An Eye on New Media
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An Eye on New Media
New Media in Society, Business & Classrooms
Curated by Ken Morrison
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Facebook is Much Less Addictive When You Remove the Numbers | Big Think

Facebook is Much Less Addictive When You Remove the Numbers | Big Think | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
We all know Facebook is addicting. We whittle away time clicking and liking (and stalking). But how does the social network keep this hold on us?

Shirley Li from The Atlantic sat down with Ben Grosser, a programmer and artist, who believes you can find the answers by looking at the numbers:

"There were times when I was more focused on the numbers than the content itself. I was more interested in how many likes I had instead of who liked it. I realized every time I logged in I looked at those numbers. Why was I caring? Why do I care so much?"

He created a browser extension two years ago to test his hypothesis: The Facebook Demetricator. It hides the numbers. The eye-catching little red number pop-up showing your notifications is replaced by a lighter blue icon. It even hides how many people Like your post—instead you see the general phrase "people like this.” The add-on disarms the site of metrics for you to pour over.

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The extension has been downloaded over 5,000 times, and with it has come feedback and reactions relating to how the tool has changed Facebook for them. Grosser received personal observations of how the site has changed (both positive and negative), and he converted this information into a paper that was published recently in the journal Computational Culture.

There's a numbers game integrated into Facebook that plays on users emotions, cultivating a culture that values self-worth in quantitative terms. You want to have more numbers on your posts, more notifications, more friends—think of the way the “+1 Add Friend” button feels versus the Facebook Demetricator's “Add Friend” button. The language and attention given to metrics makes it become almost like a currency for a game—the more you have, the higher your level. But when Grosser gave users the ability to take away the numbers they'd been pining after, something interesting happened:

"People realized when the numbers were gone, they had been using them to decide whether to like something. I certainly didn't expect these tendencies of people saying, 'I literally don't know what to do [without knowing the metrics].'"

"I think it's a problem when we don't know what those likes mean, when we start focusing on wanting more likes. If we aren't aware of how these numbers are telling us to interact, then it's a problem."

Read more at The Atlantic

Photo Credit: 2nix Studi/ Shutterstock

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SEO Teaching: Should SEO Be Taught at Universities?

SEO Teaching: Should SEO Be Taught at Universities? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Despite the popularity and importance of SEO, the field has yet to gain significant traction at the university level other than a few courses here and there offered as part of a broader digital marketing degree. The tide could be turning, however slowly.
Ken Morrison's insight:

This is my favorite find of the week MOZ (formerly SEOMOZ) shares this article and list of pros/cons of teaching SEO at the college level.

Ken

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16 Legendary Selfies of 2013

To celebrate Oxford Dictionary's International Word of the Year, we looked back at our favorite selfies of 2013.
Ken Morrison's insight:

My Favorite is #5

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SCOOP.IT STUDENTS

SCOOP.IT STUDENTS | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

My students have been working hard with their curation project this semester. My students have a diverse range of career goals. They use Scoop.it to learn about their future careers.

 

This is my second year of using Scoop.it in the curriculum. Previously, i used it as a repository for great resources for students and other faculty. I am confident that teachers of diverse ages or course subjects can integrate curation to help expand the classroom walls and to teaching and applying media literacy.

Ken Morrison's insight:


I encourage you to visit the students' sites. They are in no order. It would be helpful if you don't just choose the top site and scoll down to give them an equal chance at exposure of their hard work.  Thank you!
Ken 

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The 30 Most Important Women Under 30 In Tech

The 30 Most Important Women Under 30 In Tech | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
They're young. They're smart. And they're doing great things in tech. ;
Ken Morrison's insight:

Our NMT class discusses Sheryl Sandberg. I wish that we had time to study other great women in tech.  Here is a list of 30 young women who have bright futures as leaders in tech.

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I Scoop Therefore I am

I Scoop Therefore I am | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

I Scoop Therefore I am. 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Ken Morrison's insight:

I've been following Martin since the early days of Scoop.it.  I highly suggest his site!

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Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, April 24, 2013 2:29 PM
LOL...Great curation is more other!
Pascale Mousset's comment, April 24, 2013 6:36 PM
Great Scoop Marty ! You re right
Therese Torris's comment, April 25, 2013 4:49 AM
Right on, Marty !
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Curation Connections: My Favorite Links on Curation

Curation Connections: My Favorite Links on Curation | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

This link: Curation Connections! 

