres, web-enabled remote representatives and other forms of online engagement. The industry is looking at lots of different ways in which it can engage, but - crucially - none of them are mutually exclusive.

Perhaps that's the major obstacle: mutual exclusivity runs deep in pharma's operational psyche. “To progress, everything needs to be integrated across all channels. However, although pharma is putting all these channels in place, they still operate them in silos,” says Jan. [..]”

The future model of pharmaceutical sales will almost certainly be multichannel - but, despite the harbingers of doom, the sales professional will remain the driving force. “The best multichannel approaches will comprise the proper alignment of human and digital resources,” says Jan. “Technology can help provide scale, speed, intelligence and analytics - but it's only by putting human resource at the centre of communications that multichannel can fully deliver.”

rob halkes's insight:

Multichannel - Surely, Integrating technology with human face-to-face meetings? Right on. Knowing the customer in its characteristics, preferences and demands? Even more so.

Sales forces, rather "customer facing forces", to signal the multidisciplinary, cross functional obligation from all "inside", are here to stay. But, one needs to remember that multichannel in this respect is only refering to the means, the instruments of communication! Don't forget content management that goes right with it. One would say, that it's what they meant here, but little has been said about it.

Pharma people need to learn how not to tell the same message again and again, but to build on the messages an interaction with customers to a higher level of relation quality. 'Quality' to be measured in development from information to common interests, goals and co-creation - the end game of "sales"! If such quality is not build in, boredom and annoyance rise and create dislike of meetings: "Don't send me any more information, I've had them" ...

When however, common interests lead to new collaboration, pharma needs to be ready to invest time, expertise and money into better solutions to the common end: better care and better health outcomes. If not, no relations will last, and the only value is in the product. That is good, of course, but in the advanced markets, it's not enough.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Different healthcare systems influence marketing practices by pharmaceutical companies

Different healthcare systems influence marketing practices by pharmaceutical companies | New pharma | Scoop.it

Countries have different healthcare systems to provide access to medical services and prescription medications for their citizens. The healthcare system model determines access to basic care, compensation for medical professionals and how fast innovative new drugs are available from medical providers. The way healthcare systems influence the marketing practices of pharmaceutical companies is explored by comparing the healthcare systems of the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), Germany and Poland.In this article, George Sillup and Marta Makowska compare the healthcare systems in the US, UK, Germany and Poland. They explore the different ways in which these systems influence the marketing practices of pharmaceutical companies. ...

rob halkes's insight:

That's why it is so "d...." necessary for pharma companys to learn how to differentiate their market approach to different countries with different health care systems, decision making structures and reimbursement rules.


Lots of Pharma companies have been thinking that new procedures of market access would do the needed trick.  -   They must have learned by now, that this is not the only thing. ..


We have been publishing about it already in 2009, see here http://slidesha.re/12ML9yk

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Essentials for Pharma Key Account Management

Essentials for Pharma Key Account Management | New pharma | Scoop.it
Pharma companies must adapt to vast changes in health care by forming long-term strategic relationships founded on joint value creation with customers.
  • Few pharma companies have revised their customer models in light of the vast changes in health care that are transforming customers.
  • Effective key account management helps foster partnerships to create long-term mutual value and advantage.
  • To get key account management right, pharma companies must gain a deep understanding of their customers, focus on join value creation, forge enduring partnerships, create cross-functional integration, and cultivate an entrepreneurial mindset.
See Also the original blog for more information

Vast changes in the health care landscape worldwide are transforming customers. Treatment decision making is rapidly shifting from the individual physician to a diverse set of institutional customers, from hospitals to integrated care entities, and from payers to pharmacies and health-benefit-management companies. The pressure to deliver greater value is also driving this evolution. And while some customers are already more sophisticated than others, all are building experience and new capabilities to improve their economic performance and better manage patient outcomes.

