An Eye on New Media
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An Eye on New Media
New Media in Society, Business & Classrooms
Curated by Ken Morrison
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This may be the best way to measure gun violence in America

This may be the best way to measure gun violence in America | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Suddenly, an incredible picture of gun use emerges.
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This Week in Tech (MP3) by TWiT TV on iTunes

Download past episodes or subscribe to future episodes of This Week in Tech (MP3) by TWiT TV for free.
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Solid discussion about DOJ vs Apple
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Howard Rheingold's Tomorrow: Censorship Tools or Censorship Rules?

What are we really going to do about porno on the Internet? If censorship laws are not the answer, the question of easy access by children to objectionable material online remains a concern to parents, librarians, and teachers.
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Controversial ‘Innocence of Muslims’ film can go back on YouTube – federal court

Controversial ‘Innocence of Muslims’ film can go back on YouTube – federal court | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
The video “Innocence of Muslims,” which sparked riots in the Middle East and led to death threats, should not have been banned from YouTube, according to a federal appeals court. The decision represents a victory for advocates for free speech.
Ken Morrison's insight:
A reminder of our forgotten recent past
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The Latest Snowden Leak Is Devastating to NSA Defenders

The Latest Snowden Leak Is Devastating to NSA Defenders | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
The agency collected and stored intimate chats, photos, and emails belonging to innocent Americans—and secured them so poorly that reporters can now browse them at will.
Ken Morrison's insight:

It creeps me out that Snowden shared very private selfies with huge newspapers. It creeps me out much more that he got these photos easily by putting his thumb drive in a government computer that was stockpiling them.  

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▶ ACLU Releases "Police Tape" Android App - YouTube

"The New Jersey chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU-NJ) has just released "Police Tape," an Android phone app that allows people to securely ...
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Crowdsourced School Social Media Policy Now Available | Edudemic

Crowdsourced School Social Media Policy Now Available | Edudemic | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
I’ve been seeing a lot of people on social media looking for a social media policy and / or an acceptable use policy. So I offered to help spearhead an initiative where some of our amazing readers could help craft these policies from scratch. It started out very basic but, 400 edits later, has materialized into a thoughtful and well-organized document that’s a great template for any school. It may not be perfect for you, but use this as a jumping-off point to get your own policy started.

The School Social Media & Acceptable Use Policy
Social Media
Responsible Use Guidelines
2012-2013

We encourage teachers, students, staff, and other school community members to use social networking/media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) as a way to connect with others, share educational resources, create and curate educational content, and enhance the classroom experience. While social networking is fun and valuable, there are some risks you should keep in mind when using these tools. In the social media world, the lines are blurred between what is public or private, personal or professional.

We’ve created these social networking/media guidelines for you to follow when representing the school in the virtual world.

Please do the following:

Use good judgment

We expect you to use good judgment in all situations.
You must know and follow the school’s Code of Conduct and Privacy Policy.
Regardless of your privacy settings, assume that all of the information you have shared on your social network is public information.
Be respectful

Always treat others in a respectful, positive and considerate manner.
Be responsible and ethical

Even though you are approved to represent the school, unless you are specifically authorized to speak on behalf of the school as a spokesperson, you should state that the views expressed in your postings, etc. are your own. Stick with discussing school-related matters that are within your area of responsibility.
Be open about your affiliation with the school and the role/position you hold.
Be a good listener

Keep in mind that one of the biggest benefits of social media is that it gives others another way to talk to you, ask questions directly and to share feedback.
Be responsive others when conversing online. Provide answers, thank people for their comments, and ask for further feedback, etc.
Always be doing at least as much listening and responding as you do “talking.”
Don’t share the following:

Confidential information

Do not publish, post or release information that is considered confidential or not public. If it seems confidential, it probably is. Online “conversations” are never private. Do not use your birth date, address, and cell phone number on any public website.
Private and personal information

To ensure your safety, be careful about the type and amount of personal information you provide. Avoid talking about personal schedules or situations.
NEVER give out or transmit personal information of students, parents, or co-workers
Don’t take information you may receive through social networking (such as e-mail addresses, customer names or telephone numbers) and assume it’s the most up-to-date or correct.
Always respect the privacy of the school community members.
Please be cautious with respect to:

Images

Respect brand, trademark, copyright information and/or images of the school (if applicable).
You may use photos and video (products, etc.) that are available on the school’s website.
It is generally not acceptable to post pictures of students without the expressed written consent of their parents.
Do not post pictures of others (co-workers, etc.) without their permission.
Other sites

A significant part of the interaction on blogs, Twitter, Facebook and other social networks involves passing on interesting content or linking to helpful resources. However, the school is ultimately responsible for any content that is shared. Don’t blindly repost a link without looking at the content first.
Pay attention to the security warnings that pop up on your computer before clicking on unfamiliar links. They actually serve a purpose and protect you and the school.
When using Twitter, Facebook and other tools, be sure to follow their printed terms and conditions.
And if you don’t get it right…

Be sure to correct any mistake you make immediately, and make it clear what you’ve done to fix it.
Apologize for the mistake if the situation warrants it.
If it’s a MAJOR mistake (e.g., exposing private information or reporting confidential information), please let someone know immediately so the school can take the proper steps to help minimize the impact it may have.
__________________________________________________________________________

Social Media
Acceptable Use Policy
2012-2013

Introduction
YOURSCHOOLNAME recognizes that access to technology in school gives students and teachers greater opportunities to learn, engage, communicate, and develop skills that will prepare them for work, life, and citizenship. We are committed to helping students develop 21st-century technology and communication skills.

To that end, we provide access to technologies for student and staff use. This Acceptable Use Policy outlines the guidelines and behaviors that users are expected to follow when using school technologies or when using personally-owned devices on the school campus.

The network is intended for educational purposes.
All activity over the network or using district technologies may be monitored and retained.
Access to online content via the network may be restricted in accordance with our policies and federal regulations, such as the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).
Students are expected to follow the same rules for good behavior and respectful conduct online as offline.
Misuse of school resources can result in disciplinary action.
We make a reasonable effort to ensure students’ safety and security online, but will not be held accountable for any harm or damages that result from misuse of school technologies.
Users of the network or other technologies are expected to alert IT staff immediately of any concerns for safety or security.
Technologies Covered
YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide Internet access, desktop computers, mobile computers or devices, videoconferencing capabilities, online collaboration capabilities, message boards, email, and more.

As new technologies emerge, YOURSCHOOLNAME will attempt to provide access to them. The policies outlined in this document are intended to cover all available technologies, not just those specifically listed.

Usage Policies
All technologies provided by YOURSCHOOLNAME are intended for educational purposes. All users are expected to use good judgment and to follow the specifics of this document as well as the spirit of it: be safe, appropriate, careful and kind; don’t try to get around technological protection measures; use good common sense; and ask if you don’t know.

Web Access
YOURSCHOOLNAME provides its users with access to the Internet, including web sites, resources, content, and online tools. That access will be restricted in compliance with CIPA regulations and school policies. Web browsing may be monitored and web activity records may be retained indefinitely.

Users are expected to respect that the web filter is a safety precaution, and should not try to circumvent it when browsing the Web. If a site is blocked and a user believes it shouldn’t be, the user should follow protocol to alert an IT staff member or submit the site for review.

Email
YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide users with email accounts for the purpose of school-related communication. Availability and use may be restricted based on school policies.

If users are provided with email accounts, they should be used with care. Users should not send personal information; should not attempt to open files or follow links from unknown or untrusted origin; should use appropriate language; and should only communicate with other people as allowed by the district policy or the teacher.

Users are expected to communicate with the same appropriate, safe, mindful, courteous conduct online as offline. Email usage may be monitored and archived.

Social / Web 2.0 / Collaborative Content
Recognizing that collaboration is essential to education, YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide users with access to web sites or tools that allow communication, collaboration, sharing, and messaging among users.

Users are expected to communicate with the same appropriate, safe, mindful, courteous conduct online as offline. Posts, chats, sharing, and messaging may be monitored. Users should be careful not to share personally-identifying information online.