 

Big picture: New Media in Society, Business & Classrooms

Ken Morrison's insight:

A scoop of a scoop.  Some of my students are curently working on their curation sites.  Therefore, I am sharing this list of all of my favorite shares on the topic.  It may be helpful for you as well.

My absolute favorite curation site dedicated to curation is:

http://curation.masternewmedia.org

 

I also enjoy watching Karen Dietz (http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it) model great curation skills on Scoop.it

 

Additionally, "Curation Nation" is a wonderful book on the topic.

 

 

 

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Report: 46% Of Social Login Users Still Choose Facebook, But Google Is Quickly Gaining Ground | TechCrunch

Report: 46% Of Social Login Users Still Choose Facebook, But Google Is Quickly Gaining Ground | TechCrunch | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
TechCrunch is a leading technology media property, dedicated to obsessively profiling startups, reviewing new Internet products, and breaking tech news.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaway:

Facebook lost 3% in social logins this past quarter.  Google earned 3%.  This is the second quarter in a row with similar trends.  Social logins are the third-party logins where you have the option of signing in locally or with your social network name/password.

Currently, the rank is Facebook (46%), Google+ (34%) Yahoo (7%) and Twitter (6%), LInkedIN and everyone else 7%)

 

This is big because every login gives these giants even more data about us.  

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Your Phone vs. Your Heart

Your Phone vs. Your Heart | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
The more face-to-face time you spend, the healthier you and your children are.
Ken Morrison's insight:

I am sharing this article because it talks about how our increased use of cell phones is causing us to decrease our ability to connect with others emotionally.

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Exploring students’ understanding of how blogs and blogging can support distance learning in Higher Education

Exploring students’ understanding of how blogs and blogging can support distance learning in Higher Education | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Fig.1. Why Blog? If anything has been written on blogging I want to read it. On 27th September 1999 I posted to my first blog - it was on blogging and new media. We're now in the phase of transitio...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, March 1, 2013 5:24 AM

Blogging

Debbie Elicksen 's curator insight, March 1, 2013 10:05 AM

Realize that students may not consider blogging because they don't know anything about it. This stuff is not taught in most North American schools. I recall speaking to a group of grade 12s and someone asked me what a blog was.

Vance Stevens's curator insight, March 2, 2013 8:22 AM

As if we had to support why blogging is important to students ... well, of course we do, and if you are in the position of reaching into your quivver for the arrow that will hit the target, this one has it all, a research base and a wow graphic. Run this by your curriculum coordinator :-)

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How LinkedIn Is Beating Facebook

How LinkedIn Is Beating Facebook | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
By every meaningful metric, LinkedIn is kicking Facebook's butt.

Via Anita Windisman, Noland Hoshino, Firas Ghunaim
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaway:

I don't think that facebook users or advertisers are going to be going anywhere any time soon.  Yet, I do agree that LinkedIn is doing some great things to keep people engaged in their online ecosystem.

 

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Vicky Wason's comment, February 21, 2013 9:25 AM
As a teacher who often is asked to write letters of recommendations, I enjoy the easy way to make recommendations on LindedIn.
Anita Windisman's comment, February 21, 2013 10:45 AM
Yes...great point, Vicky!
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Infographic: Is social media monitoring too Big Brother?

Infographic: Is social media monitoring too Big Brother? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Via digitalassetman
Ken Morrison's insight:

This post fits well with my post from earlier today by John Jantsch.  About four years ago, Jantsch released another eBook about the power of using social media as a listening tool.

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digitalassetman's curator insight, February 19, 2013 3:50 AM

Are consumers aware brands listen to their social conversations and, if so, what's their reaction to it?

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Facebook EdgeRank Tell-All

Facebook EdgeRank Tell-All | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Chad Wittman of EdgeRank Checker stops by to explain everything you need to know about the inner workings of Facebook EdgeRank.
Ken Morrison's insight:

EdgeRank is everything.  Yet, it isn't public nor stagnant.  Learn the elements of the equasion and what you can do to keep your Edgerank high.

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"Get a Room!" This will probably get creepy. Facebook launches Rooms for iOS, its first anonymous app

"Get a Room!"  This will probably get creepy.   Facebook launches Rooms for iOS, its first anonymous app | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Despite building its entire existence around real identities, social network giant Facebook today unveiled Rooms, its new anonymous app. The project was created by the Facebook Creative Labs team.

