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Microsoft's Tough Friday: Software giant battles hackers, malware, and a cloud outage | PCWorld

Microsoft's Tough Friday: Software giant battles hackers, malware, and a cloud outage | PCWorld | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Software giant Microsoft saw its Azure cloud service crash, its Mac systems hacked, and a malware intrusion.
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Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media

Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

The rise of social media—content created by Internet users and hosted by popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Wikipedia, and blogs—has brought several new hazards for medical professionalism. First, many physicians may find applying principles for medical professionalism to the online environment challenging in certain contexts. Second, physicians may not consider the potential impact of their online content on their patients and the public. Third, a momentary lapse in judgment by an individual physician to create unprofessional content online can reflect poorly on the entire profession. To overcome these challenges, we encourage individual physicians to realize that as they “tread” through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a “footprint” that may have unintended negative consequences for them and for the profession at large. We also recommend that institutions take a proactive approach to engage users of social media in setting consensus-based standards for “online professionalism.” Finally, given that professionalism encompasses more than the avoidance of negative behaviors, we conclude with examples of more positive applications for this technology. Much like a mirror, social media can reflect the best and worst aspects of the content placed before it for all to see.

KEY WORDS: professionalism, internet use, medical ethics, health policy
INTRODUCTION

The Internet has changed many interactions between professionals and the public. The recent development of Web 2.0 applications (also known as “social media”) has created particular hazards for public views of certain professions. School teachers1 and lawyers2 across the country have been sanctioned or fired for online indiscretions felt to violate societal expectations for how they represent their personal lives in the public sphere. Recently, similar incidents have also involved physicians. In one instance, physicians and other health professionals delivering aid in Haiti posted pictures online of naked and unconscious patients in operating suites, and of physicians drinking or posing with grins and “thumbs up” in front of patients or coffins.3 While it is tempting to view such incidents as rare events, recent research has shown that posting of unprofessional content is common among medical students, residents, and other health care providers.46 In many cases, users of social media may simply fail to consider issues of professionalism in their online actions and may, in fact, routinely display exemplary ethics and character in their offline actions. As a case in point, the professionals cited above exemplified principles of altruism and social justice through their volunteer work in Haiti and were ultimately exonerated by licensing authorities.7 Still, damage to public perceptions of the medical aid effort was already done. Rather than blaming the technology or vilifying the user, we believe this example underscores the need for improved education and communication about the use of social media by professionals.8,9

ONLINE ACTIVITY, MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM, AND THE PUBLIC

Although principles and commitments for medical professionalism already exist,10 we believe that many physicians may have difficulty applying these principals to their online actions for at least three reasons. First, some of the online content that has been identified as unprofessional in both the medical literature and mass media may not clearly violate existing principles of medical professionalism. For example, some physicians may not realize that images of off-duty drinking on a social networking site may raise questions from the public about unprofessional behavior, especially if intoxication is implied. A second and related concern is that many people experience a sense of disinhibition in their online actions. Social media in particular can create a perception of anonymity and detachment from social cues and consequences for online actions.11 Thus, medical professionals may say or do things they would not say or do in person, such as disclosure of confidential information (including pictures of patients), or display speech and behaviors that are disrespectful to colleagues or patients and their families. Third, the potential impact of such indiscretions is much greater than typical face-to-face interactions because of the wide reach of this media. While physicians must always be vigilant to avoid violating patient confidentiality, a slip made online can have far greater impact than one made over lunch with a colleague.

Regrettably, social media can enable content posted in a momentary lapse in judgment to spread rapidly beyond the intended audience with a simple “click.” In this sense, social media can act as a mirror reflecting intimate thoughts and behaviors back to oneself as well as to others around the world. For an increasingly Internet-savvy public, “images” reflected by this social media mirror may prove very important in sizing up not only the credentials, but also the character of professionals. Moreover, when amplified by press coverage, unprofessional images of professionals in the social media mirror may also be magnified or distorted as in the case of the physicians providing aid in Haiti.

While rigorous studies on patient perceptions of physicians’ social media use are lacking, recent media coverage of the topic12 and online reader responses, such as the following, are illuminating: “Medicine is a very serious profession…[but] teetering on the edge of respectability and trust in some areas. Soon there will be so little trust that it will undermine the respectable people who have chosen this profession.”13 Other readers posted similar comments, “Anybody who isn't smart enough to figure out what's OK to post on the Internet has absolutely no business being in charge of other people's health,” and “As professionals, doctors, teachers, lawyers, etc., are held to a certain standard. If that's not your cup of tea, find a different job.” These comments suggest that some may view a physician’s online activity as a proxy for the common sense and trustworthiness needed to handle the responsibilities of patient care. Moreover, when technology such as social media has the ability to alter ways in which physicians can interact with individual patients and the public at large, physicians must reconsider the implications of their professional commitments.14 While it may not be necessary to expand the existing framework for professionalism, physicians should at least consider the issues raised by social media and make informed decisions for themselves, or in collaboration with colleagues or superiors, to decide what is appropriate and inappropriate for their group, institution, or workplace as they represent themselves in a new web where user-generated content abounds.

SUGGESTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS AND INSTITUTIONS

To illustrate the impact of an individual’s online actions, the Pew Internet and American Life Project has advanced the idea that each Internet user creates a “digital footprint.”15 This concept encourages individuals to think of downstream consequences for each online action they take and become aware that as they “tread” through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a “footprint.” This footprint is visible to others and may have unintended negative consequences, such as diminishing one’s chances to obtain a desired training position or job. But beyond the self-interested rationale for monitoring online activity to protect themselves, physicians also have a duty to consider the broader impact of their “digital footprint” and how their online actions reflect on the profession at large—much in the way that the concept of a “carbon footprint” invokes the greater cause of environmentalism. Thus, the concept of “think globally, act locally” applies to physician behavior online in the same way it applies to human behavior in relation to the environment; each individual physician should develop a greater consciousness of the potential impact of their online actions for the entire profession.

Beyond the role of individuals, institutions have an important role to play in defining and exemplifying what might be called “online professionalism.” As yet, there are no widely accepted guidelines to assist individuals and institutions in navigating challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism while online. Even medical schools, which oversee the youngest members of the profession and the most frequent users of social media, have not universally formed policies specifically addressing this issue.4 Accordingly, we suggest that institutions—from medical schools and residencies to hospitals and group practices—should take a proactive stance in setting guidelines and standards for their members. We propose that institutional standards for “online professionalism” utilize valuable concepts such as the digital footprint and emphasize the power of social media to reflect professional values to the public. We also believe that the best way to develop institutional concepts for online professionalism is to engage various users of these technologies in a consensus-oriented dialogue that involves students, patients, educators, clinicians, and administrators. Such dialogue, especially if it is sustained over time, also has the potential to reduce the number of problems arising from the use of social media by virtue of the shared educational impact of discussing the standards for online professionalism that are agreeable to all parties involved. Indeed, emerging research with medical students and residents suggests that most feel responsibility to represent themselves professionally online, and while they oppose strict regulation of their online behavior, increased dialogue and guidance is welcomed.16,17

THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA TO PROMOTE MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM

Problematic uses of social media by physicians have garnered a great deal of public attention to date. Yet an equally important challenge for medical professionals is to use the mirror of social media positively. For example, respectful clinical narratives written by medical students that avoid disclosing any personally identifiable information about patients can promote understanding, reflection, and greater appreciation of the patient-physician relationship.18,19 Students have also used social media to improve patient safety by promoting the World Health Organization’s Surgical Checklist.20 Practicing physicians can use social networking and other Web 2.0 tools to share sound medical information and help the public interpret medical studies, thereby becoming sources of credible medical information on the Internet. Some have even argued that maintaining an online presence that is accessible and useful to patients is a must for physicians.21 Indeed, a compelling case for quality improvement through better communication via social media can be made,22 and medical professionalism encompasses a commitment to quality improvement.10 An increasing number of public health organizations, hospitals, and medical centers are using social networking applications to provide medical information to the public.23 Collectively, these interactions can serve as a counter-balance to less trustworthy sources of information as the public increasingly turns to the Internet to find health information.

If social media is a mirror, what kind of reflections does the public see of physicians? While many Internet sites offer ratings of physicians,24 and it is believed that patients already search the Internet for information about their physicians frequently,25 we do not yet know the net impact of positive and negative online behaviors on the public’s overall view of physicians’ professional values. Certainly, the principle of “first, do no harm” should apply to physicians’ use of social media, but we can do better. Just as we must look beyond harm reduction towards health promotion in clinical practice, we must go farther than curtailing unprofessional behavior online and embrace the positive potential for social media: physicians and health care organizations can and should utilize the power of social media to facilitate interactions with patients and the public that increase their confidence in the medical profession. If we fail to engage this technology constructively, we will lose an important opportunity to expand the application of medical professionalism within contemporary society. Moreover, a proactive approach on the part of physicians may strengthen our patients’ understanding of medical professionalism and provide an example of “online professionalism” for other professions to consider.