The experience of hospitals offers a good example not only of how these market pressures are affecting institutions but also of the new ways in which institutional customers are responding to them. With health-care reimbursement levels shrinking, hospitals are consolidating, and they are building scale and expertise in the process. Most hospitals now employ a variety of analytical tools, such as benchmarks and studies, to evaluate price, cost effectiveness, and outcomes. They are also creating new positions in their management teams to bridge the traditionally segregated clinical and procurement domains. And they are launching or expanding efforts to assess medicines and procedures in their patient populations. Moreover, they are using the knowledge they gain through these efforts to improve formularies and treatment protocols.

The more sophisticated payers and integrated providers are also investing heavily in building capabilities. Increasingly, these customers are adopting a holistic approach to health care, partnering with pharmaceutical companies to improve outcomes, disease management, and compliance.

Despite these dramatic developments in the customer landscape, however, many pharma companies have yet to adapt their customer models. When key account management in the pharmaceutical industry is compared with that of other industries, including consumer goods and industrial products, it’s clear that most pharma companies are still lagging. Here’s why:

  • Pharma companies don’t fully recognize the range of customers’ business drivers and needs. A one-size-fits-all-approach, even when designed for the most important customers, no longer works.
  • Companies think transactionally instead of strategically. Pharma companies often put short-term concerns ahead of long-term considerations—for example, focusing on getting the highest possible price or the greatest revenues right away instead of weighing customers’ economic situations and evolving needs.
  • Companies overcomplicate their customer management models. In an effort to keep pace with the growing complexities of customer requirements, pharma companies often end up tailoring individual customer relationships to an unsustainable degree. The result is reduced quality, unnecessary complexity, and inefficiencies that erode the profit potential of key accounts.
  • Customer management is hampered by conflicting roles and responsibilities. Customer-facing functions, from account management and medical affairs to business units and support departments, often end up tripping all over each other—and the customer. The resulting redundancies and confusion can do more to erode value than to create it.
  • Key account managers (KAMs) often lack the right competencies, and companies don’t seek or cultivate these skills. The best sales-line managers and sales representatives don’t necessarily make the best KAMs. Unfortunately, many pharma companies still struggle to recruite and promote people who have the skill sets that key account management requires. So far, few organizations have embedded the development of those skills in their hiring, training, and promotion processes.
These weaknesses limit pharma companies’ ability to serve their largest, most complex customers effectively. Pharma companies are already losing out on opportunities to create value through partnerships with health care systems and the broader community of health care stakeholders, largely because such relationships require cross-functional capabilities.

Effective key account management, in our view, depends on cross-functional integration to deliver value. Many pharma companies do practice some form of key account management, but gaps exist in even the best-managed companies.

rob halkes's insight:

Key Account Management is for pharma the most difficult service to develop! It needs an internal collaboration between siloed departments that one hasn't exercised for the last 10 to 20 years.

Yet, there's no way out outherwise than to give your customers the right attention to get partnerships. A partnership that goes further than just drug promotion and delivery...

more...
Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:34 AM

BCG's vision about KAM. a dream?

Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

The Supply Chain Of The Future A Strategic View

The Supply Chain Of The Future A Strategic View | New pharma | Scoop.it

Evolutionary theory teaches us it is neither the strongest nor the most intelligent of the species that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. Ingredient suppliers, manufacturers, quality standards and audits, and logistics are just a few areas where we can expect to see many changes. Adapting to these changes will be critical to everyone involved in the process and in ensuring that medicines are delivered to patients safely and effectively.

The pharma supply chain has certainly undergone significant change in the last 40 years. In the 1970s and 1980s very little outsourcing was performed in pharma. Companies had separate domestic and international divisions, each with its own manufacturing. In the 1990s, API manufacturing became globalized, global quality standards were rolled out, and generic and biotech manufacturers emerged.


In the first decade of the 21st century, dosage-form manufacturing went global, companies instituted operational improvement programs, external supply departments were established, and outsourced products were managed more consistently. There was also greater scrutiny, with regulatory actions increasing exponentially. Business interruptions are now pervasive, with plant shutdowns resulting in drug shortages and higher manufacturing costs.