In the new app, users can create individual chatrooms around various topics they’d like to discuss, customize the color and design, invite others to join them via QR codes that can be shared, and hold anonymous discussions within the room. In a post on Rooms’ blog, Facebook’s product manager Josh Miller writes:

A room is a feed of photos, videos, and text – not too different from the one you have on Instagram or Facebook – with a topic determined by whoever created the room. Early users have already created rooms for everything from beat boxing videos to parkour to photos of home-cooked meals. There’s even a room called “Kicks From Above” that showcases photographs of cool shoes in cool places.
This isn’t the first time Facebook has dabbling in popular social app concepts pioneered by others. Facebook launched Poke back in December 2012 as a first shot at a Snapchat clone. After Poke went nowhere, it launched Slingshot in June this year.

Though it’s not hard to see how the popularity of apps like Secret and Whisper may have inspired Facebook to delve into anonymous sharing, Yik Yak is likely the biggest inspiration here. About a month ago, two weeks before the New York Times’ report on the upcoming anonymous app, Miller — who is also the cofounder of the Facebook-acquired Branch and the lead of Rooms — sent the following tweet:



Though Yik Yak is similar to Secret and Whisper in that it enables anonymous socializing, it also relies heavily on location as a means to group conversations thematically. For example, Yik Yak’s been launching on college campuses as a way to help students chat about the goings-on in their communities.

Along with Miller’s interest in Yik Yak, let’s not forget what Branch, his former startup, was all about: topical conversations in an invite-only online setting. It wasn’t anonymous (actually, the opposite), but Branch nevertheless was built around “chatrooms” revolving around a topic, just like Rooms.

Rooms is also an experiment that’s as anti-Facebook as it can get.

As mentioned, Facebook’s entire being has revolved around real identities, which arguably gave it an edge over other social networks like MySpace. However, this issue landed the company in hot water recently when it wouldn’t allow drag queens to use their stage names on Facebook, an issue that put alternative network Ello in the spotlight.

Along with the idea of connecting “real” people around the world, Facebook released Facebook Connect (now Facebook Login) in 2008, as a way to let its users easily login into other apps and websites, as well as enable those apps to pull various levels of information from users’ profiles. Entire businesses (Lyft, Tinder) were built around Facebook users’ real identities. In addition, people can comment on sites all over the Internet using their Facebook profiles.

But with Rooms, users can shield their names. They can anonymous chat and say whatever they want without it being tied to their identities and potential judgement from others. According to Miller:

One of the things our team loves most about the internet is its potential to let us be whoever we want to be. It doesn’t matter where you live, what you look like or how old you are – all of us are the same size and shape online. This can be liberating, but only if we have places that let us break away from the constraints of our everyday selves. We want the rooms you create to be freeing in this way. From unique obsessions and unconventional hobbies, to personal finance and health-related issues – you can celebrate the sides of yourself that you don’t always show to your friends.
Moreover, giving users free rein to customize the rooms they create (including colors, Like buttons, name, and so on) is a big deal. Unlike MySpace in the early 2000s, Facebook has created a one-size-fits-all design and has stuck to this approach.

But it’s not clear what the company will do with Rooms if it does take off: Monetizing it would be difficult, as plugging the app into Facebook would defeat the purpose of anonymity. But given Facebook’s lack of success with its previous experimental apps (Poke died and Slingshot is pretty forgotten now), it’ll be interesting to see if anonymity is the experiment that sticks for Facebook.

More information:

Facebook
Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w...
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7 Qualities That Make Some Curators Great

7 Qualities That Make Some Curators Great | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Every time I visit the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, I see something I’ve never seen before. In fact, t’s considered the most influential museum of modern art in the world. With that in mind, meet Klaus Biesenbach. Klaus holds the title “Chief Curator at Large” at MoMA. If you’ve visited the MoMA and walked away impressed (like I have), Klaus has a lot to do with that.

As content curators, we should all aspire to be like Klaus. After all, wouldn’t it be great if our content collections drew as much interest, respect and admiration as the collections at MoMA? In order to achieve this feat, we need to become highly effective content curators. In other words, we need to curate Internet content as we would fine art.