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6 Undeniable Reasons Why The Future of Web Design is Responsive

6 Undeniable Reasons Why The Future of Web Design is Responsive | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

...There are two major methods for creating a mobile websites Responsive Design and Mobile Templates. Responsive design requires you only have one website that is coded to adapt to all screen size no matter what the device it’s being displayed on.In contrast, a mobile template is a completely separate entity requiring you to have a second mobile only website or sub-domain.


Mobile templates are also built for each specific, not per screen size. This can cause some issues as we will discuss below.


Responsive design, a term originally coined in a  2010 A List Apart article  by Ethan Marcotte, responsive design has been by far the most popular and widely used method for designing a mobile website. Here are just a few of the undeniable reasons your website needs to be responsive....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, Today, 2:09 AM

Luke Summerfield explains why having a responsive website is so critical to your marketing and some key considerations to keep in mind when designing a responsive website.

July 31st-MY BDAY! ¶'s curator insight, Today, 2:29 AM

As a new WordPress blogger (but not a noob by any stretch of the imagination!), I'd become confused between all the choices in themes that promised to be "super-responsive." I had no idea what that really meant.

 

Or why it even mattered. A blog is a blog is a blog, right? Right?

I am not 100% wrong, but I am 100% not-right.

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6 Undeniable Reasons Why The Future of Web Design is Responsive

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DIY Product/Demo Video Making - Animaker

DIY Product/Demo Video Making - Animaker | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Animaker.com is a cloud-based do-it-yourself (#DIY) video making app that is bringing studio quality professional animation tools within reach of everyone. Exclusively crafted to suit the DIY explainer video makers, it features a wide array of several in-built tools that address the growing demand of animated video making....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 29, 11:29 PM

Can't wait to try this promising looking video animation tool. 

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5 Cool PowerPoint Slide Design Tools

5 Cool PowerPoint Slide Design Tools | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Are you hankering to give your PowerPoint presentations a visual boost? Do you want to get away from the "I did this in PowerPoint look" that you (and everyone else) get from using PowerPoint's built in templates? Do you need a timeline slide or help finding graphics to illustrate your slide content?


If you answer yes to any of these questions, then take a look at these five great—and free—design tools. They can help you enhance your PowerPoint presentations and speed up the design process.


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, July 21, 3:57 PM

Mejores diapositivas para PowerPoint...

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, Today, 12:00 AM

Good advice and useful PowerPoint design tools.

Brooke Hall's curator insight, Today, 8:43 AM

Check out these FREE designs!

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AutoGrid | With AutoGrid, big data becomes a new source of energy.

AutoGrid | With AutoGrid, big data becomes a new source of energy. | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
AutoGrid Systems analyzes the exponentially expanding wave of data being generated by smart meters, building management systems, voltage regulators, thermostats and other equipment so utilities and end-users can obtain precise insight into where...

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Top 17 Best Facebook Marketing Survival Tips Online #Infographics

Top 17 Best Facebook Marketing Survival Tips Online #Infographics | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Infographic on Facebook viral Marketing strategies and guide with best Facebook marketing tips along with using Google+ Plus, LinkedIn Social networks
See it on Scoop.it, via MarketingHits
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Understanding User Expectations

Understanding User Expectations | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Self-service access to analytics is becoming a key component when trying to expand BI and analytics access throughout the organization. For SMBs, this is especially important.
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Cisco warns that network virtualization does have its downsides

Cisco warns that network virtualization does have its downsides | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Cisco has just posted a new whitepaper online, in which it suggests that virtualization of networks can be somewhat counterproductive, resulting in reduced productivity.
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Analytics break: Big Data market splits into rival camps

Analytics break: Big Data market splits into rival camps | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
A new trend has emerged in the open-source Big Data  ecosystem over the last few months: top vendors scaling back and sometimes completely abandoning internal efforts to develop homegrown versions of hot new projects in favor of forming strategic...
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Economics for Orcs: how can virtual world economies inform national economies and those who design them? | The Policy and Internet Blog

Economics for Orcs: how can virtual world economies inform national economies and those who design them? | The Policy and Internet Blog | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
What can ‘real’ economies and the economists who run them learn from these virtual economies? How can a focus on social fabric -- rather than just on efficiency and output –usefully inform national economies?

Via jean lievens
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Do Not Split HR – At Least Not Ram Charan's Way

Do Not Split HR – At Least Not Ram Charan's Way | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
It needs more than a simple structural fix.
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Marketers Should Not Push Aside The Small Details

Marketers Should Not Push Aside The Small Details | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
In today’s fast-paced marketing world, the data you have on customers’ preferences, habits and history is gold.  But, how much ...
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9 Best Practices For Converting Trial Users Into Paying Customers

9 Best Practices For Converting Trial Users Into Paying Customers | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
What is one best practice for successfully converting users on a free trial to paying customers?
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6 Ways to Alienate The Modern Connected Buyer #SocialSellingz | Kathi Kruse

6 Ways to Alienate The Modern Connected Buyer #SocialSellingz | Kathi Kruse | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Social Selling allows you to be the first to provide value. Being first gives you leverage ahead of the sale, increases your chance to participate and eventually close the sale.