Mobile Devices Policy
YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide users with mobile computers or other devices to promote learning both inside and outside of the classroom. Users should abide by the same acceptable use policies when using school devices off the school network as on the school network.

Users are expected to treat these devices with extreme care and caution; these are expensive devices that the school is entrusting to your care. Users should report any loss, damage, or malfunction to IT staff immediately. Users may be financially accountable for any damage resulting from negligence or misuse.

Use of school-issued mobile devices, including use of the school network, may be monitored.

Personally-Owned Devices
Students may use personally-owned devices (including laptops, tablets, smartphones, and cell phones) at any time during school hours—unless such use interferes with the delivery of instruction by a teacher or staff or creates a disturbance in the educational environment.  Any misuse of personally-owned devices may result in disciplinary action.  Therefore, proper netiquette and adherence to the acceptable use policy should always be used.  In some cases, a separate network may be provided for personally-owned devices.

Security
Users are expected to take reasonable safeguards against the transmission of security threats over the school network. This includes not opening or distributing infected files or programs and not opening files or programs of unknown or untrusted origin. If you believe a computer or mobile device you are using might be infected with a virus, please alert IT. Do not attempt to remove the virus yourself or download any programs to help remove the virus.

Downloads
Users should not download or attempt to download or run .exe programs over the school network or onto school resources without express permission from IT staff. You may be able to download other file types, such as images of videos. For the security of our network, download such files only from reputable sites, and only for educational purposes.

Netiquette

Users should always use the Internet, network resources, and online sites in a courteous and respectful manner.
Users should also recognize that among the valuable content online is unverified, incorrect, or inappropriate content. Users should use trusted sources when conducting research via the Internet.
Users should also remember not to post anything online that they wouldn’t want parents, teachers, or future colleges or employers to see. Once something is online, it’s out there—and can sometimes be shared and spread in ways you never intended.
Plagiarism

Users should not plagiarize (or use as their own, without citing the original creator) content, including words or images, from the Internet.
Users should not take credit for things they didn’t create themselves, or misrepresent themselves as an author or creator of something found online. Research conducted via the Internet should be appropriately cited, giving credit to the original author.
Personal Safety
If you see a message, comment, image, or anything else online that makes you concerned for your personal safety, bring it to the attention of an adult (teacher or staff if you’re at school; parent if you’re using the device at home) immediately.

Users should never share personal information, including phone number, address, social security number, birthday, or financial information, over the Internet without adult permission.
Users should recognize that communicating over the Internet brings anonymity and associated risks, and should carefully safeguard the personal information of themselves and others.
Users should never agree to meet someone they meet online in real life without parental permission.
Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying will not be tolerated. Harassing, dissing, flaming, denigrating, impersonating, outing, tricking, excluding, and cyberstalking are all examples of cyberbullying. Don’t be mean. Don’t send emails or post comments with the intent of scaring, hurting, or intimidating someone else.
Engaging in these behaviors, or any online activities intended to harm (physically or emotionally) another person, will result in severe disciplinary action and loss of privileges. In some cases, cyberbullying can be a crime. Remember that your activities are monitored and retained.

Examples of Acceptable Use
I will:

Use school technologies for school-related activities and research.
Follow the same guidelines for respectful, responsible behavior online that I am expected to follow offline.
Treat school resources carefully, and alert staff if there is any problem with their operation.
Encourage positive, constructive discussion if allowed to use communicative or collaborative technologies.
Alert a teacher or other staff member if I see threatening/bullying, inappropriate, or harmful content (images, messages, posts) online.
Use school technologies at appropriate times, in approved places, for educational pursuits only.
Cite sources when using online sites and resources for research; ensure there is no copyright infringement.
Recognize that use of school technologies is a privilege and treat it as such.
Be cautious to protect the safety of myself and others.
Help to protect the security of school resources.
This is not intended to be an exhaustive list. Users should use their own good judgment when using school technologies.

