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New Media in Society, Business & Classrooms
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2014 Horizon Report

Ken Morrison's insight:

As in other years, the links of resources and stories at the end of each section make these predictions for easy to envision. 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-2256591

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-2256591 | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it


Revision techniques - the good, the OK and the useless

 

Deborah Cohen , BBC World Service

 

It's the time of year where students are poring over their books, trying to ensure they are prepared for their exams.

Revision charts, highlighter pens and sticky notes around the room are some of the methods people use to ensure information stays in their mind.

But now psychologists in the US warn many favourite revision techniques will not lead to exam success.

Universities, schools and colleges offer students a variety of ways to help them remember the content of their courses and get good grades.

These include re-reading notes, summarising them and highlighting the important points.

Others involve testing knowledge and using mnemonics - ways of helping recall facts and lists, or creating visual representations of the knowledge.

But teachers do not know enough about how memory works and therefore which techniques are most effective, according to Prof John Dunlovsky, of Kent State University.

 

Help - or hindrance?

He and his colleagues reviewed 1,000 scientific studies looking at 10 of the most popular revision strategies.

Highlighting may not help

They found that eight out of 10 did not work, or even hindered learning.

For example, many students love to take a highlighter to their notes.

But Prof Dunlovsky's research - published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science - found that picking out individual phrases in florescent yellow, green or pink can hinder revision.

"When students are using a highlighter they often focus on one concept at a time and are less likely to integrate the information they're reading into a larger whole," he says.

"That could undermine their comprehension of that material."

But he's not suggesting that highlighters should be abandoned as he recognises they are "safety blankets" for many students.

 

Plan ahead

Teachers regularly suggest reading through notes and essays from lessons and making summaries.

But Prof Dunlovsky says: "To our surprise it turns out that writing summaries doesn't help at all.

 

HOW THE TECHNIQUES FARED

Elaborativeinterrogation - being able to explain a point or fact - MODERATE

Sels-explanation - how a problem was solved -MODERATE

Summarizing-writing summaries of texts - LOW

Highlighting/underlining - LOW

Keyword mnemonics - choosing a word to associate with information - LOW

Imagery- forming mental pictures while reading or listening - LOW

RE-reading - LOW

Practice testing - Self-testing to check knowledge - especially using flash cards - HIGH

Distributed practice - spreading out study over time - HIGH

Interweaved practice - switching between different kinds of problems - MODERATE

 

"Students who go back and re-read learn as much as students who write a summary as they are reading."Some revision guides advise using memory aids, or mnemonics.Prof Dunlovsky says they can work well for remembering specifics, like Richard of York gave battle in vain, which allows people to remember the colours of the rainbow,

But he warns they are not applicable to other kinds of material. "They won't help you learn long passages or mathematics or physics."

 

So what does work?

Only two of the 10 techniques examined turned out to be really effective - testing yourself and spreading out your revision over time.

"Students who can test themselves or try to retrieve material from their memory are going to learn that material better in the long run", says Prof Dunlovsky.

"Start by reading the text book then make flash cards of the critical concepts and test yourself.

"A century of research has shown that repeated testing works."

This is because the student is more engaged and it is harder for the mind to wander.

 

He adds: "Testing itself when you get the correct answers appears to produce a more elaborative memory trace connected with your prior knowledge, so you're building on what you know".

 

Starting late

However the best strategy is to plan ahead and not do all your revision on one subject in a block before moving on to the next - a technique called "distributed practice".

Prof Dunlovsky says it is the "most powerful" of all the strategies.

Students who cram may pass the exam but they don't retain the material. ”

 

Prof John Dunlovsky,Kent State University

"In any other context, students use this technique. If you were doing a dance recital you wouldn't start practising an hour before, yet students like to cram for an exam."

Some students will always start late on their revision.

But Prof Dunlovsky says: "Students who cram may pass the exam but they don't retain the material.

"When they're going to be taking advanced classes in the subject, they are going to build on the knowledge they're developing, so I highly recommend distributed practice.

"A good dose of cramming that follows up on lots of distributive practice is the best way to go."

So do different techniques work for different individuals? Prof Dunlovsky says "no" - the top techniques work for everyone.

And experts think this paper could help teachers and lecturers help their students.

 

Dr Andrew Butler, of the department of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University in the US, says: "This paper is hugely important for the field and educational practice - it's about getting best practices into hands of educators."

But it is likely that students will still rely on what works for them, no matter what the science says.

Lea Corinth, who is studying international business and Spanish at the University of Westminster uses the re-reading technique - rated by the researchers as being of little use.