Take A Strategic Approach
To improve supply chain performance and avoid costly and disruptive delays, companies must take a strategic approach. This begins with setting goals that redefine performance. First and foremost, pharma must make 100% customer service levels their top priority. Pharma should strive for short cycle times, low inventory levels, and no products on the drug shortage list. Quality levels should be set that consistently beat expectations, including zero regulatory actions, processes with advanced warning systems in place, and value driven decisions being made at every level. Waste elimination must also be a top priority.

Part of a strategic approach involves the preparation of a strategic plan. Several factors should be considered when preparing this plan. Counterfeiting and diversion are things the industry has to attack smartly and aggressively. To do this effectively, everyone in the supply chain has to be held accountable. Counterfeiters must be identified and prosecuted wherever in the world they happen to be. We must also devise creative solutions to fight counterfeiting quickly and effectively. These solutions must be supported by everyone, including regulators.

Pharma companies must take needed steps to reinvent outsourcing. To assist in managing suppliers, firms should establish a set of GSPs (good supplier practices). Part of this is developing a set of metrics for suppliers and improving the way customers and suppliers communicate with each other. Cracking down on poor cGMP practices will require drug developers to support the audit services industry and the push for manufacturing uniformity. This should consist of an alignment of standards for product classes, consistent penalties for risky behavior, a drive for consistency across regions, and a consolidation of industry support organizations. We also need to see stronger integration of information technology in the supply chain, a seamless integration of data with suppliers, and investment in continuous manufacturing, electronic batch records, automated processes, and other IT advancements we have seen in other industries.

Finally, there needs to be a greater focus on getting operational excellence right. Manufacturers must attack variability, waste, and inefficient processes with a vengeance. Managers must engage and motivate employees from top to bottom, while focusing on mindsets and behaviors. A focus on training will be essential, and when new ideas are adopted, they cannot be hypothetical. Managers must make sure the improvements are actually happening on the factory floor.

Are You Making Progress?
Once changes are made, how can you know progress is being made? There are several metrics that can be used to gauge progress.

Critical drug shortages should be rare, and customer service metrics should indicate a 99% or greater shipment completion rate. The pharmaceutical industry should be managing suppliers better than any other industry in the world. When regulatory actions have been all but eliminated, medicines are available to all at an appropriate cost, and when we have altered the risk/reward situation for diverters and counterfeiters, we will know we are making progress.

If changes are done correctly, drug manufacturers will not only secure their supply chains and reputations, but also will have the highest levels of compliance and customer service. The result will be safer medicines, fewer adverse events, and lower costs for pharma.


rob halkes's insight:

Supply chain innovation in pharma, not the highest priority? Still a "need-to-inspect" in light of outsourcing, counterfeit, customer services, cGMP and GSP. Also an area for co-creation ;-)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rob halkes from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

FDA Proposes Guidelines for Posting Medical-Product Information Online

A lot can be misconstrued in the silent world of the Internet. While online technology has changed the communications paradigm, it also has resulted in bad information, embarrassing typos, factual errors and malfeasance.

Fake Web sites, botched emails, rambling blogs and photo abuse appear in cyberspace every day. Most of it is innocuous. But the stakes are higher for the medical community as it adapts to and enters the digital realm.

“In today’s world, in addition to traditional sources of medical product information, patients and health care providers regularly get information about FDA-regulated medical products through social media and other Internet sources, and those technologies continue to evolve,” wrote Thomas Abrams, of the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Prescription Drug Promotion, on the FDAVoice blog. “But regardless of the Internet source used to communicate about medical products, the public health is best served by clear, accurate, truthful and non-misleading information about them.”

The agency has acknowledged the convenience, importance and popularity of social media as a resource for the medical community and industry-at-large by developing a set of best practices for current and future sites. The best practices come in the form of two proposed guidances, the goals of which are to help companies state the purposes of their products with the utmost honesty.