Let’s consider seven habits of content creation that would make Klaus Biesenbach proud. Continue reading →

Via Thomas Faltin
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaway:
I should get back into the habit of renaming titles that are aimed at the type of people who tend to like my site.  This article is a great reminder of what works well for successful curators.

1. Focus on Goals

2. Have Empathy

3. Be Careful, Cautious and Selective

4. Editorialize

5. Provide Attribution

6. Understand What’s Timely and Trending

7. Have an Eye for a Great Title

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What's On Zuck's Mind? - An Interview with Wired Magazine's Steven Levy

What's On Zuck's Mind? - An Interview with Wired Magazine's Steven Levy | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Steven Levy chats with Mark Zuckerberg about Facebook Home, News Feed, and building stuff the Hacker Way. Part of Wired's 20th anniversary issue.
Ken Morrison's insight:

One month later,

Facebook Home - It appears to be a bust, but it is still important to see what is on Zuck's mind.  This directly relates to "The Great Tech War of 2012" which I have posted many Scoops.

 

Big Takeaway:  Mark Zuckerberg now realizes that many people are moving toward the desire to share more but with a smaller percentage of people.  I am certain that this is why he has integrated Google's concept of putting friends in differeent groups.

 

He also mentions the newsfeed. I really don't like his comment about a cousin's pregnancy not being worthy of being at the top of your newsfeed.

 

He claims that the rollout of Graph Search was more accepted by the public because he was more active in getting beedback (feedforward) from the public. He mentions that the technology was ready to be rolled out months before it was announced. He chose to wait due to previous privacy concerns.

 

Ken

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Can Curation Create Critical Thinkers?

Can Curation Create Critical Thinkers? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education

Ken Morrison's insight:

This is exactly what i am trying to accomplish in my classroom. Thank you to Robin Good for this scoop. I could not do a proper rescoop on the mobile app.

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Google Helps Facebook Users Who Are Waiting For the New Timeline - VividTimes

Google Helps Facebook Users Who Are Waiting For the New Timeline - VividTimes | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Facebook unveiled a whole new news feed on last month with new features like bigger images, multiple feeds for different interests, but Facebook…
Ken Morrison's insight:

This article will take you to where you can download the add-on from the Google store.

 

Ken's Key Takeaway:

My students are using 'The Great Tech War" as a framework for this semester.  I find it interesting that Google is choosing to help fast-forward Facebook's timeline rollout.  Any thoughts or comments?  I'd love to hear what you think.

 

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Why Facebook May Not 'Like' the Future. Forrester says that Google will win the true war for likes.

Why Facebook May Not 'Like' the Future. Forrester says that Google will win the true war for likes. | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
"The database of affinity is Facebook's birthright," Forrester Analyst Nate Elliott says. "And it's going to blow it.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaway
Many Facebook users Like then Leave a brand. This skews advertising to people who already like the product. That may be helpful in some ways.  But because Google +1 system is built around current and future search needs and desires, Forrester feels that Facebook will lose the war for 'likes'.

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Ken Morrison's comment, April 16, 2013 2:29 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. Good luck with your new site!
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'Chinese Google' Opens Artificial-Intelligence Lab in Silicon Valley

'Chinese Google' Opens Artificial-Intelligence Lab in Silicon Valley | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

China's Baidu has set up shop in Silicone Valley.  How do you feel?  I'd like to hear your opinions with a comment.

Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaway:

China's Baidu ("Chinese Google") is dedicated to deep learning.  They have set up an office near Apple to attract top minds and programmers.  The tech war continues.  Remember that a big part of the tech war is the 2Ps...Pattents and Programmers. So large research labs like this in a location where tech programmers want to live can be seen as a bold move.

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An Eye On New Media 2013

Here is the 2013 version of my textbook that I curated for my students at Hannam University's Linton Global College.  Next year's vesion will include more of the teacher's notes that I share with my students.  I hope that it is helpful for you.  If you would like a free PDF version of the book, send me an email at kenmorrison30 (at) yahoo (dot) com or download it at the slideshare site.

 

I put a lot of work into the 2012 version.  I feel that it passed the test of time. There are some updates and additions in this version.  I also decreased the size of many images to make it less expensive to print.

 

Please please please support the real authors of this content.   I took great effort to give credit where it is due. I aimed to show my students how they could access enough free info on the web that was of equal or greater value than the wonderful information found in expensive textbooks. Feel free to share and please support the true authors of this book in any way you can (money, likes, blog comments, links, etc.) I am simply the currator of this content.