But she says: "I read over everything until I memorise it. It doesn't take too long.

"I make summary notes of everything important, put it in a folder and memorise everything."

But Abdul Harmetz, who is studying history at the same university, says: "I'm a crammer - I started revising yesterday and stayed up all night for my exam today, using old school techniques like copying everything out over and over again.

"The exam went all right actually."

  


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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What's In & Out: Trends In Learning Technology

What's In & Out: Trends In Learning Technology | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

“ What's In & Out: Trends In Learning Technology”


Via Grant Montgomery, Jim Lerman, Jenn Alevy
Ken Morrison's insight:

I don't find this to be overly scientific or reliabe, but it can be a good conversation starter.....

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 21, 2013 9:24 PM
Thanks for this!
Joe Boutte's comment, September 24, 2013 3:40 AM
Very interesting infographic. I'm optimistic about the "trending up" issues but dissappointed in the "trending down" issues, especially to see academics, transparency, and infographics going down. However, if elearning is trending down and blending learning is trending up, I think this is a positive overall trend for holistic, life-long learning. Thanks for the post!
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Where Does Gamification Fit in Higher Education? [#Infographic]

Where Does Gamification Fit in Higher Education? [#Infographic] | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Are points and badges a waste of time, or the key to unlocking hidden motivation in college students?
Ken Morrison's insight:

I found this report and infographic via the 2013 Horizon Report. It was good to see gamification rank so highly in their report. I was also a bit surprised to see them use this infographic as one of their sources for research.  We need to rethink what is 'real' teaching and what is 'real' research.

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Content curation as a way for students to develop critical thinking

Content curation as a way for students to develop critical thinking | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

I wanted students to be able to funnel their interests into a more authentic academic experience so that they could learn about what they want to learn about and become empowered as researchers, both casually and formally.


Via Robin Good, Guillaume Decugis, Denise Hoffmann
Ken Morrison's insight:

I have been happy with my students' results of using curation to learn more about their future goals.

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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, October 3, 2013 2:48 PM

An excellent story for lecturers or teachers thinking in content curation as a tool in their aulas.

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, October 7, 2013 11:22 PM

Useful for educators - key digital literacy skill

johanna krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 11:00 AM

content curation and critical thinking skills

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Social Scientist Diana Rhoten on 21st Century Learning, Youth Networks, and Digital Media

Diana Rhoten is director of the Knowledge Institutions program and the Digital Media and Learning project at the Social Science Research Council in New York....
Ken Morrison's insight:

Here is a great five-minute video by Diana Rhoten about how we can use new media in our classrooms to connect our learners with their passions in a way that will engage them and motivate them to keep learning beyond what we tell them to do.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 24, 2013 4:06 PM

We want connection Houston.

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Can Curation Create Critical Thinkers?

Can Curation Create Critical Thinkers? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education

Ken Morrison's insight:

This is exactly what i am trying to accomplish in my classroom. Thank you to Robin Good for this scoop. I could not do a proper rescoop on the mobile app.

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Why Finland And South Korea Students Lead the World in Education Results

Why Finland And South Korea Students Lead the World in Education Results | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Finland and South Korea top the charts in a new global education ranking. But with very different philosophies. We're looking at what the US – ranked number 17 – can learn.
Ken Morrison's insight:
An interesting podcast and documentary on some inside secrets of the success of South Korean and Finland public school systems.
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, February 9, 2013 12:37 PM

Some interesting insights.

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Warning: Thomas Friedman is an Education Expert Now

Warning:  Thomas Friedman is an Education Expert Now | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
I am reluctant to review newspaper articles or op-ed pieces in the same way I have handled journal articles, series chapters or literature from the developers of MOOC platforms.  However, if utiliz...
Ken Morrison's insight:

This doctoral students talks about flaws that he sees in some of the stats and perceptions surrounding MOOCS

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Here a MOOC, there a MOOC, everywhere a MOOC, MOOC . . .

Here a MOOC, there a MOOC, everywhere a MOOC, MOOC . . . | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

"During the second half of 2012, conversations within the ed-tech world were all a-Twitter linking and blogging about MOOCs at a fever pitch, identifying them as the impending disruptor in higher education. It wasn't until November that it seemed the more mainstream press finally covered it with the big headline, such as The Year of the MOOC .

...

Will MOOCs be transformative to higher education as other technologies were to other industries and sectors?  What's your riff?"


Via Peter B. Sloep, Miloš Bajčetić
Ken Morrison's insight:

Here is a fairly balanced look at the possibility of Moocs.