Why is Social Selling so important?

1. It drives revenue.

2. You don’t really have a choice....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, Today, 2:42 AM

Today's connected buyers are looking for businesses like them. Social Selling techniques bridge the gap and drive revenue.

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How to Write An Effective Welcome Email (13 Examples and 3 Templates You Can Steal Today) – Shopify

How to Write An Effective Welcome Email (13 Examples and 3 Templates You Can Steal Today) – Shopify | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Email is one of the best channels at your disposal for marketing your online store. Emails drive traffic, supplement your content marketing, and outperform both Twitter and Facebook for generating sales.


This post is about one of the most important types of emails that you can send out: the “Welcome.” They’re the types of emails you get usually when you submit your email address to an online store....


That’s why you should make your welcome emails great. To make it easy for you, we've put together 13 examples of amazing welcome emails (including their subject lines), as well as three templates that you can steal, and finally the apps you can deploy to make your emails the best that they can be....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, Today, 12:05 AM

Email lessons and great examples.

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Turtles 9/11 Poster destined for PR fail infamy

Turtles 9/11 Poster destined for PR fail infamy | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Earlier today, Paramount Pictures Australia tweeted a poster which features the Ninja Turtles jumping from an exploding building. No problem, right? How about if the release date for the film in Australia is September 11th? Still not a problem, you say?


How about if the poster that was tweeted has the Ninja Turtles jumping from a New York City building that’s exploding with "SEPTEMBER 11" in bold lettering at the bottom? And Leonardo has a NYC pin in blue and white just so you’re extra-aware that you’re in New York City?...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 29, 11:23 PM

Marketing effort sucks here for lack of sensitivity. PR fail big time!

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Slide Captain - create and present your ideas

Slide Captain - create and present your ideas | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
SlideCaptain empowers you to create and share stylish online presentations.


Insert nearly any web content. Show your work wherever you are and impress your audience. Fully responsive with touch device support.


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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, July 23, 11:24 AM

Slide Captain is a new service for creating multimedia presentations. It runs in your browser, works on all devices, presentations can be embedded on your website or exported as ZIP or PDF files.

At present the service  is free of charge.

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 29, 11:57 PM

Interesting new slide presentation tool.

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CryptoKids: Altcoins, Apps And Authors Aim To Bring Bitcoin To Children

CryptoKids: Altcoins, Apps And Authors Aim To Bring Bitcoin To Children | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
While most adults may still be baffled by bitcoin and bemused by blockchains, a new generation is being introduced to this alternative form of finance by advocates aiming to bring about a “digital currency revolution”.

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How to Make Your Department More Data-Friendly

How to Make Your Department More Data-Friendly | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Big data is doing big things – or it isn't. That's the general sentiment across all industries when it comes to the topic and many professionals are coming up against the same questions: Is big data worth it?
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Answer to OTP Bypass: Out-of-Band Two-Factor Authentication

Answer to OTP Bypass: Out-of-Band Two-Factor Authentication | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Ultimately, OTP-based two-factor authentication using SMS just isn’t the best solution, as shown in these bypass scenarios.
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Ecuador bans Bitcoin, plans to create its own digital currency

Ecuador bans Bitcoin, plans to create its own digital currency | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
While most countries take the wait-and-see approach with regard to Bitcoin and other digital currencies, Ecuador has officially banned them.
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Communication, Knowledge and Information in the Human Ecosystem: p2p Ethnography

Communication, Knowledge and Information in the Human Ecosystem: p2p Ethnography | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
In Universal Exhibitions from the end of the ’800s and beginning of the ’900s, indigenous people were often exposed – under glass houses, in cages or using a variety of media and artefacts – for the entertainment of other people, as if they were...

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Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding

Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Through alternative formative assessment, teachers can check for student understanding without falling back on the tedious or intimidating pop quiz.
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Google: NBCNews Trouble With GoogleBot?

Brian Fitzpatrick, a software engineer manager at Google, posted on Twitter a screen shot of NBCNews.com not being indexed properly by Google.He wrote,
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Consumers Are Loyal to Only Five Brands According to New Study by Silverpop

Consumers Are Loyal to Only Five Brands According to New Study by Silverpop | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it
Coke or Pepsi? Levis or 7s? Tide or OxyClean? Take quick a look at the items around your house. Do ...
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