Both guidances relate to medical devices and prescription drugs.

“These documents strive to ensure that the information provided by drug and device companies is accurate and will help patients to make well-informed decisions in consultation with their health care providers,” Abrams wrote.

The first guidance addresses posting information to Twitter and paid-search sites that have character limits. The task of presenting the benefits and risks of a product in 140 characters or less can be daunting – and dangerous.  Both sides of the story need to be told, and a link or a phone number should be provided to give consumers a way to get more information from the company or an additional source.

The second guidance recommends ways for companies to correct information relayed about their products online, whether in a blog or on a Facebook post, whether negative or positive.

“We developed these new guidances, in part, to respond to requests for best practices from companies and other stakeholders,” Abrams wrote. “We gave careful thought to our draft recommendations, and we understand technology will continue to evolve.”

Because of the inherent risks posed by medical devices (defects) and prescription drugs (addiction), and their respective benefits (improved lifespan and disease prevention), the agency prioritized the proposed guidances.

“As a regulatory agency, we are committed to ensuring that the information about these products that their manufacturers and distributors direct at patients and health care providers is accurate and balanced,” Abrams wrote.




Via Plus91
rob halkes's insight:

The world does open up for information on line, also about medical products ! 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rob halkes
Scoop.it!

Digital Strategy in Pharma: 7 Questions You Should Be Asking About Your Brand

Digital Strategy in Pharma: 7 Questions You Should Be Asking About Your Brand | New pharma | Scoop.it

In the wake of some of the biggest pharma deals of the year, industry marketers gathered to discuss their digital strategies at iPharma 2014. Like its sister sector, healthcare, pharmaceuticals has been slower to adopt new media and technology than consumer goods, but industry leaders now recognize the significant impact online activities have on their brands’ reputations. Despite regulatory challenges, the presentations all focused on positive—and possible—shifts communicators can make to better serve patients and physicians. Here are some guiding questions based on the speakers’ presentations you can use to focus your marketing and strengthen your brand. 

1. Are you interacting with your patients online?

As consumers ourselves, we know the power of online interaction and how it drives customer behavior. Digital health is no different. One study showed that 95 million Americans use smartphones for health info, a 27 percent increase from last year. Patients also spend nearly 52 hours per year reading health information online. [...]

2. Are you using data to target your marketing efforts? 

Whether it’s studying your customers’ online behaviors or tapping into predictive analytics, big data is a key way to stretch your marketing dollar. Technology now even allows you to pinpoint the smartphone users near a particular doctor’s office. [...]

3. Are you communicating clearly with your team about your brand? 

Great brand strategies resonate through all levels of an organization, from research and development to human resources. [...]

4. Is the customer at the heart of your marketing plan? 

To often, brands misstep by placing themselves at the center of a strategic marketing plan. They ask, “What information do we want to give?” rather than ”What information do our consumers want to hear?” [...]

5. Are your communications authentic? 

Storytelling has become a key component of marketing and branding in recent years. Some of this is a result of the 78 percent of internet users who watch or download videos online. Videos that go viral often tug at our heartstrings but only resonate when the storytelling is original or authentic.

6. Are you building programs for short-term results or lasting impact?

Because everything is changing so rapidly in the pharma space, marketing KPIs are often skewed for quick, c-suite-approved results: “likes,” on Facebook, “retweets,” etc. These results are not insignificant, but they aren’t necessarily indicators of longevity. [...]

7. Are you listening? 

To your patients? To your physicians? To your employees?  What are your customers looking for? Seek to assuage anxiety by providing answers, comfort, or community via content marketing, videos, and website development. Katharine Patterson, Global Communications Manager for GE Healthcare, closed her presentation with a simple but powerful directive, “Be a human first. Then a marketer.”

rob halkes's insight:

Yes, Great rules and principles for the health industry, also so long known already. But indeed, they are still worth telling. It is not that they have been adhered too yet by the industry ;-)

more...
No comment yet.