Examples of Unacceptable Use
I will not:

Use school technologies in a way that could be personally or physically harmful to myself or others.
Search inappropriate images or content.
Engage in cyberbullying, harassment, or disrespectful conduct toward others–staff or students.
Try to find ways to circumvent the school’s safety measures and filtering tools.
Use school technologies to send spam or chain mail.
Plagiarize content I find online.
Post personally-identifying information, about myself or others.
Agree to meet someone I meet online in real life.
Use language online that would be unacceptable in the classroom.
Use school technologies for illegal activities or to pursue information on such activities.
Attempt to hack or access sites, servers, accounts, or content that isn’t intended for my use.
This is not intended to be an exhaustive list. Users should use their own good judgment when using school technologies.

Limitation of Liability
YOURSCHOOLNAME will not be responsible for damage or harm to persons, files, data, or hardware. While YOURSCHOOLNAME employs filtering and other safety and security mechanisms, and attempts to ensure their proper function, it makes no guarantees as to their effectiveness. YOURSCHOOLNAME will not be responsible, financially or otherwise, for unauthorized transactions conducted over the school network.

Violations of this Acceptable Use Policy
Violations of this policy may have disciplinary repercussions, including:

Suspension of network, technology, or computer privileges in extreme cases
Notification to parents in most cases
Detention or suspension from school and school-related activities
Legal action and/or prosecution
I have read and understood this Acceptable Use Policy and agree to abide by it:

__________________________________________
(Student Printed Name)
Ken Morrison's insight:

Does your school have a social media policy for educators and support staff?  If not, here is a nice starter kit.

Other resources on the topic include: 
http://edublogs.org/curriculum-corner-using-a-blog-with-students/#commenting

One school's policy:
http://4kmand4kj.global2.vic.edu.au/guidelinessafety/blog-guidelines/

Northwestern University's policy:
http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/communications/brand/social-media/

 

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The 'Chinese Google' Is Making Big Bucks Using AI to Target Ads | WIRED

The 'Chinese Google' Is Making Big Bucks Using AI to Target Ads | WIRED | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Deep learning can do many things. Tapping the power of hundreds or even thousands of computers, this new breed of artificial intelligence can help Facebook recognize people, words, and objects that appear in digital photos. It can help Google understand what you’re saying when you bark commands into an Android phone. And it can help…
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How to Delete Your Creeper Facebook Search History

How to Delete Your Creeper Facebook Search History | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Remember that time you had a bit too much wine and did a Facebook search for The One That Got Away? Facebook does. Here's how to clear that search history.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Done. I am curious if this will change my Newsfeed results.

 

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It's Not a WikiLeak: Assange-Manning Chat Logs Surface on Army Website | Threat Level | Wired.com

It's Not a WikiLeak: Assange-Manning Chat Logs Surface on Army Website | Threat Level | Wired.com | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
In March of 2010, WikiLeaks was just weeks away from bursting onto the world stage with the first of its major leaks from intelligence analyst Chelsea (then Bradley) Manning: the "Collateral Murder" video showing a 2007 Apache helicopter attack...
Ken Morrison's insight:

TheThe USdddThe 

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Just Delete Me | A directory of direct links to delete your account from web services.

If you choose to downsize and cut the clutter (or protect your privacy), this meta-link may be helpful. It keeps updated links to the 'close account' page of many popular social media and social commerce websites. 
Ken Morrison's insight:
If you choose to downsize and cut the clutter (or protect your privacy), this meta-link may be helpful. It keeps updated links to the 'close account' page of many popular social media and social commerce websites.  
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Ken Morrison's comment, September 1, 2013 3:45 AM
If you choose to downsize and cut the clutter (or protect your privacy), this meta-link may be helpful. It keeps updated links to the 'close account' page of many popular social media and social commerce websites.
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Are Manning and Snowden patriots? That depends on what we do next.

Are Manning and Snowden patriots? That depends on what we do next. | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
It depends on what they do next.
Ken Morrison's insight:

I feel that this article and "A Government Afriad of Itself"  (A government afraid of itself) are worth reading for the sake of conversation and deeper thought. This is a tough subject.  