  

Would you like to see the output of this class?  Here is a collection of the Scoop.it curation sites which my students created to help them prepare for their future goals or research topics:

http://www.scoop.it/t/scoop-it-students

 

 

 

Ken

 

PS.  I simply love podcasts and I listen to more than 1000 per year.  I am planning on sharing some of my favorite tips that I learn from my daily podcasts at:

http://filterfailure.blogspot.kr

Ken Morrison's insight:

I put a lot of work into the 2012 version.  I feel that it passed the test of time. Thank you for the quality suggestions, support and feedback. There are some updates and additions in this version.  I also decreased the size of many images to make it less expensive to print.

 

Please please please support the real authors of this content.   I took great effort to give credit where it is due. I aimed to show my students how they could access enough free info on the web that was of equal or greater value than the wonderful information found in expensive textbooks. Feel free to share and please support the true authors of this book in any way you can (money, likes, blog comments, links, etc.) I am simply the currator of this content.

  

Ken

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Min Kim's comment, April 8, 2013 10:02 PM
Thank you for sharing your awesome work! This curation definitely helped me a lot in understanding what new media trends are. Please keep the great work!
Min Kim's curator insight, April 8, 2013 10:16 PM

켄모리슨 교수님이 자신이 제작한 2013년 교재 "An Eye On New Media" 를 공유했다. 소셜미디어와 구글 아마존등 온라인 거물들의 역사와 지도자들을 간단하게 담아냈으며, 어떻게 하면 개인이나 집단이 이런 소셜미디어의 세계에서 성공할 수 있는지에 대한 많은 기사와 정보들을 모아놨다.

 

My professor from Linton Global College, Ken Morrison, has made his 2013 version curated book "An Eye on New Media". This curated book contains much information about how current social media was established and how  our new meida trend will change over time. 2012 version of this book really helped me a lot understanding the fundamental knowledge about media. 

 

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Google Releases Interactive Infographic: "How Search Works"

Google Releases Interactive Infographic: "How Search Works" | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ever wondered how Google Search works, finds pages from across the web and decides how to list them in response to a search? If so, Google’s got a new resource designed to answer questions.
Ken Morrison's insight:

HOW SEARCH WORKS

 

Here is some insight from Google on how they treat SEO

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Technology_of_cooperation.pdf

Ken Morrison's insight:

Here is a free high-quality .pdf about the technologies and practices that lead to cooperation in society and in the classroom.

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ghbrett's curator insight, February 22, 2013 2:18 PM

Document that practices and the use of technology that lead to cooperation and collaboration.

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Why Crowdfunding Is In Your Website's Future - $10M Pebble Watch Campaign on Kickstarter

Why Crowdfunding Is In Your Website's Future - $10M Pebble Watch Campaign on Kickstarter | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

The "sheer genius" of the Pebble watch campaign on kickstarter will be somethig you want your team to emulate soon, very soon.


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Ken Morrison's insight:

Everyone is wondering if Apple will be releasing a watch.  They should  be checking out Pebble.  This pebble will be making ripples in the tech pond.  Great strategy!

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, February 19, 2013 8:07 PM

The Genius of the Pebble Watch Kickstarter Campaign
No one told the Pebble watch team they couldn't mashup distribution, pricing, marketing, sales and funding all in one brilliantly executed campaign. The team didn't have the "curse of knowledge". They didn't know how the game is normally played and that is really good.

Their lack of knowledge meant the Pebble watch team turned to Kickstarter to solve problems no one ever thought to solve via a "crowdfunding" platform. My ScentTrail Marketing post notes how getting distributors to come to you is brilliant.

Combine solving distribution with Pebble's amazing "create your own customized Pebble", an idea that puts the celebrity endorsement game on its head bedcause they fought to give Pebble $1200 each, and you get sheer marketing genius.

There is so much genius to go around here every Internet marketing team should study how Pebble solved traditional problems any startup faces with a single stroke of genius and OPP (Other People's Platforms).

I bet you lunch; your team will be using OPP in a similar way inside of two years.

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What You Need to Know About Facebook Graph Search

What You Need to Know About Facebook Graph Search | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about Facebook Graph Search. I will be updating this in real time. Will be completed by end of the day.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Blogger John Loomer gives some nice tidbits about how to prepare for Graph Search by Facebook

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