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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 28, 2013 11:56 AM

This articl4 is an attempt to go beyond the hype and assess what MOOCs really could mean for (US) education. It starts with a bit of history, including 'predictions' by Harvard's Clayton Christensen and by Nathan Harding on the bankruptcy of the current university system. It then continues with an inventory of what may have contributed to the MOOCs' rapidly increased popularity: college is in trouble anyway, the credit card debt is topped by the student loan debt, the flipped classroom is as good (or bad) as the teacher who does the flipping (with MOOCs being flipped classrooms taken to its logical conclusion). Amidst worries about equal access to higher education and the quality of MOOCs if they become widespread, Westerberg list 16 thoughts about what MOOCs might achieve. These really are intuitions about what the future might bring, useful intuitions in that they allow us to be prepared for the future (and thus ready to adjust its course).

 

Not all of her thoughts are original - such as MOOCs stimulate thinking about pedagogy, about online affordances, about knowledge sharing - but how could they in such a much discussed area? Original are the intuitions that MOOCs sharpen our intuitions as to what we do badly in schools, what the importance is of teachers and one-to-one interactions, and what is wrong with college.

 

I found this a stimulating article. Even though a substantial part of it is specific to the US (not even North-American) situation) and does not directly apply elsewhere in the world, it might soon. In the UK student fees have gone up tremendously this year, for example, so a student loan debt is in the making there too, it would seem. Elsewhere, governments fighting increasing deficits might consider the same solutions, with the same dire consequences. (@pbsloep)

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PSFK Future of Work Report 2013

Here is a very nice 70-slide overview of some of the trends and tools that are pointing the direction of the future of the workplace.


Via Linda Alexander
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:09 AM

Educators need to be informated as to the work environment their students will eventually be entering.  This report presents some of the key trends and "thematic takeaways".  For example, it's important that students learn to value life-long and independent learning as well as developing highly collaborative project management skills...

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What are the hot teaching topics for 2013? Edutopia News Knows. And they will prepare you.

What are the hot teaching topics for 2013? Edutopia News Knows.  And they will prepare you. | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

This is a great resource about what you can expect to be changing education in 2013

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Ken Morrison's comment, January 3, 2013 1:53 PM
Thank you for the rescoop Leona. I love Edutopia
Michael Obel-Omia's comment, January 5, 2013 1:19 PM
Thanks for sharing
ben bernard's comment, January 9, 2013 8:38 PM
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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay
Ken Morrison's insight:

I always appreciate frameworks.  Here are three frameworks to help us choose how we will use new technology in the classroom

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Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 12:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, December 28, 2012 2:46 AM

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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facebook, professors, and students

facebook, professors, and students | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
It's a conversation that begins with propriety and manners, moves into legalese and institutional policy, and ends up with moralizing. What should or shouldn't professors (and other college instruc...
Ken Morrison's insight:

I am sharing this for two reasons. I feel that it is an important discussion about how teachers should and should not be using social media.. Also, I have enjoyed past articles on digital digs.  It is a nice resource.  I found it again today thanks to Shephen Downes

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Pew: 15% Of Americans Don’t Have Internet. 5% Think It’s Irrelevant. | TechCrunch

Pew: 15% Of Americans Don’t Have Internet. 5% Think It’s Irrelevant. | TechCrunch | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
TechCrunch is a leading technology media property, dedicated to obsessively profiling startups, reviewing new Internet products, and breaking tech news.
Ken Morrison's insight:

I am glad that I found this article. 

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K8JTechLearn - NCCE 2012-Seattle

K8JTechLearn - NCCE 2012-Seattle | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

I was sure that I had shared this, but I could not find it in my bookmarks, Therefore, here you go....... :)

also, here is another nice link about PBL (Project Based Learning)
http://pennstate.swsd.wikispaces.net/file/view/PBL-Primer-www_techlearning_com.pdf ;

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Will you help me? -- Ken's Research Project (12-question online survey)

Will you help me?  -- Ken's Research Project (12-question online survey) | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

I will keep this low-pressure favor request short.

Thank you to those who have both followed my Scoop.it topic and (more importantly) helped me learn.

Would you be willing to share this online survey with any online networks of Korean students that you may belong to? Feel free to also share it with Korean students who may be willing to share it with their networks. I am comparing how Korean students use smartphone technology in Korea compared to how Korean students use it while studying abroad. I made it short and easy (12 questions). If you are comfortable sharing, you can just copy/paste below the line. Otherwise, just click around for other great content from the Scoop.it community

Thanks for considering it.