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Charlie Dare's comment, August 28, 2013 11:56 AM
Neither done it "spill the beans" for personal gain.They blew the whistle on what they felt was wrong to media and people should know about in my opinion .The guy that broke the Watergate scandal (Ellisworth ?? Sp ) was a whistle blower too but he vetted what material he released, he is now sticking up for them..These guys just released a massive amount..with out knowing all the content as I understand.
Ken Morrison's comment, August 28, 2013 6:26 PM
Hi Charlie. I like that you bring up the potential argument that it does not have to be a binary argument. There are many stages between 'keep your mouth shut' and use a megaphone/Tumblr account. I agree that some vetting and restraint may have given a bit more credibility to the concept of wanting to inform the people while loving the country.
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The World's Biggest Data Breaches in One Stunning Visualization

The World's Biggest Data Breaches in One Stunning Visualization | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
We hear about major data breaches and hacks all of the time, but it's hard to conceptualize what it really means. This visualization will open your eyes.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Gaming industry companies and non-corporate oganizations tend to be the most vulnerable. 

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Here's the Full Transcript of TIME’s Interview With Apple CEO Tim Cook

Here's the Full Transcript of TIME’s Interview With Apple CEO Tim Cook | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
The chief executive of the world's most powerful tech company on your privacy, America's security, and his fight with the FBI
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Tim Cook: U.S. government wants ‘something we consider too dangerous to create’

Tim Cook: U.S. government wants ‘something we consider too dangerous to create’ | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
"We are challenging the FBI's demands with the deepest respect for American democracy and a love of our country," he said after a judge ordered Apple to help unlock a terrorist's iPhone.
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YouTube's role at issue over video that incited Mideast violence

Internet video giant YouTube has found itself drawn into a global drama being played out in violent Mideast protests over a 14-minute video trailer for "Innocence of Muslims," raising questions
Ken Morrison's insight:
A reminder that our government was indeed blaming the attack on a youtube video: http://articles.latimes.com/2012/sep/13/business/la-fi-ct-youtube-accountability-20120914

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Here’s how to see what Google’s sharing about you publicly

Here’s how to see what Google’s sharing about you publicly | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Take a few minutes to give yourself a Google privacy checkup.
Ken Morrison's insight:

A good weekend project. Links included to clear ^some^ of your/their archive

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The government is trying to censor the Internet again. Take 30 seconds and teach them a lesson.

The government is trying to censor the Internet again. Take 30 seconds and teach them a lesson. | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Just stop it already.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Form your opinion....quickly.  There will not be an expiration date on this bill which is being sold to the public as a free trade agreement.

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Facebook's Abbreviated Privacy Update, Even More Abbreviated

Facebook's Abbreviated Privacy Update, Even More Abbreviated | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Here's the important stuff.
Ken Morrison's insight:

This was helpful.

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"Get a Room!" This will probably get creepy. Facebook launches Rooms for iOS, its first anonymous app

"Get a Room!"  This will probably get creepy.   Facebook launches Rooms for iOS, its first anonymous app | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Despite building its entire existence around real identities, social network giant Facebook today unveiled Rooms, its new anonymous app. The project was created by the Facebook Creative Labs team.

In the new app, users can create individual chatrooms around various topics they’d like to discuss, customize the color and design, invite others to join them via QR codes that can be shared, and hold anonymous discussions within the room. In a post on Rooms’ blog, Facebook’s product manager Josh Miller writes:

A room is a feed of photos, videos, and text – not too different from the one you have on Instagram or Facebook – with a topic determined by whoever created the room. Early users have already created rooms for everything from beat boxing videos to parkour to photos of home-cooked meals. There’s even a room called “Kicks From Above” that showcases photographs of cool shoes in cool places.
This isn’t the first time Facebook has dabbling in popular social app concepts pioneered by others. Facebook launched Poke back in December 2012 as a first shot at a Snapchat clone. After Poke went nowhere, it launched Slingshot in June this year.

Though it’s not hard to see how the popularity of apps like Secret and Whisper may have inspired Facebook to delve into anonymous sharing, Yik Yak is likely the biggest inspiration here. About a month ago, two weeks before the New York Times’ report on the upcoming anonymous app, Miller — who is also the cofounder of the Facebook-acquired Branch and the lead of Rooms — sent the following tweet:



Though Yik Yak is similar to Secret and Whisper in that it enables anonymous socializing, it also relies heavily on location as a means to group conversations thematically. For example, Yik Yak’s been launching on college campuses as a way to help students chat about the goings-on in their communities.

Along with Miller’s interest in Yik Yak, let’s not forget what Branch, his former startup, was all about: topical conversations in an invite-only online setting. It wasn’t anonymous (actually, the opposite), but Branch nevertheless was built around “chatrooms” revolving around a topic, just like Rooms.

Rooms is also an experiment that’s as anti-Facebook as it can get.

As mentioned, Facebook’s entire being has revolved around real identities, which arguably gave it an edge over other social networks like MySpace. However, this issue landed the company in hot water recently when it wouldn’t allow drag queens to use their stage names on Facebook, an issue that put alternative network Ello in the spotlight.

Along with the idea of connecting “real” people around the world, Facebook released Facebook Connect (now Facebook Login) in 2008, as a way to let its users easily login into other apps and websites, as well as enable those apps to pull various levels of information from users’ profiles. Entire businesses (Lyft, Tinder) were built around Facebook users’ real identities. In addition, people can comment on sites all over the Internet using their Facebook profiles.

But with Rooms, users can shield their names. They can anonymous chat and say whatever they want without it being tied to their identities and potential judgement from others. According to Miller:

One of the things our team loves most about the internet is its potential to let us be whoever we want to be. It doesn’t matter where you live, what you look like or how old you are – all of us are the same size and shape online. This can be liberating, but only if we have places that let us break away from the constraints of our everyday selves. We want the rooms you create to be freeing in this way. From unique obsessions and unconventional hobbies, to personal finance and health-related issues – you can celebrate the sides of yourself that you don’t always show to your friends.
Moreover, giving users free rein to customize the rooms they create (including colors, Like buttons, name, and so on) is a big deal. Unlike MySpace in the early 2000s, Facebook has created a one-size-fits-all design and has stuck to this approach.

But it’s not clear what the company will do with Rooms if it does take off: Monetizing it would be difficult, as plugging the app into Facebook would defeat the purpose of anonymity. But given Facebook’s lack of success with its previous experimental apps (Poke died and Slingshot is pretty forgotten now), it’ll be interesting to see if anonymity is the experiment that sticks for Facebook.

More information:

Facebook
Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w...
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Dutch Student Sells All of His Personal Data for 350 Euros

Dutch Student Sells All of His Personal Data for 350 Euros | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
A Dutch student has taken the bold decision to sell all his data at auction. It's a decision that should make us think about the future of our own information.
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FIRE, ACLU of Kansas, and NCAC Send Letter to Kansas Board of Regents; Board Hints at Changes - The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education - FIRE

FIRE, ACLU of Kansas, and NCAC Send Letter to Kansas Board of Regents; Board Hints at Changes - The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education - FIRE | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

The Kansas Board of Regents made a policy last week to terminate university employees for social media behavior that they consider to be questionable.   

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Edward Snowden statement: Every call, internet transaction goes through NSA

Edward Snowden statement: Every call, internet transaction goes through NSA | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Prism leaker Edward Snowden released a statement to the American Civil Liberties Union today, saying that every internet transaction that passes the borders of the United States goes through the NS...
Ken Morrison's insight:

Snoden supports "Stop Watching Us" Movement

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Bradley Manning Sentenced To 35 Years In WikiLeaks Case : NPR

The 25-year-old former Army intelligence analyst was responsible for the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history. In 2010, he gave WikiLeaks more than 700,000 documents. A judge handed down his sentence Wednesday.
Ken Morrison's insight:

A great documentary:

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/wikileaks/bradley-manning/

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Manning conviction under Espionage Act worries civil liberties campaigners

Manning conviction under Espionage Act worries civil liberties campaigners | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Private awaits sentencing in WikiLeaks case as one observer says: 'Obama has managed to do what Nixon couldn't'
Ken Morrison's insight:

There was some very good discussion this week on two of my favorite podcasts, "On The Media" and "This Week In Tech".  Both podcasts mentioned this article.

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