Onward...
Ken

---

Students, will you help me?

I made an easy & short 12-question survey to help me with a research project. If you are an international student living in Korea or a Korean-born student of any age (or any country), I would appreciate your answers.

Thank you for your support.

Ken

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1WrnbarsYXXqc0wxfWxO1p-Nq3FV6LyIZCD-Tvh6i6hk/viewform#start=invite

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Learning with Connectivism and ANT & ATM Analogy

Learning with Connectivism and ANT & ATM Analogy | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

In a world of information overload, Is Organisational Learning about learning with the database? Are Databases more like ATMs? Read on.

Ken Morrison's insight:

I am sharing this blog becaue it offers an insightful point of view regarding how to activate knowledge that exists in databases, libraries, websites, etc. I really like his "ATM" analogy and his video "In Simple Language".

 

He talks about how the ATM can be 'outsmarted', but it is really a failure in programming, which can be upgraded.  

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Mindshift Asks How Teachers Should Tackle Multitasking In Class?

Mindshift Asks How Teachers Should Tackle Multitasking In Class? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Important research compiled on the effects of students multitasking while learning shows that they are losing depth of learning, getting mentally fatigued, an
Ken Morrison's insight:

Teens and tech are tied together. How can we help students see the value of single-tasking?  

One important point is that some students sincerely feel that classes are not engaging enough to 'earn' their full attention.

 

Ken 

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The Architecture of Participation - Tim O'Reilly

The Architecture of Participation - Tim O'Reilly | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaway:

We often fail to attribute the world wide web to the list of acomplishments by open source programmers.  The low barriers for entry and the ability the 'look over the shoulder' of programmers via the 'view source' button led to inquiry and productivity.

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NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition

NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

The important annual Horizon report is out!

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“Students of all ages must be trained to curate content"

“Students of all ages must be trained to curate content" | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

“Students of all ages must be trained to search, select, qualify (and therefore disqualify), then enrich with their own thought, and then use and share information.”

 


Via Ally Greer, Jimun Gimm
Ken Morrison's insight:

Last year was the first year where I activiely encouraged students to curate content.  It has been a success.

Ken

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corneja's curator insight, February 13, 2013 5:10 AM

“If everyone can speak, to whom should I listen?” and “... how can I get heard?” #communication #content

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, March 8, 2013 1:41 PM

Teaching the important skills of information management. A thought provoking article.

Wayne Lang's curator insight, November 25, 2013 8:28 PM

Everyone needs to learn how to curate, not just students. I guess we are all students anyway.

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How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World?

How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Educators are always striving to find ways to make curriculum relevant in students’ everyday lives. More and more teachers are using social media around les

Via Gary Morrison
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Takeaways

The tools are less important than the tactics.  

 

This is a nice blog based on insight after reading Henry Jenkins' research findings and the 'PLAY' program (Participatory Learning and You)

 

Many teachers find connected learning to be 'messy'.  This article describes one teacher who 'let go' and the students created a project that they did not know met one of the future required state objectives. 

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Jan MacWatters's curator insight, January 19, 2013 5:55 AM

Interesting article..

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Why Do Facebook Users ‘Like’ Pages? Comparing 2010 to Today [INFOGRAPHIC]

Why Do Facebook Users ‘Like’ Pages? Comparing 2010 to Today [INFOGRAPHIC] | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

KEN's KEY TAKEAWAY:

87% of Facebook users like brand pages.  In 2010, only 38% did so.  Facebook thrives because they understand thir users.  Great brand pages know their specific visitiors.  My Key takeaway was that only 35% of Facbook fans feel that the brand listens to them. There was also an interesting discussion prompt about if a 'like' equals an opt-in for marketing messages.


Via Jonha Revesencio, Firas Ghunaim
Ken Morrison's insight:

87% of Facebook users like brand pages.  In 2010, only 38% did so.  Facebook thrives because they understand thir users.  Great brand pages know their specific visitiors.  My Key takeaway was that only 35% of Facbook fans feel that the brand listens to them. There was also an interesting discussion prompt about if a 'like' equals an opt-in for marketing messages.

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What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

"The term “project-based learning” gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they’re learning. Teachers might add projects meant to illustrate what students have learned, but may not realize what they’re doing is actually called 'project-oriented learning.' And it’s quite different from project-based learning..."


Via EDTC@UTB, William Machado, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ken Morrison's insight:

This is a wonderful resource for how to communicate with your bosses, students and their parents what project based learning is all about

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ben bernard's comment, January 9, 2013 8:37 PM
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